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Mixtures and solutions 3-4A
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Mixtures and solutions 3-4A

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Reaction in a ZipLoc Bag

Reaction in a ZipLoc Bag

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
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  • 1. Focus Question: Are chemical reactions different using a ziploc bag? Mixtures and Solutions Investigation 3-4
  • 2. Reactants=Products• What information does a chemical equation provide?• Is rust the result of a chemical reaction? Explain.• Is burning methane a chemical reaction? Explain.• Write a balanced equation for the burning of propane. C3H8 + 5O2 → 3CO2 + 4H2O
  • 3. Response Sheet - Fizz Quiz• Did he make a mixture?• Did he make a solution?• Did he make a reaction?
  • 4. Content• What does a chemical equation tell you?• How the atoms in the reactants and products rearrange during a chemical reaction.
  • 5. What might happen if you put calcium chloride, baking soda, and water in a ziploc bag?• Procedure – Measure 1 level spoon of calcium chloride and 1 level spoon of baking soda into bag – Close bag except for an opening just big enough to insert the syringe. Press all the air out of the bag. – Use syringe to quickly add 50 ml of water to the mixture in the bag. Immediately zip the bag closed. – Observe as you each take turns holding and gently shaking the bag.
  • 6. Observations• What happened to the bag?• What made the bag puff up like a pillow?• Where did the gas come from?• What did you find out by doing the reaction in the bag that you couldn’t find out doing the reaction in a cup?• How much gas formed as a result of the reaction?• How does the volume of gas compare to the volume of substance you put into the bag?
  • 7. Investigate New Reactants• The calcium chloride and baking soda produced a bag full of carbon-dioxide gas. What other reactants could we use to produce gas as a product?• When you have a plan for a different reaction that you think will produce gas, get the substances you will need. Use no more than 1 level spoonful of any substance.
  • 8. Results• What was different in the reactants between the two bag experiments?• Which reaction produced more gas? How do you know?• What do you think will happen if we do the bag experiment with all three reactants?• List –
  • 9. Homework• Read Summary: Fizz Quiz pg 39-40 and answer Questions.• I-check 3 quiz on Monday, March 18 (14 & 12), and Tuesday, March 19 (15)• Be familiar with the chemical formulas for common substances we’ve used• Be able to write balanced chemical equations in both atomic model and chemical equation form.
  • 10. Homework• Read Summary: Fizz Quiz pg 39-40 and answer Questions.• I-check 3 quiz on Monday, March 18 (14 & 12), and Tuesday, March 19 (15)• Be familiar with the chemical formulas for common substances we’ve used• Be able to write balanced chemical equations in both atomic model and chemical equation form.

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