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Killer whales and sharks (1)275
 

Killer whales and sharks (1)275

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    Killer whales and sharks (1)275 Killer whales and sharks (1)275 Presentation Transcript

    • Killer whales & Sharks By: Joshua J & Joshua C Yr. 4
    • Killer whales sleep differently. If they are sleeping with their pod, they make a circle and their breathing at the same time and speed. If they are sleeping alone, they go nearer to the shore.The dorsal fin, their blowhole and part of their head will be out of the water. How do killer whales sleep
    • How do sharks sense? Sharks have the strongest sense of smell. Sharks use their nose only for smelling and not for breathing. Some sharks can smell from 50 meters away.
    • What do killer whales eat? They eat turtles, seals, blue whales, fish, squid, sharks, sea lions and sea birds
    • How do sharks hear? Sharks have an inner ear so they hear low pitched sounds in the water.
    • How do killer whales find shelter? Killer whales are animals that don't need any shelter so they don't mind about finding any.
    • What food do sharks eat? All sharks are carnivores so they eat meat like crabs, squids, other fishes and lobsters.
    • What sound to do killer whales make when they are talking to another? Killer whales communicate to each other by making a clicking sound. They usually make the clicking sound when they are hunting for prey.
    • How do shark see (vision)? Most sharks have excellent vision in low light conditioned waters.
    • Bibliography http://www.ehow.com http://www.livescience.com/27431-orcas- killer-whales.html http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/anim als/mammals/blue-whale/