You are Political

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A brief overview of what constitutes a politically significant event, what creates one's political perspective, how to deal with different political perspectives, and the differences between fact and opinion.

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You are Political

  1. 1. You are Political POLITICS IS ALL AROUND YOU! THIS EXERCISE WILL DEMONSTRATE WHY PEOPLE THINK DIFFERENTLY ABOUT THE SAME ISSUES, AND HOW TO DEAL WITH IT.
  2. 2. Political Significance  Hopefully you have watched the news, read articles in the newspaper or followed stories online.  With a partner, create a list of at least FIVE current news stories or events that have been in the news over the summer or very recently  Once you have created the list, go over it again and try to determine which events are politically significant.  Choose one or two that you feel are the most significant and share them with the class with an explanation of why you chose them.
  3. 3. Political Significance Criteria  What makes an event politically significant? 1. Does it have a lasting impact on society? 2. Is the impact extreme is a positive or negative way? 3. Are many people affected by the issue positively or negatively? 4. Does it directly affect you, your family, friends, and/r community? 5. Are many people for and/or against it? 6. Are the differences between supporters and opponents great? 7. Is it an ethical issue involving right and wrong?  If you answered ‘yes’ to a majority of this criteria with the event you chose, it is most likely politically significant.
  4. 4. Scenario  It has been decided by Parliament that they will be given access to all of the digital information (e-mail, texts, social media) of potential terrorists without a warrant.  Do you agree or disagree with this decision?  Try to create a ‘pro & con’ list  Discuss with a partner. Be prepared to share with the class.
  5. 5. Political Perspective  Why do you think there were many different viewpoints in the class?  As a class, brainstorm the factors that contribute to citizens having different opinions
  6. 6. Political Perspective  Reasons for different perspectives:  Age  Family  Community  Personal Experiences  Gender  Job  Personal Interest  Income  Education  Religion  Values
  7. 7. Example of Multiple View Points Soldier Should Canada go to War? Pacifist Business Owner Prime Minister Veteran Soldier’s family member Religious Leader
  8. 8. Case Study: Climate Change  Watch the following video and keep track of the evidence that is used to support or refute the debate concerning climate change:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zFruNyiUHQ  These two individuals have very different opinions on one issue. What reasons are there to explain this? (think of our perspective criteria).  Is it a positive or a negative that people can be on such opposite ends of an issue?
  9. 9. Reflection  What if your beliefs, values, and ideology are different from someone else’s? Who is right in their perspective?  What are the consequences of not considering the perspectives of others?  How might the political perspective of someone who is a part of the majority differ compared to someone who is in the minority?  How do you react when others ignore or reject your perspective?
  10. 10. Now What?  We have determined so far what issues can be considered politically significant.  We have also determined that citizens can have totally different perspectives on one issue and how many factors can determine why.  How can people look at the same evidence and come to different conclusions?  What is fact compared to opinion?  What is evidence compared to an argument?  It is important to understand these differences when looking at an issue
  11. 11. Evidence  The ability to gather evidence is the key to understanding the difference between fact and opinion.  Evidence is a fact that supports a conclusion.  It offers proof of accuracy and helps us understand what is happening.  Active citizens need to be able to tell the difference between facts, opinions, and arguments.  They also need to be able to gather evidence tin support of their beliefs to determine conclusions that make sense.
  12. 12. Evidence or Opinion  Deserts are not as beautiful as forests  Madrid is the capital of Spain  Lemons and limes look similar except for their colour  All dinosaurs are extinct  Our school is a brick building  Civic Mirror is going to be intense
  13. 13. Power of Persuasion  Evidence can be used to serve the person who presents it.  In July, Canada’s unemployment went down 0.1%. Good right?  Those who looked at the data attributed that to less Canadians looking for work. Why might a politician forget to mention this point?  Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne Tweeted out that Ontario created 15,100 new jobs in July. Good right?  Those who looked at the data attributed that to the creation of more part time jobs while the number of fault time jobs actually decreased. Why might she forget to mention the difference?
  14. 14. Sources  Civics and Citizenship by Canadian Investigations  http://www.teach-nology. com/worksheets/language_arts/factopin/fa ctop1.html

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