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Reasons to be cheerful? Advocacy and the new government

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"Reasons to be cheerful? Advocacy and the new government" - presentation from Martin Coyle s http://www.croaconference.com

"Reasons to be cheerful? Advocacy and the new government" - presentation from Martin Coyle s http://www.croaconference.com


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Transcript

  • 1. Reasons to be Cheerful?
    Advocacy and the new government
    Martin Coyle
    Deputy Chief Executive
  • 2. about a4a
    Mission: “To ensure a strong and equal voice for all citizens”
    Cover England and Wales
    Provide information, training and developmental support
    Engage with external stakeholders as an honest broker
    Run the Advocacy Quality Performance Mark
    Advocate for advocacy to government
  • 3. Themes from adult advocacy
    Spending cuts
    Statutory duties vs good practice
    Increased emphasis on outcomes
    Professionalism and registration
    Need for more sophisticated monitoring
    What advocacy will be valued?
    What will the sector look like in 3 years?
    Liberating the NHS
  • 4. The voice of twitter
    “So I'm shouting down tory cuts, cheering for the miners, students are politicised and I’m eating wotsits.
    It's the 80s again, innit.”
    It’s not the 80s
  • 5. Recent history
    Massive expansion of the advocacy sector
    Has influenced policy in a large way
    Greater acceptance of people’s right to choose
    Stronger equalities focus
    Quality is stronger
    Enshrined in legislation
  • 6. Early signs - Young People’s Services
    We want all young people to be self-confident, motivated and equipped with the skills they need to succeed in life. We want society to value young people for their achievements and the contribution they make to their communities.
    To achieve this, we need a level playing field of opportunity. So, in time, every 16-year-old will benefit from participating in the National Citizens Service. We also aim to improve support for vulnerable groups, with better intervention to prevent issues such as substance misuse, teenage pregnancy and youth crime.
    We will help local partners look for better ways to empower young people, creating more opportunities for them to engage in local decision making and democracy in their communities. This section contains information about how we plan to achieve these goals.
    www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeoplesservices
  • 7. But it’s early days
  • 8. Straws in the wind
    The DEFICIT
    Big Society
    Localism
    Personalisation
    Health white paper
    Fairness
  • 9. The deficit
    Pressure on spending
    Public sector cuts will be large
    Move towards outsourcing provision
    Blurring of lines between sectors
    Value for money comes into focus
    Proof of impact is needed – anecdotes are not enough
  • 10. "People loved what we did.
    Too few of them liked the idea of paying for it“
    Julian Dobson on the close of New Start
  • 11. The Big Society
    The plan is that there is no plan
    It will be messy
    Could be a cover up for large cuts
    Could be a hopeful rebalancing of state and society
    Could address fundamental mistrust
    Definitely means we have to think about public engagement and role of volunteers
  • 12. Localism
    Which government?
    Who is setting the agendas?
    Contraction or expansion – Mental Health Measure
    Local implementation of statutory obligations
    Know who you need to influence
    Local democratic influence on spending
  • 13. Personalisation
    Not just about personal budgets
    Is meant to ensure all services revolve round the person
    The language of personalisation is the language of advocacy
    “From safetynet to springboard”
  • 14. Health white paper
    “Equity and Excellence”
    “Nothing about me without me”
    Recognition of failure to engage with some groups
    “Excellent services are useless if people are not willing or able to access them”
    GP commissioning consortia
    Healthwatch and ICAS
    Engaged patients save money
  • 15. Are the words changing?
    Coalition commitment to fairness
    Future of EHRC is being considered
    Focus on responsibility as well as rights
    Regulation is downplayed
    Dignity is promoted
    Emotional intelligence or self reliance?
    Empowerment seems to have survived
  • 16. Key messages
    Many government agendas will need advocacy
    We must be better at engaging with the public
    Pressure to demonstrate our outcomes
    Fairness and equity can be served by advocacy
    Demand for services likely to increase
  • 17. Martin Coyle
    Info“@actionforadvocacy.org.uk
    martin@actionforadvocacy.org.uk
    www.actionforadvocacy.org.uk