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Buprenorphine as an alternative treatment for drug addicts
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Buprenorphine as an alternative treatment for drug addicts

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Buprenorphine as an alternative treatment for drug addicts Buprenorphine as an alternative treatment for drug addicts Presentation Transcript

  • BUPRENORPHINE AS ANALTERNATIVE TREATMENTFOR DRUG ADDICTSRISE Program By: Cristina M. Cruz Irizarry
  • Introduction Since the 70’s methadone has been the treatment used to treat patients that want to get out of opioids. Buprenorphine is a new drug that has been used to treat these patients.
  • Scheme of the Buprenorphine Treatment Initially compress doses of 0.216 mg of buprenorphine was administrated every six hours and was decreasing the doses gradually by 50% every 48 hours until was totally suppressed. At the same time maintenance for 28 patients was administrated using conidine (0.150 mg Catapresan PL ®). Patients were placed under psychological treatment, therapeutics communities, and group therapy among others support groups.
  • Beneficial Effects of Buprenorphine Buprenorphine can restore the immune function and cytokine concentration. Buprenorphine normalized the HPA axis when altered when using heroin. Patients using buprenorphine as treatment shows a reduce withdrawal and craving for heroin.
  • Secondary Effects of Buprenorphine Most of the patients presented nausea/vomiting and dizziness. Other patients presented decreased respiratory rate and drowsiness. Deficiency in salivation. When the dose is doubled the patient can present a close-dependent increase in analgesia.
  • Buprenorphine Treatment DuringPregnancy and After Delivering Buprenorphine treatment is less harmful for the mother and the child. Women is treated with buprenorphine there is no evidence showing that breastfeeding harm the baby, To prevent withdrawal a modification in dose has to be made during pregnancy.
  • Comparing Buprenorphine withMethadone 52% of the healthcare providers view methadone treatment negatively, still the preferred one. If compared to buprenorphine that has only 17% negative review. Patients under buprenorphine achieved sustained abstinence that those participants using methadone. Patients using methadone complained about more side effect that those using buprenorphine.
  • Conclusion One of the motivations is to give a better life style to those patients this aspect must be worked out by the patient and its support group. Buprenorphine offers to science a new tool to treat drug addicts and as the studies presented a safer treatment.
  • ReferencesPaola Sacerdote, Silvia Franchi, Gilberto Gerra, Vincenzo Leccese, Alberto E. Panerai, Lorenzo Somaini. 2008. 606-613:Buprenorphine and methadone maintenance treatment of heroin addicts preserves immune function. Available from www.sciencedirect.comW. Mei, J. X. Zhang, and Z. Xiao. 2010. 808-815: Acute Effects of Sublingual buprenorphine on brain responses to heroin-related cues in early- abstinence heroin addicts: an uncontrolled trial. Available from Neuroscience 170 (2010).Laurence Simmat-Durand, Claude Lejeune, Laurent Gourarier. 2009. 119-123: Pregnancy under high-dose buprenorphine. Available from European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 142.
  • ReferencesHayley Pinto, Vivienne Maskrey, Louise Swift, Daphne Rumball, Ajay Wagle, Richard Holland. 2010. The SUMMIT Trial:A field comparison of buprenorphine versus methadone maintenance treatment. Available from Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. July 2010.Rolley E. Johnson, Paul J. Fudala, and Richard Payne. 2005. 297-326: Buprenorphine: Considerations for Pain Management. Available from Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. Vol. 9 No. 3 March 2005.Judith Martin. 2006. Pregnancy and buprenorphine treatment. Available from PCSS Guidance at http://www.naabt.org/documents/PCSSPregnancy.pdf