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Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
Social Media for research
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Social Media for research

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  • \nVoltaire as an example of the statement above. The Philosopher was probably one of the most networked scholars of his time, with more than a thousand European correspondents\nNetworks of correspondence was quite useful during the Classic Age as a form of establishing and maintaining connections with the outside world in a rather informal, yet meaningful way. Other thinkers of that time also made use of the Epistolary genre to establish their networks beyond their local whereabouts: Erasmus and more recently Darwin \nCheck Republic of Letters: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw0oS-AOIPE \nCharles Darwin corresponded with over 2000 individuals worldwide, exchanging his views on scientific matters, his health and family life... in http://great-scientists.suite101.com/article.cfm/charles_darwins_letters \n\nRead more at Suite101: Charles Darwin's Letters: Darwin Correspondence Project Expands his World Wide Web http://great-scientists.suite101.com/article.cfm/charles_darwins_letters#ixzz0p5hMEPG6\n\nDarwin corresponded widely, asking for information and opinions, checking facts. He was very scrupulous in giving credit, just look at the footnotes in his books. But actually the flow was not one-way. Yes, Darwin was a phenomenal networker. He would probably have had a blog. in http://agro.biodiver.se/2009/02/blogging-the-big-birthday-darwin-the-seed-networker/ \n
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  • Transcript

    1. Research in adigital world
    2. your thoughts...
    3. rk er s! Net wo Erasmus Voltaire Darwin(1466 – 1536) (1694 – 1778) (1809 – 1882)
    4. Digital Scholarship why? your thoughts...
    5. 4 dimensions
    6. http://www.flickr.com/photos/susanvg/3382838948/sizes/l/ collaboration
    7. tools:co-writing google docs zoho.com•papers & reports•project proposals•surveys•presentations•etc
    8. ‘synchronous’ co-writing googledocs(or typewith.me) & skype(or google talk)
    9. live discussion web telephony skype as a(n) (a)synchronous group channel ... a great tool forresearch interviews
    10. collecting tool: diigo.comresourcessharing bookmarksannotating webpageshighlighting textsetc
    11. taking notes tool: evernote.comdigital notetakingsnapshots ofwebsitestaggingcontentresearchnotesetc
    12. collective tools: ning.com scivee.tvintelligence buddypress.orgsocialnetworksitescollaboratingwith a wideraudienceSharingideas &perspecives
    13. joint projects tools: pbworks.com wikispaces.com wetpaint.com wikis: engaging in a collaborative process; co-developing a web resource...
    14. tool:sharing files dropbox.com
    15. organising tools: mendeley.comreferences zotero.org citeulike.orgcollectorganise&cite yourbibliographicalreferences
    16. communication dissemination
    17. presentation sharingpodcasting twitter blogging
    18. http://tinyurl.com/5c5eck public engagement
    19. http://nogoodreason.typepad.co.uk/no_good_reason/2010/03/is-public-engagement-an-old-media-concept.html
    20. Academics to embrace Wikipediahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-12809944
    21. Don’t only push or pull CommunicateIt’s about dialog!
    22. http://www.flickr.com/photos/56695083@N00/4464828517/sizes/l/ Identity & Reputation
    23. Presence
    24. personal level
    25. but not necessarily on your own!
    26. blog = the hubhttp://www.lisaharrismarketing.com personal, shared reflection of... practice, thoughts in progress, ideas, events.... aggregates distributed presence...
    27. a storyfrom twitter and beyond about Open Thinking
    28. crowd-sourcinginformation open tenure
    29. happy ending http://educationaltechnology.ca/cv/
    30. open discussion
    31. final thoughts
    32. Cultivating a network where to start?
    33. If we were to start designing a strategy for communicationand dissemination  of research from scratch, based on whatis available today, without any constraints of internalstructures or external regulating bodies, what would it looklike? Cameron Neylon, RIN Event (London, November 2010) See discussion here: http://knowmansland.com/learningpath/?p=772

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