5Qs With Sanjay Dholakia of Crowd Factory
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5Qs With Sanjay Dholakia of Crowd Factory

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One big trend we're seeing is companies looking to add social to all their programs, moving away from the "walled garden" approach. Companies started doing social by creating closed communities on ...

One big trend we're seeing is companies looking to add social to all their programs, moving away from the "walled garden" approach. Companies started doing social by creating closed communities on their websites. Then, along came the “social graph” and all efforts shifted to Facebook Fan Pages or tweeting on Twitter. Now we're seeing companies trying to add a quantifiable social connection and to boost ALL of their online and offline campaigns. Marketers are looking for ways to embed social into the consumer experience of all their promotions and campaigns. We're also seeing an increased focus on data about customers and influence. A marketer's main job has always been to bring more customers to a company’s products and services – as part of that effort, marketers have always tried to learn as much as possible about the prospects and customers they were trying to serve. What many marketers are beginning to realize is that social could help them develop a deep database of demographic and behavioral information that they just don’t have today. And they're looking for ways to do this in an "opt-in" fashion so they don't have to worry about the privacy issues that dog other efforts. They are realizing that they want to actually “see and measure” word-of-mouth impact with social: who is carrying my message and who is responding as a result? Finally, measuring and showing ROI on social activities has become an absolute imperative. Companies’ initial efforts in social media were very basic, but they're now realizing that they must tie social marketing to real value and results. According to a recent study by the Altimeter Group, creating ROI measurements is the #1 social strategy objective for 2011.

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5Qs With Sanjay Dholakia of Crowd Factory 5Qs With Sanjay Dholakia of Crowd Factory Document Transcript

  • Get DIGIDAY in your Inbox every morning Subscribe Follow DIGIDAY SearchHome Social Data Mobile Local Video Publishing 5Qs With Sanjay Dholakia of DIGIDAY: on Facebook Crowd Factory Like by Carla Rover on Tuesday, February 1, 2011 1,024 people like DIGIDAY:. Jonathan Stacy Cliff Andrew AdamSanjay Dholakia, CEO of Crowd Factory, a leading social targeting platform, spoke withDIGIDAY: DATA about how the significance of data is changing the face of social marketing. Donna Aimee Ashley Joe MaryWhat trends are you seeing in the use of data in social marketing?  Facebook social pluginOne big trend were seeing is companies looking to add social to all their programs, moving awayfrom the "walled garden" approach.  Companies started doing social by creating closed communities on their websites.  Then, along came the “social graph” and all efforts shifted toFacebook Fan Pages or tweeting on Twitter.  Now were seeing companies trying to add a quantifiable social connection and to boost ALL of their online and offline campaigns.  Marketers are looking for ways to embed social into the consumer experience of all their promotions andcampaigns. Were also seeing an increased focus on data about customers and influence.  A marketers main job has always been to bring more customers to a company’s products andservices – as part of that effort, marketers have always tried to learn as much as possible aboutthe prospects and customers they were trying to serve.  What many marketers are beginning to realize is that social could help them develop a deep database of demographic and behavioralinformation that they just don’t have today.  And theyre looking for ways to do this in an "opt-in"fashion so they dont have to worry about the privacy issues that dog other efforts.  They are realizing that they want to actually “see and measure” word-of-mouth impact with social: who iscarrying my message and who is responding as a result? Finally, measuring and showing ROI onsocial activities has become an absolute imperative.  Companies’ initial efforts in social mediawere very basic, but theyre now realizing that they must tie social marketing to real value andresults.  According to a recent study by the Altimeter Group, creating ROI measurements is the #1 social strategy objective for 2011. How are some of your customers measuring value? One way of measuring value is by looking at the reduction in customer acquisition costs.  A customer that used to cost them a few dollars to acquire through Google AdWords might nowonly cost 50 cents through social.  For example, one of our customers -- a leading global mediaagency -- used Crowd Factory to provide a social and viral lift for a contest run by a Fortune 50client. Not only did Crowd Factory provide an uplift of 73 percent in traffic and responses for thecontest compared to the online ad campaign, but the company did it for a tenth of the cost –delivering over 700% ROI. Others measure the dollar value of purchases or conversions made byconsumers coming to them through the social channel.  For instance, with one retailer, we saw all sources of consumer traffic yield a 1% conversion rate, while the conversion rate through thesocial channel was 3 to 5% -- a 300% ROI on average. These are just two measurements out ofmany - others include improvement in cost per lead, an increase in page views or in unique usersif they are a CPM-based revenue site. 
  • What are some creative or unconventional ways customers are adding social component totheir marketing?We see lots of different ways marketers are using social media – again, the key is that they areintegrating it into the rest of their campaigns. More and more companies are looking to launchsocial contests, promotions and coupons and reward their customers for playing an activepromotional role. For example, one customer is launching collective buying for a space travelcompany by giving away a free trip to space.  You can enter once by registering for the site, enter again each time you refer a friend and also get one entry for each dollar you spend on thesite. Another is launching a social campaign around the Oscars: vote for who you think will winbest picture, best actress and best actor, and share this out to your network of friends, starting aconversation around who should win. The share will enter you in a giveaway for an iPad, and thecampaign will also create stickiness to the site to come back during the Oscars to see who won. What are the most important criteria for agencies and brands to judge if a data-drivencampaign will be effective?This depends on the agency or brand, but most would agree that conversions are still king. People want to know: did we bring more people to the campaign than we would have otherwise?  Did we do it at a lower cost? Did we learn something new about our target consumers and who they are influencing? Did we sell incremental product? Any parting shots?I see our current market opportunity in a very similar light to that of Google.  Ten years ago, there was a fundamental revolution in web behavior called "Search."  And, everyone knew intuitively that it could be powerful for brands.  If someone was searching for "car" and GM showed up, that would be a good thing, right?  But, how could a marketer actually spend against that goal and measure it?  That was the genius of AdWords when it was introduced – themarketer finally had a way to spend on Search, know exactly what they were getting back forthat investment, and have control of the dial.  If you fast-forward 10 years, there is a newrevolution in web behavior called Social."  And, again, intuitively everyone knows it could be powerful for brands.  But, no one has known how to spend against it and measure it-- until now.A marketer can embed social into all of their campaigns, see that activity connect to conversionevents and control that data.Related StoriesSocial Change: Crowd Factory Lands $6.5 MillionPost a commentName*:Email*:Comment*:Verificationcode*: We need to make sure you are a human. Please solve the challenge below, and click the Im a Human button to get a confirmation code. To make this process easier in the future, we recommend you enable Javascript. Type the two words: Try another challenge Get an audio challenge Help Im a human
  • Add commentComments (1)February 2, 2011, 03:16 PMNataliya Yakushev: I believe that the "social share" function will only be successful for the productsand services that already have proven track of organic customer referrals. Incentives and rewards torecommend product to friends may only take you so far. The bottom line - offer product that people willbe naturally inclined to recommend their friends and offer a robust platform for sharing. About Us | Advertising | Subscribe | © DIGIDAY:DAILY, 2011. All rights reserved. Custom Web Development by NPGroup, LLC.