Taking A Strategic Approach to Social Media
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Taking A Strategic Approach to Social Media

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Presentation given at Social Media Academy's Facebook Conference, 8th December 2010

Presentation given at Social Media Academy's Facebook Conference, 8th December 2010

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  • Quick survey around the room to establish personal level of involvement in social media
  • Pulse of nation = 18,000 consumer panel Aisle Spy = blog & web cams & video Bright Ideas = money saving (5% of savings)
  • Pulse of nation = 18,000 consumer panel Aisle Spy = blog & web cams & video Bright Ideas = money saving (5% of savings)
  • Pulse of nation = 18,000 consumer panel Aisle Spy = blog & web cams & video Bright Ideas = money saving (5% of savings)
  • The brief called for provocation & inspiration In spirit of biting the hand that feeds me … I will start by attacking the title
  • Authority has been Dispersed Traditional authority figures – business leaders, politicians etc – have plummeted in the trust stakes over the past decade. The Edelman Trust Barometer bears witness to this – in some countries, trust in the CFO is as low as 20%. Meanwhile, trust in corporate advertising (13%) and corporate websites (24%) is also sinking fast – as the authority of (fellow) employees, peers, friends and family (40%) continues its inexorable rise. Engagement with audiences now needs to be through multiple voices and multiple channels – latest Trust data suggest five times/ five people/ five places. Messaging style, content and tone needs to be adapted accordingly. The democratising shifts in the wider world is reflected in the world of media, too. Media ‘authority’ has passed from newspapers to the internet and, to an extent, from the written word to filmed content. In the US in 2008, more people relied on the internet (40%) for news, than on newspapers (30%); 79% of all adults are now on-line – for an average of 33 hours per week. People visit 114 domains and 2,500 web pages per month. Today, 100 million people will watch videos on YouTube. Mobile is equally important. 40% of Americans will SMS someone today, just as Twitter is increasingly mobile. Meanwhile, billions of e-mails will be deleted without even being read. Not only has authority been dispersed, but also it is fragmented and occasionally ignored altogether whatever or wherever the source.
  • Authority has been Dispersed Traditional authority figures – business leaders, politicians etc – have plummeted in the trust stakes over the past decade. The Edelman Trust Barometer bears witness to this – in some countries, trust in the CFO is as low as 20%. Meanwhile, trust in corporate advertising (13%) and corporate websites (24%) is also sinking fast – as the authority of (fellow) employees, peers, friends and family (40%) continues its inexorable rise. Engagement with audiences now needs to be through multiple voices and multiple channels – latest Trust data suggest five times/ five people/ five places. Messaging style, content and tone needs to be adapted accordingly. The democratising shifts in the wider world is reflected in the world of media, too. Media ‘authority’ has passed from newspapers to the internet and, to an extent, from the written word to filmed content. In the US in 2008, more people relied on the internet (40%) for news, than on newspapers (30%); 79% of all adults are now on-line – for an average of 33 hours per week. People visit 114 domains and 2,500 web pages per month. Today, 100 million people will watch videos on YouTube. Mobile is equally important. 40% of Americans will SMS someone today, just as Twitter is increasingly mobile. Meanwhile, billions of e-mails will be deleted without even being read. Not only has authority been dispersed, but also it is fragmented and occasionally ignored altogether whatever or wherever the source.
  • Typical of Antony Gormley’s work Negative reaction of National Gallery head, Nicholas Penny

Transcript

  • 1. The State of Play
  • 2. Smell the Hype The Only Way is Up When was the last time someone made a film about Rupert Murdoch?
  • 3. Answering Every Commercial Problem?
    • Track sentiment & provide advance warning
    • Rally supporters & m obilise/inspire internal audience
    • Engage critics
    • Facilitate stakeholder involvement in product, policy or service development
    • Drive SEO performance
    • M easure effectiveness of/response to other comms
    • Supercharge customer relations
  • 4. Numbers are Compelling
    • 70% of companies regularly create value through use of web-based communities
    • Using customer communities to solve customer problems costs 10% of traditional call centres
    * McKinsey 2010
  • 5. Reinventing Democracy?
  • 6. Get ready for the backlash Gartner Hype Cycle Peak of Inflated Expectations Trough of Disillusionment Slope of Enlightenment Plateau of Productivity
  • 7. Changing Patterns of Behaviour & New Expectations
  • 8. Supercharged Activism
  • 9. Supercharged Consumerism
  • 10. Heightened Expectations
    • Speed & responsiveness
    “ The trouble with McDonald’s is it’s too bloody slow” Instant access, instant response, instant gratification “ living life through shortcuts” MTV
  • 11. “ Amplifying the Volume of Moaning”
  • 12. Amplifying the Damage Caused by Internal Moaning
    • “ R ude, smelly and stupid”
    • “ Pikey skanks”
    • “ Chavs” “Poor safety standards”
  • 13. Placing a Premium on Judgement
    • The crowd isn’t always wise or right
      • Mobs of misinformed zealots are no more legitimate when they appear online
    • Should you always give people what they say they want?
      • Populism is a weakness … whereas taking a stand on unpopular or controversial issues can be a sign of strength
  • 14. Being Strategic
  • 15. The value of being strategic
    • Solving real problems e.g. trust deficit
    • Moving up the value chain
      • Becoming central to your company’s future
      • Following the serious money
      • Safeguarding your future
  • 16. The danger of staying tactical
    • Irrelevance/insignificance
    • Senior management disinterest
    • Lack of influence
    • Low budgets
  • 17. Being Strategic
    • Avoid fixation with tech, tactics & trivia
    • Understand socio-cultural context
    • Empathise with organisation’s challenges
    • Understand marketing context
  • 18. Boring is good "Tools don't get socially interesting until they get technologically boring.“ Clay Shirky
  • 19. Short-term triumph of the trivial
  • 20. Don’t get so carried away by unlimited possibilities of social media … that you lose sight of real business objectives
  • 21.  
  • 22. Being Strategic
    • Avoid fixation with tech, tactics & trivia
    • Understand socio-cultural context
    • Empathise with organisation’s challenges
    • Understand marketing context
  • 23. Socio cultural shifts Trust deficit Death of deference +
  • 24. Cynicism is our default setting How much do you trust to do what is right (Informed adults in UK)?
  • 25. Authority Dispersed
    • “ End of the expert”
    • Traditional authority figures no longer credible
    • Continued rise of ‘regular’ people (employees, friends, peers) as sources of trusted authority
  • 26. Socio cultural shifts Self expression
  • 27. Art for Facebook generation
  • 28. Socio cultural shifts Self expression + Collective action
  • 29. The spirit of collective action
  • 30. When self expression meets collective action
  • 31. When self expression meets collective action
  • 32. Economic altruism “ people like to create & wish to share. A surprising amount of useful, creative or expressive activity is generated without any financial incentive at all”
  • 33. Organisation without Organisation
    • No permanent office
    • No paid employees
    • Armed with a sophisticated understanding of new technology & an army of enthusiasts
  • 34. Organisation without Organisation
  • 35. Loose, informal alliances
  • 36. Loose, informal alliances
  • 37. Evolution of Crowdsourcing Customising Contributing Creating Solving Collaborating
  • 38. Collaborative Journalism “ mutualisation” = “getting readers to care about, inform and enhance our coverage” Meg Pickard
  • 39. Socio cultural shifts Self expression + Collective action + Subversion
  • 40. The Age of Subversion
  • 41. The Age of Subversion
  • 42. Subverting Business
  • 43. Powered by new technology
  • 44. Being Strategic
    • Avoid fixation with tech, tactics & trivia
    • Understand socio-cultural context
    • Empathise with organisation’s challenges
    • Understand marketing context
  • 45. Social Media Success Built On
    • Being responsive
    • Being human
    • Being open
  • 46. Social Media Success Built On
    • Being responsive
    • Being human
    • Being open/transparent
    • What is typical
    • Slow & bureaucratic
    • Faceless
    • Opaque
  • 47. Why many institutions struggle
    • Not configured to work in real time, in terms of speed or resources
    • Uncomfortable in a world where judgement more important that fixed rules & processes
    • Nervous about letting real people on the inside talk to people on the outside … lack of trust
    • Don’t like criticism
    • Struggle to define what success looks like
    • Feel out of control
  • 48. Organisational Challenge Disconnected Organisation Connected Customer meets
  • 49. Connected Customers
    • Expect to be able to scrutinise, debate issues & share ideas
    • Expect institutions to be able to respond in real time
  • 50. Social media dramatises the disconnection
    • Reveals silos
    • Highlights trust deficit
    • Underlines structural/ operational weaknesses
      • Decision making
      • Speed
      • Legal constraints
    Need to address fundamental structural, organisational & cultural weaknesses
  • 51. Ignorance is no excuse “ We would love to go on Facebook and we have been having a discussion around that, but it is uncharted territory ” (HSBC Executive)
  • 52. … but empathy is needed
    • Structures & operational procedures need to be transformed
    • Roles need to be re-invented
    • Business models need to evolve
    • Legal guidelines need to change
    • … all of which will take time
  • 53. Being Strategic
    • Avoid fixation with tech, tactics & trivia
    • Understand socio-cultural context
    • Empathise with organisation’s challenges
    • Understand marketing context
  • 54. “ People don't want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole!” Theodore Levitt, Harvard Business School
  • 55. Clients don’t need a Facebook strategy They don’t even need a social media strategy … they need communications strategy … or customer engagement strategy … with social media at its heart
  • 56. Being Strategic
    • Avoid fixation with tech, tactics & trivia
    • Understand socio-cultural context
    • Empathise with organisation’s challenges
    • Understand marketing context
  • 57. www.crowdsurfing.net #crowdsurfing