Once upon a time a workshop on storytelling presentation

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This Storytelling Workshop is designed to help parents and teachers to improve their own storytelling, and also to help them to assist their kids or students to improve their storytelling.
General objective:A value of utilizing stories for education is that stories can present information in manageable, vivid, colorful, and memorable packages. Through stories, children can relate to the material emotionally, because they can identify with the characters and situations in the stories.

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Once upon a time a workshop on storytelling presentation

  1. 1. Once Upon a Time… A workshop on Storytelling By Cristo Leonww.cristoleon.com Hashtag:cristo@cristoleon.com #XtoOUTAWS
  2. 2. About. This Storytelling Workshop is designed to help parents and teachers to improve their own storytelling, and also to help them to assist their kids or students to improve their storytelling. A value of utilizing stories for education is that stories can present information in manageable, vivid, colorful, and memorable packages. Through stories, children can relate to the material emotionally, because they can identify with the characters and situations in the stories.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  3. 3. About. Instructor: Cristo Leon is a BA Actor, Storyteller and keeper of The Toltec Stories. His love for storytelling has leaded him to investigate folklore and to share his findings with children of all ages all over the world.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  4. 4. General objective. To improve the participants skills for reading stories. To better understand the impact that storytelling has had in our life and will have in the lives of our children.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  5. 5. Workshop Outline. (Onword) Module. -Taxonomy of Storytelling • Story Content. • Story Performance. • Types of Stories. • Situations. • The Twelve Elements of a Story. • Turning Points. • After Telling a Story: Tips. • Some Criteria for Good Storytelling. (Storytelling Journals).ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  6. 6. Story Content.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  7. 7. Story Structure: BasicStory Content. Beginning Development End CLIMAXww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  8. 8. Story Structure: Basic The Grim BrothersStory Content. • Rapunzel. • Hanzel and Gretel. • Cinderella • Little Red Riding Hood • Rumpelstinskinww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  9. 9. Story Structure: ClassicStory Content. 3rd 2nd 4th 1st Act Act Act 5th Act Act CLIMAX Day Nightww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  10. 10. Story Structure: Classic AuthorsStory Content. • J.R:R: Tolkien. • C.S. Lewis. • Lewis Carroll. • J. M. Barrie. Animation Studios • Pixar Animation. • Studio Gibli. •Dream Works.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  11. 11. Story Structure: Modern 1 EndStory Content. 4 Present or 2 Past Future 3 CLIMAX Developmentww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  12. 12. Story and Place. • MythologicalStory Content. • Fantastical • Fantasy • Legendary • Realityww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  13. 13. Story and Community. Folklore:Story Content. • The Jersey Devil. • The Shore Ghosts and Other Stories of New Jersey • Weird NJ • Happy Tilliww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  14. 14. Performance 101. To act is to produce:Story Performance. • Breathing/Singing/Moving and Storytelling. • Styles of Speaking in Storytelling. •Acting-out Characters (Role-playing). • Audience-Participation in Storytelling. • Singing-and-moving Stories. • Story “Someday well find it, the rainbow connection. Drawing/Painting/Illustrating/Mapping. The lovers, the dreamers, and me”.- Kermit. • Storytelling accompanied by Illustrations, Puppets, Masks, and Props.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  15. 15. Performance 101.Story Performance. To act is to engage: • Use voices • Use faces. • Imagine the castle • Singing if you can. • Use images. “Son of a building block! Its Woody!”.- Mr. Potato Head. • Use every type of Props. (Specially his/her toys).ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  16. 16. Is good to know. Your kids will 1st tell:Types of Stories. • Traditional stories (folktales, epics, legends, myths, etc); • Experiences from everyday life (and other true, historical stories); and “A graphic novel series about a lunch lady that fights • Original creative stories. (My crime” Jarrett J. Krosoczka. teacher is an Alien)ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  17. 17. Imagination 101: Regardless of whether a storys characters are humans, animals, divinities, aliens, etc -- all stories are aboutSituations. situations. Story listeners can project themselves into these characters, and imagine themselves in these situations. The listeners can consider if they might do things the same or differently from how the characters do things. This gives the listeners and readers practice for living.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  18. 18. The Twelve Elements of a Story. The Elements: 1. The title of the story. 2. Characters mindset (their histories, thoughts, decisions, abilities to follow-through on decisions, actions, etc). 3. Characters ways of speaking. 4. Characters ways of moving. 5. Place. 6. Time (continuous, or jumps, flashbacks?). 7. The storyline (also known as, plot) -- in one sentence. 8. Objects in the story.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  19. 19. The Twelve Elements of a Story. The Elements: 9. Sensory Elements in the story: Smells, Flavours, Colours, Textures, etc. 10. Emotions in the story (for the characters, the teller, and the listeners). 11. If the story is being told by a character in the story: Who is the Narrator, and what is his/her Point of View, Tone of Voice, Attitude, and Style? 12. Point (theme, meaning, moral, message). Elements 1-11 combined produce element 12.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  20. 20. Anagnorisis: From the Ancient Greek: (ἀναγνώρισις) is a moment in a play orTurning Points. other work when a character makes a Critical Discovery, commonly know as Turning Points are also known as Moments of Decision, Moments of Truth, Pivotal Points, Crucial Scenes, Key Scenes, and Dramatic Moments.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  21. 21. Turning Points. Anagnorisis:ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  22. 22. After Telling a Story. Open questions: • What do you remember about the story? • What did you think about the story? • How did you feel about the story? • What did you like about the story? • Might you have a favorite scene in the story? • How do you feel about the ways the characters behaved?ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  23. 23. After Telling a Story. Open questions: • Do you feel the story shows any positive behaviors? (that we should seek to imitate). • Do you feel the story shows any negative behaviors? (that we should seek to avoid). • Might there be something about the story that you might like to change? • What messages, morals, and meanings do you get from the story?ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  24. 24. Tips for good Storytelling. 8 Tips: 1. Throw oneself into telling the story. 2. Use voice modulation. 3. Expression. 4. Visualization. 5. Act. 6. Contact. 7. Dialog. 8. Music.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  25. 25. Storytelling Journals Write and Read (Adults): Final recommendations. • By encouraging your self to write and read more you will encourage your kids to do the same. • Keep a journal of your trips. • Keep a journal of your dreams • Write a blog. • Read more.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  26. 26. Storytelling Journals Write and read: Final recommendations. • By encouraging your self to write and read more you will encourage your kids to do the same. • Write a blog. • Read more. • Keep a journal of your trips. • Keep a journal of your dreams. • Write your adventure book.ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  27. 27. Storytelling Journals Write and Read (Adults):ww.cristoleon.com http://cristoleon.com/blog/photos/autors-for-once-upon-a-time-storeytelling/cristo@cristoleon.com
  28. 28. Foreword Module. -Taxonomy of Storytelling • You learn the importance of Story Content. • You acknowledge the Story Performance techniques. • You know that there are different types of Stories. • You understand the importance of imagination and situations. • We reviewed “The Twelve Elements of a Story”. • You know what a Turning Point is • You received tips to apply after Telling a Story. • You are motivated to write your adventure book (Storytelling Journals).ww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  29. 29. www.cristoleon.com Materials: •To download this presentation use this link • To obtain the materials of authors use this link • Or contact Cristo at cristo@cristoleon.com • If you are into Social Media just Google: Cristo Leon • If you want to find out what people think of this course use the hashtag #XtoOUTAWSww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
  30. 30. Thanks for your time.
  31. 31. References APA: Leon, C: (February 1st, 2013). Up: Love Story. [Video post]. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://cristoleon.com/blog/videos/up-love-story/ K-8 Library Media Specialist. (April 1st, 2011). Prairie Tales and Fairy Tales – Little Red Riding Hood. [Blog post]. Read to me. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://read2me2.edublogs.org/2011/04/01/prairie-tales-and-fairy-tales-little-red-riding-hood/ Pixar. (n.d.). Pixar. [Wiki]. Wikipedia. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pixar Studio Gibli. (n.d.). Studio Gibli. [Wiki]. Wikipedia. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studio_Gibli Dream Works. (n.d.) Dream works. [Wiki]. Wikipedia. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DreamWorks_Pictures Shreck. (n.d.) Shreck main site. [HTML Web page]. Dream works. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://www.shrek.com/ Spoto. M. (May 16th, 2009). Asbury Park grinning icon needs better storage place, preservationists say. [Blog post]. NJ News. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2009/05/asbury_park_icon_needs_better.html The muppet show. (n.d.) The muppet Show. [Wiki]. Muppet Wikia. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/The_Muppet_Show Toy Story. (n.d.) Toy Story. Gallery. [JPG]. Disney Pixar. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://disney.go.com/toystory/#/movies/toystory/gallery Leon, C: (January 13th, 2013). Jarrett J. Krosoczka: How a boy became an artist. [Video post]. TED. Recovered on February 1 st, 2013 from http://cristoleon.com/blog/videos/jarrett-j-krosoczka-how-a-boy-became-an-artist/ Anagnorisis. (n.d.) Anagnorisis. [Wiki]. Wikipedia. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anagnorisis Faulkner, T. (June 21th, 2011). It’s “Time to Vote Tuesday!” 54. [Blog post]. Focused Filmographer. Recovered on February 1st, 2013 from http://thefocusedfilmographer.com/2011/06/21/it’s-“time-to-vote-tuesday”-54/ FataloLustig. (October 12th, 2011). Im your Father – Reaction. [Video]. YouTube. Recoverd on February 1st, 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=bu34JJ77LwY Leon, C. (February 1st, 2013). Authors for Once Upon a Time Storytelling. [JPG post]. Recovered on February 1 st, 2013 from http://cristoleon.com/blog/photos/autors-for-once-upon-a-time-storeytelling/ Twitter. (n.d.) Hashtag #XtoOUTAWS. [Tweet Search]. Twitter. Recovered on February 2nd, 2013 from https://twitter.com/search?q=XtoOUTAWS&src=typdww.cristoleon.comcristo@cristoleon.com
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