Algeria

3,655 views
3,375 views

Published on

Algeria

Published in: Travel, Business

Algeria

  1. 1. eria<br />Alg<br />
  2. 2. Contents<br />Topic<br />Slide No.<br />
  3. 3. Fact File<br />Full name: The People's Democratic Republic of Algeria.<br />Capital and largest city : Algiers, 3,917,000 (metro. area).<br />Area: 2.4 million sq km (919,595 sq miles).<br />Ethnicity: Arab-Berber 99%, European less than 1% .<br />National Holiday: Revolution Day, November 1.<br />Total area: 919,590 sq mi(2,381,741 sq km).<br />Major religion: Islam.<br />President: Abdel-Aziz Bouteflika (1999).<br />Prime Minister: Ahmed Ouyahia (2008).<br />Population (2010 est.):  35.7 million .<br />Other large cities: Oran, Constantine, Batna, Annaba.<br />Major languages: Arabic (official), French, Berber.<br />Monetary unit: 1 Algerian Dinar = 100 Centimes.<br />
  4. 4. The Algerian Flag:<br />White - peace and honesty.<br />Green - hope, joy and love and in many cultures have a sacred significance.<br />The color green on the Algerian flag is a traditional symbol of the state religion of Islam.<br />Emblem:<br />The hand of Fatima, a traditional symbol of the region, appears in front of the Atlas Mountains, below a rising sun representing a new era. Buildings stand for industry and plants for agriculture. <br />Abdel-Aziz Bouteflika<br />
  5. 5. Algiers<br />Motto: " بالشّعب وللشّعب "  (Arabic).<br />"By the people and for the people".<br />In Salah<br />Anthem:  " قسمًا " (Arabic).<br />“We Pledge”.<br />National Bird :<br />Oiseaux D‘algere<br />National Animal :<br />Fennec<br />
  6. 6. Geographical Position and Features<br />Algeria , officially the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria also formally referred to as the Democratic and Popular Republic of Algeria , is a country in North Africa.<br />The country supplies large amounts of natural gas to Europe. Energy exports are the backbone of the economy thanks to the good geographical position.<br />In terms of land area, Algeria is the largest country on the Mediterranean Sea, the second largest on the African continent after Sudan, and the eleventh-largest country in the world. Nearly four times the size of Texas, Algeria is bordered by Morocco and Western Sahara at it’s west and Libya to its east. Algeria is bordered by Tunisia at northeast and the Mediterranean Sea at Algeria’s north. To the southwest are Mauritania and Mali, and to the southeast it’s Niger . <br />The Sahara desert which covers more than four-fifths (85%) of the land is almost completely uninhabited. Oil and gas reserves were discovered in the 1950s.<br />The highest point is Mount Tahat in the Sahara, which rises 3,000 m (9,850 ft). Total area: 919,590 sq mi (2,381,741 sq km).<br />
  7. 7. Algeria is divided topographically into three main regions that generally run east-west. They are the :High Plateaus , Tell and the Sahara.Mountainous areas subject to severe earthquakes, mud slides.Climate: Arid to semiarid; mild, wet winters with hot, dry summers along coast; drier with cold winters and hot summers on high plateau; a hot, dusts and-laden wind called sirocco is especially common in summer. Precipitation is heaviest in the northern part of eastern Algeria, where it reaches as much as 1,000 mm in some years.<br />Raster graphics data of Algeria. <br />Most of the coastal area is hilly, sometimes even mountainous, and there are a few natural harbours. The area from the coast to the Tell Atlas is fertile. In this region the winter days and nights are cool to chilly. Rainfall is fairly abundant along the coastal part of the Tell Atlas, ranging from 400 to 670 mm annually, the amount of precipitation increasing from west to east. <br />The Ahaggar Mountains, also known as the Hoggar, are a highland region in central<br />Sahara. They are located about 1,500 km south<br />of the capital.<br />ReliefFeatures<br />Topographic map of Algeria<br />
  8. 8. Deciduous trees<br />Vegetation<br />Vegetation in Algeria, where all areas are subject to some seasonal aridity, is characteristically drought-resistant. Forests cover only about 2 percent of the entire land area and are found primarily in the less-accessible mountain regions, where remnants of evergreen forests remain on the moister slopes. <br />Northern Algeria’s native plants are the olive and cork oak. The coastal plains of this region contain many grape vines, which are endemic to the area. Themountain andplain regions have large evergreen forests of pines, junipers, and oaks, as well as some deciduous trees. Warmer areas grow pines, eucalyptus, agaves, and fig trees.  <br />
  9. 9. Jackals<br />Wildlife<br />Boars<br />The forests of the mountainous regions are filled with jackals and boars. The other common mammals of the country are rabbits and jerboas. The deserts also have a variety of snakes, both poisonous and non poisonous, scorpions, and countless kinds of insects.  Camels are used in great numbers throughout the country.<br />
  10. 10. Forestry<br />The country’s aridity, however, renders more than four-fifths of the land uncultivable, and most of the remaining agricultural land is suitable only for pasture. The rest is tilled or devoted to vineyards and orchards. Winter grains—wheat, barley, and oats—are grown on the largest area of arable land in the drier High Plateau, notably around Constantine, and in the Sersou Plateau to the west. Also in the west, esparto grass grows naturally on the region’s steppe plains. Tobacco, olives, and dates are important crops, as are sorghum, millet, corn (maize), rye, and rice. The climate is not well suited to extensive stock raising, but there are many scattered herds of cattle, goats, and sheep, and stock raising contributes significantly to the traditional sector of agriculture.<br />Cultivation and Animal Rearing<br />
  11. 11. Agriculture<br />Cultivated land is largely restricted to the coastal plains and valleys. These areas were colonized by French settlers, who established vineyards, orchards, citrus groves, and market gardens. The best farms were located in the well-watered fertile plains around Bejaïa and Annaba in the east, in the Mitidja Plain south of Algiers, and beyond Oran from SidiBelAbbès to Tlemcen. Rich vineyard areas were also maintained on the Médéa and Mascara plateaus.<br />
  12. 12. Bejai Plage Coast<br />Port of Oran<br />Irregular precipitation has long been a threat to agriculture, but dam construction and irrigation projects have added some stability to crop production. At independence Algeria possessed some 20 sizable dams. An active and ongoing construction program nearly doubled that number by the late 1980s, adding substantially to the country’s total irrigated acreage. Despite such efforts, the nation’s meagre water resources are under increasing pressure to meet its urban-industrial demands as well.<br />Fishing<br />
  13. 13. Some of Algeria’s main natural resources are petroleum, natural gas, iron ore, phosphates, uranium, lead and zinc.<br />By far, Algeria's most significant exports today petroleum and natural gas. The reserves are mostly in the Eastern Sahara. Other significant exports are sheep, oxen, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits(chiefly figs and grapes) and seeds, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork and tobacco. <br />The import of wool exceeds the export. Sugar, coffee, machinery, metal work of all kinds, clothing and pottery are largely imported. Of these by far the greater part comes from France. The British imports consist chiefly of coal, cotton fabrics and machinery.<br />Algeria trades most extensively with France and Italy, in terms of both imports and exports, but also trades with the United States and Spain. Algeria currently has only one stock exchange, the Algiers Stock Exchange.<br />E<br />c<br />o<br />n<br />o<br />m<br />y<br />
  14. 14. P<br />R<br />O<br />V<br />I<br />N<br />C<br />E<br />S<br />Algeria is divided into 48 provinces ,553 districts and 1,541 municipalities. Each province, district, and municipality is named after its seat, which is usually the largest city. According to the Algerian constitution, a province is a territorial collectivity enjoying some economic freedom.<br />The People's Provincial Assembly is the political entity governing a province, which has a "president", who is elected by the members of the assembly. They are in turn elected on universal suffrage every five years. <br />
  15. 15. DemographicTrends<br />Algeria’s annual rate of population growth was high throughout much of the latter half of the 20th century, but by the late 1980s overall growth—birth rates in particular—had begun to decline. The population is youthful, about half being age 19 or younger. A drop in infant mortality rates has contributed to a decline in overall death rates, but these have been partly offset by the lower birth rates. Life expectancy is about 70 years.<br />Algerian emigration to Europe, once a viable alternative for the country’s unemployed, declined in the late 20th century as France restricted further immigration, but decades of such migration have left a large Algerian diasporas in western European countries.<br />Occupations<br />This entry lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by occupation.<br />Labor force - by occupation: agriculture: 13.4% industry: 14.6% construction and public works: 16% trade: 14.6% government: 32% other: 16% (2003 est.)<br />
  16. 16. Culture<br />Various types of music are native to Algeria. One of the most popular, originating in the western part of the country, is raï (opinion or view), which combines varying instrumentation with simple poetic lyrics. Both men and women are free to express themselves in this style. One especially popular Algerian singer of raï, Khaled, has exported this music to Europe and the United States, but he and other popular musicians such as ChebMami have been targets of Islamic extremists. Wahrani (the music of Oran), another style, blends raï with classical Algerian music of the Arab-Andalusian tradition.<br />
  17. 17. Algiers International Airport<br />Transportation<br />A good road network is in place in the densely populated Tell region, complete with express highways around the city of Algiers. Fast and frequent rail service was established between Oran, Algiers, and Constantine by the late 20th century.<br />The main rail line parallels the coast and extends from the Moroccan to the Tunisian border. Two trans-Saharan roads have been built: one paved route from El-Goléa to Tamanghasset and then south to Niger, the other from El-Goléa to Adrar and then on to Mali. A state bus company and several privatecompanies provide reliable intercity bus services.<br />The principal ports are Algiers, Oran, Annaba, Bejaïa, Bettioua, Mostaganem, and Ténès, in addition to the primarily petroleum and natural gas ports at Arzew and Skikda. Algeria’s merchant fleet has grown into a major world shipping line.<br />Air Algérie, the state airline, operates flights to many foreign countries and provides daily domestic flights between the country’s major cities and towns.<br />
  18. 18. Atlas Mountains<br />Atlas Mountains<br />The Atlas Mountains are a mountain range across a northern stretch of Africa extending about 2,500 km through Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia. The highest peak is the Toubkal mountain, with an elevation of 4,167 metres.TheAtlas ranges separate the Mediterranean and Atlantic coastlines from the Sahara Desert. <br />The mountains are or were home to a number of plant and animal species unique in Africa many of them are endangered and some have already gone extinct. Examples include the Atlas Cedar, the Atlas Bear, the Barbary Leopard, the Barbary Macaque, Barbary Sheep, the Barbary Lion, the North African Elephant, the European Black Pine, the Dippers, the Algerian Oak, and Cuvier's Gazelle. <br />The Atlas are rich in natural resources. There are deposits of iron ore, lead ore, copper, silver, mercury, rock salt, phosphate, marble,anthracite coal, and natural gas among other resources.<br />
  19. 19. Gallery<br />
  20. 20. 5<br />
  21. 21. 4<br />
  22. 22. 3<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25. PICTURE<br />START<br />
  26. 26. Khemis Miliana <br />
  27. 27. ArthusBetrand<br />
  28. 28. El Mahdia valley <br />
  29. 29. Thermmal Springs of HammanMeskoutine<br />
  30. 30. Cultivations in the Tlemcan region<br />
  31. 31. Mers el kebir<br />
  32. 32. Trarasmonts coast<br />
  33. 33. El Golea Oasis<br />
  34. 34. Vegetation inside the dunes, near El-Oued<br />
  35. 35. Djemila, Kabylie<br />
  36. 36. Flennec<br />
  37. 37. Thank you!<br />Done By <br />Disha Shahani .<br />

×