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Web2.0 & Social Work
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Web2.0 & Social Work

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A look at social networking and social work from an ethical and marketing perspective.

A look at social networking and social work from an ethical and marketing perspective.

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  • Talk about social media/social networking
  • We’ll talk more about these later
  • A place for everyone and everything
  • Everything we’ll talk about can be used for you personally as well as for an organization. Part of being a professional is networking with other people (which is like marketing). The web is increasingly one of the first places people go to find out about an organization. Networking is important for both you and your organization. We’ll talk more about the balance of personal and professional on social networks later.
  • Does this make you feel a little overwhelmed about social networking? It can be as simple or complicated as you make it. First figure out who you are trying to reach – what is your purpose? What is your niche? Who is your target audience and where are they at? Start there. Create a personal profile and figure out the norms and expectations of the community and then build an organizational profile. Lots of businesses and nonprofits don’t understand a network and make fools of themselves.
  • It is important to be careful and understand your and your organization’s tolerance for risk. As an employee they can’t prevent your private use of a tool, except on work time, but information off your profile can (and increasingly) will impact hiring decisions and upward mobility.
  • I found an article in the New Social Worker Magazine that looked at the ethical implications of Facebook and highlighted 4 areas from the NASW Code of Ethics. These thoughts relate across the spectrum of social media.
  • You probably wouldn’t share details about a recent vacation with a client, so you don’t want them seeing your pics/etc on Facebook. Think about the boundaries that exist offline and apply them online, even with former clients. Keep these same things in mind when you click “Friend” for co-workers and your boss.
  • In my opinion every professional should have a linked in profile. More and more professional networking is also occurring on Facebook. LinkedIn = formal networking; Facebook = golf course networking Some of these tools are important for every organization to think about, specifically from a marketing perspective.
  • Facebook is a place to connect with your friends. Just remember the privacy and ethical issues we talked about earlier. Once you start connecting with friends in your professional network you need to be more careful. What about the prof who you need a reference from? As popularity increased, it has become an important networking tool – even for sharing resources and information. More and more middle-aged adults are joining. Learn how to set privacy controls if you think you’ll need them. Don’t friend clients – think about your co-workers/boss and ultimately your professional image.
  • Groups are the original way to market on Facebook – TOS Orgs not allowed to have profiles. I’m not a fan of using groups as marketing. Pages are much more effective. They provide more options from a marketing strategy and I think are easier to use than groups. Causes is a great way to let others raise awareness and fundraise for you! It is easy to make viral and allows for some branding. Apps are probably the most complicated but can be effective – especially from an advocacy standpoint. http://www.facebook.com/worldvision?v=wall
  • LinkedIn is the stodgier more formal place for networking. It can be fun and has some custom ability – such as adding slideshare, books, blogs, etc. It is like a digital resume, with the ability to get references and status updates. Try to only connect with people you know so that your network is more powerful for you. Headhunters are there looking.
  • Blogging can be a great marketing tool. Your organization can be seen as a thought leader or even a valuable resource, by sharing and creating great information and content. It needs to have a real human feel and voice to it to be effective. Some suggestions from New Social Worker Online are to blog personally. Be sure that anything you say doesn’t identify clients or other confidential information. You can password protect posts if needed. Also be careful with sensitive location information about events, etc.
  • Twitter is like texting a lot of your friends all at once. Connect with people around the world and in your backyard. It is all about how you use it. For example the Chronicle of Philanthropy and NASW are on Twitter. But so is Brittany Spears. You can make it a great professional networking tool while sharing tidbits about your life. Some of the information for this presentation originated from being on Twitter. You have a little control of privacy through locking and blocking, but otherwise everything is out there.
  • Again think marketing.. Most large nonprofits are on twitter and connecting with partners, distributing information about events and the org and other relevant orgs. It is also a great way to hear what people are saying about you and you can engage them. More companies are doing customer service through Twitter – Qwest, Comcast, WarnersStellian. Make it real and make sure it isn’t all about you. Share the wealth.
  • Bleh.
  • Talk about each…

Transcript

  • 1. Web 2.0 & Social Work
    Nick Cross, MSW
    2009 NACSW Conference
  • 2. Objectives
    To share the importance of being on web 2.0 platforms
    To help navigate the most important ones
    To provide helpful background and context about web 2.0
    To address concerns (ethics/privacy/etc) about using web 2.0 professionally
  • 3. Web 2.0 A Short List
    Facebook
    Myspace
    LinkedIn
    Delicious
    Twitter
    SlideShare
    Ning Groups
  • Web 2.0
    Facebook
    Myspace
    LinkedIn
    Delicious
    Twitter
    SlideShare
    Ning Groups
  • So What?
    Marketing
    Personal
    Organization
    Networking
    Job Hunting
    Connecting Resources
  • 12. Be Strategic
    Overwhelmed?
    Plan, Prioritize, Act
    Purpose
    Niche
    Audience
    Test out a few (personally)
  • 13. Privacy & Ethics
    Be careful!
    But, not a Luddite!
  • 14. Ethics
    4.03 Private Conduct
    Profile can be viewed by everyone
    Google yourself
    Manage your image
    Privacy settings
    Friends tagging you
    Clients
    1.07 (a) Privacy & Confidentiality
    Don’t friend clients
    Don’t search for clients
    Ask – use it as a therapeutic tool
  • 15. Ethics
    1.06 (c) Conflicts of Interest
    Boundaries
    Clients
    Former Clients
    Co-Workers/Boss
    Client Considerations
    Find Support
    Painful Memories
    Rejection
    Unhealthy Comparisons
  • 16. “Social Work is a profession based on relationships. I believe that functional and healthy relationships occur best face-to-face and in real time. And yet, a technological world is the world in which we live. As social workers we should be aware of all of its obstacles and embrace all that it has to offer.”
    - Traci Bartley Young, LCSW Facebook: Ethical and Clinical Considerations.
  • 17. Sample Policy
    Minneapolis Public School District staff refrain from using social networks sites such as Facebook or MySpace to communicate, collaborate or contact students and parents.
    That staff use their district email account to correspond with students and parents regarding school assignments and activities.
    That staff use school owned web sites for posting assignments instead of Facebook or MySpace.
    That staff carefully consider what personal information they display in their public social network profile and what comments they make in online public forums.
  • 18. For Everyone
    LinkedIn
    Facebook
    Blog
    Twitter (?)
    NOT Myspace
  • 19. Facebook
    Very Personal
    Professional Tool
    Privacy
    Ethics
  • 20. Facebook for Orgs
    Groups
    Pages
    Causes
    Apps
  • 21. LinkedIn
    Strictly Professional tool
    With your personal flair
    Network - Connect
  • 22. Dynamic Newsletter
    Community Resource
    Build a Voice
    Let yourself come out
    Reflective practice
    Highlight social work
    Ethics & Privacy
    Blogging
  • 23. Twitter
    What is it?
    Great tool
    Resources
    Connections
    Collaboration
    Personal vs. Professional
    Action
    Iran Election
    Tsunami
    Privacy & Ethics
  • 24. Twitter for Orgs
    Great tool
    Resources
    Connections
    Collaboration
    Conferences/Hashtags
    Listen
    Engage
    Human (real) voice
    Privacy & Ethics
  • 25.
  • 26. FriendFeed
    Aggregate other Feeds
    Have discussion by topic
    Lots of chatter
  • 27. Others I Use
    Delicious
    Digg
    YouTube
    Flickr
    SlideShare
    Google Groups
    Ning
    Running Ahead
    Yelp
  • 28. Always Something New
    Google Wave
    Who knows…
  • 29. Resources
    My Delicious Library
    NTEN Community
    Beth Kanter
    TechSoup
    The New Social Worker Online
    Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog
    Common Craft Videos
    i.e. “Twitter in Plain English”
  • 30. Contact
    Almost any site I am “crossn81”
    nhcross@gmail.com
    www.delicious.com/crossn81/web2.0