• Save
2012 Minnesota Internet Survey
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

2012 Minnesota Internet Survey

on

  • 246 views

The 2012 Minnesota Internet Survey is conducted every two years by the Center for Rural Policy & Development in St. Peter, MN. The survey looks at adoption rates in the Twin Cities metro area and the ...

The 2012 Minnesota Internet Survey is conducted every two years by the Center for Rural Policy & Development in St. Peter, MN. The survey looks at adoption rates in the Twin Cities metro area and the rest of the state, what people like to do online, and how they access the Internet.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
246
Views on SlideShare
246
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Note differences between Rural and Metro
  • Very likely has to do with age.
  • The remaining non-adopters can be characterized in three ways.Attitude“I don’t need Internet”“I wouldn’t know how to use it”Affordability“It’s too expensive”Alternatives“I can get it someplace else (for free)”MobilityPortable devices make it easy to access the Internet away from homeNature of access is changingChanging expectations on accessNo longer necessary to buy home access, at least for a fixed locationAffects providers, consumers, businesses, policy makersFewer rural consumers using Internet outside the home: fewer options?3g vs 4g cell phone serviceSpeedBandwidth is still a function of locationDemand for bandwidth is only going upToday: Streaming video services, online gamingTomorrow: Education, health care and business promise to be large users of bandwidthCommunities that cannot add capacity will fall behind as new technology goes from fantasy to reality

2012 Minnesota Internet Survey 2012 Minnesota Internet Survey Presentation Transcript

  • 2012 Minnesota Internet Survey November 2012 Center for Rural Policy and Development St. Peter, MN© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Minnesota Internet Survey  Began as the Rural Minnesota Survey in 2001  Developed as a way to measure the adoption rate of computers, Internet use and broadband across rural Minnesota  In 2005, the Twin Cities metropolitan counties were added to provide comparison  In 2012, cell phones were added to capture the population of cell phone-only households, which make up 26% of households statewide.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • 2012 Findings  Adoption rates continue to go up, but at a slower rate; rural is still several percentage points behind the Twin Cities.  Over one quarter of Minnesota households use cell phones only.  Use of social media, VOIP, and streaming video are up dramatically in the last two years.  People are accessing the Internet outside the home more than ever with a larger variety of devices than ever.  The primary reasons people give for not purchasing broadband access at home are lack of interest and cost.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Rural and urban in MinnesotaThe seven-county TwinCities metro area ishome to about 60% ofthe state’s population.
  • Computer, Internet, and broadband adoption since 2001© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Who’s using what Computer Internet Broadband Metro 86.7% 83.1% 79.2% Rural 78.3% 74.5% 70.6% Percentage of households with these technologies in their homes.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Who’s using what Rural Metro Cable modem 20.5% 27.6% DSL 23.7% 22.2% High-speed wireless 22.1% 27.7% High-speed satellite 4.3% 1.7% Dial up 2.2% 0.9% Percentage of Dont know 1.7% 3.0%households with a home Internet Dialup HHs (est.) 38,151 19,267 connection© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Broadband adoption by age 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% Rural 40% Metro 30% Percentage of all households 20% 10% 0% 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Broadband adoption by income 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% Rural 40% Metro 30% Percentage of all households 20% 10% 0% < $25,000 $25,000 $40,000 $50,000 $75,000 $100,000 $150,000 to to to to to + $39,000 $49,000 $74,000 $99,000 $150,000© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Broadband adoption rates by income, 2003 & 2012 $100,000 + $75,000 to $99,000 $50,000 to $74,000 2003 $40,000 to $49,000 2012 $25,000 to $39,000 Among all < $25,000 households 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0%© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • The impact of the presence of children in the household Rural Metro Kids No kids Kids No kids Do you have a 89.7% 74.0% 96.4% 81.6% computer? Do you have an Internet 88.7% 69.1% 93.9% 77.5% connection? Do you have 85.7% 64.9% 90.9% 73.1% broadband? How important is being able to access 58.5% 37.9% 65.2% 51.2% Among all broadband? (Very important) households© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Using broadband Mean hours Yes Metro 4.6 Metro 85.7% Rural 4.2 Rural 78.0% How many hours a Are you satisfied with week is someone in the speed of your your household Internet connection? accessing the Internet?© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • What we do online Rural Metro Send and receive email 96.2% 98.6% Check the weather 88.7% 89.3% Access news web sites 79.9% 82.6% Research a purchase youre planning 79.6% 86.3% Purchase something at an online store or auction 77.6% 84.0% Do banking, pay bills or other financial business online 77.2% 85.4% Use social media 75.1% 81.8% Top ten Stay informed on community activities online news and events 69.6% 69.6% among households Share photos 69.3% 79.8% with a home Internet connection Research medical information 63.9% 70.1%© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Fastest growing activities  Social media  Staying informed on community news and events  Watching movies or TV shows  Placing a phone call over the Internet  Playing games online with other gamers  Selling goods or services online  Communicating with your doctor, nurse, or other caregiver© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Differences between rural and metro Difference (Percentage Rural Metro points) Watch movies or TV shows 46% 71% 25 Download music or video files 55% 73% 18 Share photos 69% 80% 11 Communicate There is still a large with doctor or gap between rural nurse or other and metro in some caregiver 13% 23% 10 activities. Do work for employer at home 33% 44% 10© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • How we access the Internet at home 100% 80% 60% Rural 40% Metro 20% Among households with 0% a home Internet Home Tablet Cell phone Gaming Other computer computer device connection “Other” included e-readers, video devices such as Roku, netbooks, and iPods.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • What we use the most to connect to the Internet Rural Metro Home Computer 73.8 69.9 Tablet 12.3 11.0 Cellular Phone 9.6 11.0 Gaming Device 2.9 5.3 Other devices 1.4 2.8 Among households with a home Internet connection© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Accessing broadband outside the home 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% Rural 10% Among households Metro 5% reporting that they 0% accessed the Internet somewhere outside their home.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • “How important is it that you be able to access broadband in your home?” 60% 50% 40% 30% Rural Metro 20% Among all households 10% 0% 1 Not 2 Somewhat 3 Neutral 4 Somewhat 5 Very Important not important important Important© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Importance of home access by age 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% Rural Metro 30% 20% Percentage reporting “very 10% important” 0% 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Why people don’t purchase Internet at home Rural Metro Doesnt need Internet access 12.2% 7.0% Has access to Internet someplace else 1.8% 2.7% Not available where they live 0.5% 1.0% Too expensive 4.5% 2.5% Doesnt know how to use the Internet 2.6% 1.5% Among all households Concerned about the security of their information 1.6% 0.6% Other reason 2.3% 1.5%© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Why people don’t purchase Internet for their home  25% of rural households and 17% of Twin Cities households don’t have Internet.  Most common reason: “I don’t need it.”  Next most common: “Too expensive” for rural; “Has access someplace else” or “Too expensive” for metro.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Why people don’t purchase Internet for their home  A lot appears to depend on age.  30% of all rural households over age 65 responded that they did not need Internet access; 23% in the Twin Cities.  13% of rural 18- to 34-year-olds said it was too expensive, compared to 1.8% in the Twin Cities.  For those making < $25,000, 33% in rural said they don’t need Internet, 26% in Twin Cities.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Why people don’t purchase Internet for their home  In the < $25,000 income group (statewide):  30% are seniors. They find Internet the least important.  35% are age 18-35. They are the most likely to use mobile devices to access the Internet outside the home.  Both groups likely consider home Internet service optional.© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • The Digital Divide 2.0  As broadband adoption reaches its saturation point in Minnesota, there are three main takeaways.  Remaining non-adopters  The mobile Internet  Speed© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Remaining non-adopters  The remaining non-adopters can be characterized in three ways.  Attitude  “I don’t need Internet”  “I wouldn’t know how to use it”  Affordability  “It’s too expensive”  Alternatives  “I can get it someplace else (for free)”© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • The mobile Internet  Portable devices make it easy to access the Internet away from home  Nature of access is changing  Changing expectations on access  No longer necessary to buy home access, at least for a fixed location  Affects providers, consumers, businesses, policy makers  Fewer rural consumers using Internet outside the home: fewer options?  3g vs 4g cell phone service© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • Speed  Bandwidth is still a function of location  Demand for bandwidth is only going up  Today: Streaming video services, online gaming  Tomorrow: Education, health care and business promise to be large users of bandwidth  Communities that cannot add capacity will fall behind as new technology goes from fantasy to reality© Center for Rural Policy & Development
  • 2012 Minnesota Internet Survey To find out more about the survey and to download a copy of the report, visit our web site at www.ruralmn.org© Center for Rural Policy & Development