Introduction to lateral violence

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Bullying is a well known term. Lateral violence is a less well understood term and refers to members of a group or culture bullying their own. Nursing and other healthcare groups are one group that this is commonly found. Aboriginal communities is also a fine breeding ground for this behaviour. Find out why and what you can do to combat it.

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  • Source: Lateral Violence: Nurse Against Nurse, Patricia A. Rowell, PhD, RN, CNP
  • Source: Lateral Violence: Nurse Against Nurse, Patricia A. Rowell, PhD, RN, CNP
  • Source: Lateral Violence: Nurse Against Nurse, Patricia A. Rowell, PhD, RN, CNP
  • Source: Lateral Violence: Nurse Against Nurse, Patricia A. Rowell, PhD, RN, CNP
  • Source: Campaign against workplace bullying 2000 (USA)
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Screaming mimi, person chooses to shame and humiliate in the workplace to try and control the emotional environment, in front of everyone.Two headed snake variety, is the passive aggressive type who will lie about a whole bunch of things they will deny what they said, and then they will destroy the person’s reputation, they will make nice with them, love them and then knife them in the back lull them into safety then crush careers
  • Constant critic type of bully is behind closed doors and what this person does is get that individual who is usually technically competent, usually a veteran worker, very accomplished and well known as the go to person in that organization, they erode the confidence in this person, they call this person incompetent, and this is the first time that this person has ever heard that. They have only heard praise before and perhaps they are 20 25 years into their career But they have this young new supervisor who wants to push them around. Who lacks the talent and calls them incompetent and this can destroy the person. You can take a thoroughly competent person and render them useless The fourth category is the Gatekeeper. This person tries to control the person by withholding resources people need to succeed. Deny people training, ask them to do work outside of their skill level. You can deny people a budget, for something that needs to be funded, Some of the worst tactics we have heard of are people are told to deny relationships with other people. You may not work with her, you may not talk with her. You may not collaborate with her.
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: American Institute on Domestic Violence www.aidv-usa.com
  • Source: American Institute on Domestic Violence www.aidv-usa.com
  • Source: American Institute on Domestic Violence www.aidv-usa.com
  • Source: American Institute on Domestic Violence www.aidv-usa.com
  • Source: American Institute on Domestic Violence www.aidv-usa.com
  • (Griffin, 2004, 259) 
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010Section 35 states” “No worker shall carry out any work if, on reasonable and probable grounds, the worker believes that there exists an imminent danger to the health and safety of that worker.” There is potential for this clause to be used as justification if, for example, a home care worker felt that entering the home of a potentially abusive client might endanger the worker’s own health and safety. Two recent Ontario court cases highlight this potential. In each, the worker won a wrongful dismissal suit after being fired for refusing to engage in work that the worker thought would threaten safety. In one case, involving a female bartender who refused to serve an abusive customer, the Ontario Labour Relations Board ruled that an abusive customer may constitute a sufficient health risk to a worker that there are grounds for work refusal. (Sharon Moore v. Barmaid’s Arms, Ontario Relations Board, March 23, 1995 citied in Lancaster Labour Law Reports, April 1995, p. 1-2.)
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010Human Rights complaintsIn Alberta, Human Rights complaints are covered by the Human Rights, Citizenship and Municipalities Act. To succeed in a claim under this legislation, the complainant must prove that the abuse was a form of discrimination on one of the prohibited grounds — race, religious beliefs, colour, gender, physical disability, mental disability, age, ancestry, place of origin, marital status, source of income or family status. It is important to note that the listed grounds are not fully inclusive. For example, sexual orientation is not listed but is, as a result of a 1998 Supreme Court of Canada decision, now a prohibited ground of discrimination.
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010The Alberta Education Safety Bulletin provides help for employers developing policies, for example the Policy should include the employee’s: Right to assistanceA statement that any person who believes they have been subjected to violence and harassment has the right to access assistance in communicating their objections and, if warranted, in pursuing the complaint more formally. This is particularly important in cases where the alleged offender is in a position of authority, or where there are communication barriers. As a minimum, assistance may be provided by a trained Human Resources representative and may also includesupport by a co-worker, a trained contact person, a union representative or a professional association representative. The procedure should also include a statement indicating that individuals have the right to address their concerns to the Alberta Human Rights Commission. Management of the offenderThe employer must address an incident of abuse in an objective and consistent manner. In substantiated complaints, the following factors should be considered when determining corrective action:(a) impact of the abuse on the victim;(b) nature of the abuse;(c) degree of aggressiveness and physical contact in the abuse;(d) period of time over which the abuse took place;(e) frequency of the abuse; and(f) vulnerability of the victim.
  • Source: Alberta Employment Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • Source: Adapted from Central Health presentation: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference, April 13, 2011
  • References Alberta Employment, Safety Bulletin developed 2006, updated 2010 http://employment.alberta.ca/documents/WHS/WHS-PUB-VAH001.pdfAlberta Occupational Health and Safety Act: http://www.qp.alberta.ca/574.cfm?page=O02.cfm&leg_type=Acts&isbncln=9780779756148Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Regulations: http://www.qp.alberta.ca/574.cfm?page=2009_087.cfm&leg_type=Regs&isbncln=9780779739783American Nurses Association. 2006. Background Report: Workplace Abuse and Harassment of Nurses. Silver Spring, MD: ANA.Central Health Authority. Respect in the Workplace: Defining bullying, harassment and disrespectful behaviour, Healthcare Workplace Safety Conference,April 13, 2011 CONFLICT ENGAGEMENT TRAINING FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, Recommendations for Creating Conflict Competent Organizations, A White Paper for Healthcare and Dispute Resolution Professional, EHCCO ‐ Half Moon Bay , CA 94019 telephone: (877) 712‐1240 DHHS/HRSA/BHP/DON. 2006. The Registered Nurse Population: Findings from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. www.hrsa.gov/bhpr/rnsurvey2000/rn Dunn, H. 2003. Horizontal violence among nurses in the operating room. AORN Journal 78(6): 977-988. Farrell, GA. 2001. From tall poppies to squashed weeds: Why don’t nurses pull together more? Journal of Advanced Nursing 35(1): 26-33. Fogarty, James. Overindulged Children and the Adults They Become, Cross County Seminar, Fairfax, VA, July 14, 2010, per Rowell, PA. Gerberich, SG; Church, TR, McGovern, PM, Hansen, H, Nachreiner, NM, et al. (2005). Risk Factors for Work-Related Assaults on Nurses. Epidemiology 16(5), 704-709. Griffin, Martha. 2004. Teaching cognitive rehearsal as a shield for lateral violence: An intervention for newly licensed nurses. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing 35(6):257-263. International Council of Nurses. 2004. Guidelines on coping with violence in the workplace. Geneva, Switzerland: ICN. Leiper, J. 2005. Nurse against nurse: how to stop horizontal violence. Nursing 2005 35(3):44-45. McKenna, BG, Smith, NA, Poole, SJ, and Coverdale, JH. 2003. Horizontal violence: Experiences of registered nurses in their first year of practice. Journal of Advanced Nursing 42(1): 90-96.McMillan, I. 1995. Losing control. Nursing Times 91, 40-43.Meyers, L. 2006. Worry for a living? Monitor on Psychology 37(7):74-75.  NCCI, Inc. 2006. Violence in the workplace – An updated analysis. http://www.ncci.com/nccisearch/news/research/research-violence-in-workplace-sept06 Randle, J. 2003. Bullying in the nursing profession. Journal of Advanced Nursing 43(4): 395-401. Rowell, Patricia A., PhD, RN, CNP, Lateral Violence: Nurse Against Nurse. Ratner, T. 2006. Communication in the OR. Nursing Spectrum October 23: 10-11. Shogren, E. 2004. Be aggressive toward violence. American Journal of Nursing 104(5): 112. Rizzuto, Anthony. Domestic Violence in the Workplace, presentation to LAP conference Las Vegas July 2012, adapted with permissionThomas, SP. 2003. Anger: the mismanaged emotion. MedSurg Nursing 12(2): 103-110. Victims of Bullies Often Quit, Impacting Production. Occupational Hazards 2004: 14.
  • Introduction to lateral violence

    1. 1. Introduction toLateral Violence Infonex Workshop Calgary9 -10:30 am Aug 23rd Chris Hylton, MA 403 264 5288 chris@hylton.ca CG Hylton 1
    2. 2. Introduction2  Chris Hylton, MA  HR & Benefits Background  Keep being drawn to mental health  Grace Hospital experience  Holy Cross Hospital experience  Workshops, including anti-bullying ones  EAP CG Hylton
    3. 3. Learning Outcomes3 What we hope to achieve today:  Define the issues- bullying as violence and an OHS issue  Identify examples of LV  Understand the effect that this type of behaviour has on your workplace  Understand the organization‘s expectations regarding appropriate workplace behaviour  Identify resolution pathways to deal with LV problems effectively CG Hylton
    4. 4. Agenda4  Definition  Stats  Causes / Effects  Laws  Solutions  Solution Myths  Case Study CG Hylton
    5. 5. This is your show5  Are there any issues you would like me to specifically address in the talk today? CG Hylton
    6. 6. ― Before we can change things, we must call them by their real name.‖6 (Confucius)  Violence is a pervasive part of our lives – on television, in songs, books, on the streets, in our workplaces,  Our workplaces? Some 60% of workplace assaults are concentrated in health services, social assistance, and personal care occupations ( NCCI, 2006). CG Hylton
    7. 7. Confucius would be proud7  synonyms interpersonal abuse, lateral violence, horizontal violence, workplace violence, interpersonal conflict, bullying, anger management CG Hylton
    8. 8. Definition8 lateral violence is ―defined as any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict – ranging from verbal abuse to physical and sexual harassment. CG Hylton
    9. 9. Definition9 The International Council of Nurses (ICN) defines LV abuse as ―behavior that humiliates, degrades, or otherwise indicates a lack of respect for the dignity and worth of an individual‖ (ICN, 2004). CG Hylton
    10. 10. Stats10  about 35% of employees are bullied  Women bullies target women 84% of the time  Men bullies target women 69% of the time  Vast majority of bullies are bosses (81%)  In 70% of cases, the bullying only stopped when the victim quit, was let CG Hylton go or transferred
    11. 11. More stats………………..11  Women are more likely to report bullying  About 1 victim in 100 either attempts or succeeds in suicide  Most people who are bullied report damage to their health  Overwhelming majority of bullies are repeat offenders  Bullying responsible for 1 resignation in CG Hylton 4
    12. 12. Bullying starts early12  A study of student nurses reported that 53% had been put down by a staff nurse (Longo, 2007);  52% reported having been threatened or experienced verbal violence at work (ANA, 2011). CG Hylton
    13. 13. Healthcare Stats13 2005 Stats Can data  34 per cent of the 12,200 respondents reported physical violence;  47 per cent experienced emotional abuse;  According to Work Safe BC, in BC in 2007, violence in the workplace, accounted for 12 % of all WCC claims in health care! CG Hylton
    14. 14. Healthcare Stats14  While patients continue to represent the largest proportion of perpetrators overall, co- workers are responsible for up to 55 percent of all emotional abuse and 53 percent of all sexual harassment CG Hylton
    15. 15. Psychological risk in Cdn workplace % employees reporting15 Sector Serious Significant % Concern Concerns Reporting s Risk Manufacturing 5% 33% 38% Public 3% 29% 32% Administration Health Care & 4% 28% 32% Social Assistance Retail Trade 4% 24% 28% Finance & 2% 22% CG Hylton 24%
    16. 16. Causes of LV16  Research finds a clear link between abuse for patients/residents and the workplace environment. There are higher rates of violence in work areas with short staffing, under-staffing, lack of support from management, and poor teamwork among health care disciplines. CG Hylton
    17. 17. What are Bullying Behaviors?17 CG Hylton
    18. 18. Types of Bullies18 The Screaming Mimi Two Headed Snake CG Hylton
    19. 19. Types of Bullies19 The Constant Critic The Gatekeeper CG Hylton
    20. 20. Workplace Bullying Behaviours20  Verbal abuse  Put downs, humiliating jokes and comments, constant teasing  Yelling, name calling, swearing, snide remarks, sarcasm  Unfair criticism  Negative comments about someone‘s sexual orientation  Unwelcome comments about someone‘s race, religion or background  Threats and intimidation CG Hylton© Human Factor Australia
    21. 21. Workplace Bullying Behaviours21 (cont..)  Non-verbal Abuse  Rude gestures and disrespectful facial expressions  Unfair workloads  Withholding of resources or information needed to undertake work  Unnecessary changes in work patterns or conditions  Denying access to rights or promotions  Isolation and exclusion  Stalking  Displaying offensive material  Leering CG Hylton© Human Factor Australia
    22. 22. Workplace Bullying Behaviours22 (cont..)  Physical Abuse  Unwelcome pranks, horse-play and practical jokes  Invading personal space and stand over tactics  Uninvited touching or brushing against someone  Pushing, shoving, hitting, tripping, spitting  Damage to personal property CG Hylton© Human Factor Australia
    23. 23. EFFECTS of LV23  Reduced efficiency, productivity & profitability  Adverse Publicity/Erosion of Company image  Increased absenteeism  Staff turnover  Costs associated with counselling, recruitment, compensation claims  Legal costs associated with defending civil or criminal charges  Loss of sleep, loss of appetite & low morale  Feelings of anger, humiliation, frustration, depression, stress, powerlessness CG Hylton
    24. 24. Profile of the victim24  Not all weak and incompetent  Better than average performers  Conscientious and diligent  Popular, source of help and advice  Tolerant, do not fight back or retaliate  Strong morals, integrity  Isolated, not part of a clique CG Hylton
    25. 25. What are Disrespectful/BullyingBehaviours?25 Too many to list!!!! Separates target from  Silent treatment co-workers  Labels target as a Excludes from troublemaker participation  Undermining authority Breaking confidentiality  Over-monitoring of work Ridiculing, criticizing  Shaming/ insulting Intimidating  Spreading rumors/ gossip Threats  Overloaded with Sabotaging work deadlines, impossible Minimizing concerns tasks….. CG Hylton
    26. 26. What employees want26 Surveys of Best Practices tell us what employees want in the workplace: 1. Respect 2. Healthy and Safe work environment 3. Trustworthy Leadership 4. Work / Life Balance 5. Sense of Pride and Accomplishment CG Hylton
    27. 27. What is a Respectful27 Workplace It is one where  Employees are valued and have opportunity for input and feedback  Communication is polite and courteous  People are treated as they wish to be treated  Conflict is addressed in a positive and respectful manner  Disrespectful behaviour and harassment are addressed  Anyone work in a place like this? CG Hylton
    28. 28. What is a Toxic Workplace?28 CG Hylton
    29. 29. Toxic Workplace29  Employees are devalued and little opportunity for input and feedback  Communication is non existent, gossipy  People are treated as they wish to be treated  Conflict is not addressed  Disrespectful behaviour and harassment are ignored  Anyone work in a placeCG Hylton this? like
    30. 30. SOLUTIONS30 CG Hylton
    31. 31. If you are an employer where LV is occurring, what do you do, any31 ideas? CG Hylton
    32. 32. Policies and Training32  Policies should have strong opening statements regarding the company‘s attitude to harassment in the workplace  Awareness training among staff is a key strategy in addressing harassment  Zero tolerance approach CG Hylton
    33. 33. Whistleblower protection33  There must also be a policy that protects nurse from retribution if they report violent or aggressive behavior CG Hylton
    34. 34. What else can companies do?34  Managers and supervisors need to play mediators in order to help resolve issues  Offer workshops that build team cooperation  Offer an EAP (Employee Assistance Program)  This program allows your employees to speak to a counsellor about any issues  Can be used as requirement to keep positions if attitudes or issues affect their work and the people around them CG Hylton
    35. 35. Solution Myths35 CG Hylton
    36. 36. It‘s a personal issue36  Myth 1: We dont need to train our staff about domestic violence. That is a personal issue that has nothing to do with the workplace.  Fact: Ignoring effects of domestic violence has a clear impact on org bottom line. Each year, business owners pay out almost $728 million in lost productivity and 8 million paid workdays -- the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.  Six-figure jury awards to victims or co-workers and their estates are not uncommon for employers who fail to properly and adequately address domestic violence at work. CG Hylton
    37. 37. HR can deal with it37  Myth 2: If a victim of domestic violence wants help, we have Human Resource staff available. All the battered worker has to do, is ask!  Fact: Battered workers usually will not approach their employer for help. Research on battered women demonstrates the primary reason the victim does not disclose abuse at home, is fear of job loss or retribution. Remember, her job may represent her only independence from the batterer. CG Hylton
    38. 38. Just fire someone38  Myth 3: It would be easier to just fire a battered worker.  Fact: Trained employees are an asset to your company. The Society for Human Resources estimates that each employee you fire costs you 30% of their annual salary to replace them & train someone else to do their job. It is far less expensive to help your employee obtain the resources s/he needs. CG Hylton
    39. 39. There is no cost to us39  Myth 4: Domestic violence doesn‘t cost my business anything…why should I care?  Fact: Besides the employee absenteeism and lost productivity costs, the costs of intimate partner violence exceed $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health care services, much of which is paid for by the employer. CG Hylton
    40. 40. Your policies40  Are you aware of your workplace policies on Harassment & Workplace Bullying?  How many have a zero tolerance policy  How many still have workplace bullying?  Hope springs eternal CG Hylton
    41. 41. If you are the Ee being41 harassed…  Any ideas please what you should do? CG Hylton
    42. 42. If you are the Ee being42 harassed… Tell the person to stop! Report it to your:  Supervisor/Manager  HR Manager  Field Officer/Trainer Keep a record of the harassment When, Where, Who Saw It CG Hylton
    43. 43. So you have a Bully - what to43 do  Bully‘s are smart they won‘t bully you when others are watching...so write everything down that is said or done.  Do not keep this paper at work, it will be found by the bully.  Watch for the pattern that will appear once you start journaling all incidents CG Hylton
    44. 44. What to do44  Its not each incident that counts, its the number, regularity and especially the patterns that reveal bullying  A bully can explain and/or charm away an incident but it‘s harder to explain a pattern or series of events CG Hylton
    45. 45. What to do45  Keep copies of all letters, memos, emails, etc. Get and keep everything in writing otherwise the bully will deny everything later  Carry a notepad and pen with you to record everything that the bully says and does. CG Hylton
    46. 46. What to do46  Make a note of every interaction with personnel, management, and anyone else connected with the bullying  Expect to be accused of "misconduct" and "unprofessional behaviour" and a few other things when you do this  The bully will be angry and try to discredit you CG Hylton
    47. 47. What to do47  The bully will be angry and try to discredit you  Ask the bully to substantiate their criticisms and allegations in writing by providing substantive and quantifiable evidence CG Hylton
    48. 48. The Bully48  Do not underestimate the bullys capacity to deceive!! CG Hylton
    49. 49. The Action Plan49  Talk to your supervisor  Share your notes  Arrange a meeting with victim, bully and management or 3rd party mediator  SOLVE THE PROBLEM CG Hylton
    50. 50. Break the cycle50  The goal is for the individual, having been educated about anger, self- insight, lateral violence, etc., to help break the cycle of violence by recognizing the abuse aimed at them and choosing to react differently, especially non-aggressively. CG Hylton
    51. 51. Stay calm51  For example if a colleague lashes out at you regarding your opinion on a unit issue, you should hear the person out, think about what and why it was said,  then respond to your colleague in a non- judgemental and non-argumentative tone.  If your colleague‘s anger stays the same, leave the site. CG Hylton
    52. 52. What do you do?52  One of the first steps that must occur is to interrupt the violence.  Although difficult, it is imperative to address workplace violence early and to learn how to confront the person exhibiting the behavior that affects you.  It helps to objectively describe the behavior to the one exhibiting it. CG Hylton
    53. 53. Cognitive rehearsal53 Cognitive rehearsal asks the individual to hold in their mind information that they have just received, rather than react During this time, the individual has the opportunity to process the information, and ponder it, rather than responding immediately. For instance, if a colleague lashes out at you regarding your opinion on a unit issue, you should hear the person out, think about what and why it was said, then respond to your colleague in a non- judgemental and non-argumentative tone. If your colleague‘s anger stays the same, leave the site. CG Hylton
    54. 54. LAWS54 CG Hylton
    55. 55. Laws - Duty of Care55  Employers have a responsibility to ensure the health & welfare of their workers under Workplace Health & Safety Rules  In the area of employment, employers can be held liable for the wrongs committed by their employees in the course of work  Aka Vicarious Liability CG Hylton
    56. 56. Vicarious Liability56 Means that if an employee harasses a co-worker, client, customer, employer can be held legally responsible for the actions of that employee and may be liable for damages CG Hylton
    57. 57. Canadian Anti-Bullying Laws57 2004: Quebec Labour Standards 81.18 The first statutory law against "psychological harassment" 2007: Saskatchewan Occupational Health and Safety Act (Bill 66) The OHS regulatory approach defining bullying as an occupational health risk 2008: Canada Labour Code (Federal) 2010: Bill 168, OHS legislation Ontario CG Hylton
    58. 58. Manitoba newest province to addlegislation:58  Workplace Safety and Health Regulations came into effect Feb 1, 2011  Obligation to protect workers from psychological harassment CG Hylton
    59. 59. Alberta Response:59  Workplace Safety and Health Regulations came into effect 2006  Part 27 of the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Code.  Section 390 of the OHS Code requires employers to develop a policy and procedures respecting potential workplace violence. CG Hylton
    60. 60. Alberta Response60 Section 391 of the OHS Code requires employers to  instruct workers how to recognize workplace violence  communicate the organization‘s policy and procedures related to workplace violence,  develop appropriate responses to workplace violence, and  develop procedures for reporting, investigating and documenting incidentsCG Hylton of workplace violence.
    61. 61. Alberta Rights of Workers61  Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, workers have the duty to refuse to engage in work that they perceive to threaten their safety and health beyond what is reasonable for the job. Section 35  Eg, a home care worker entering the home of a potentially abusive client might endanger the worker‘s own health and safety, could refuse work. CG Hylton
    62. 62. Alberta Suggested Er62 Responses  apology  training  referral to an EAP  reassignment or relocation  limiting access to certain areas of the organization  report to professional body  discipline  discharge  filing a complaint or criminal charges CG Hylton
    63. 63. Alberta - Forms of Legal Action63  Workplace discipline  Professional disciplinary action  Human Rights complaint  Occupational Health and Safety complaint  Civil suit  Criminal or quasi-criminal charge CG Hylton
    64. 64. Workplace Discipline64  This may range from a verbal or written warning in relatively minor cases to suspension, or finally termination for the most serious offences  Progressive discipline normally imposed for offenses not considered serious enough to warrant immediate dismissal  For example, a worker engaged in verbal abuse, a first offense might result in a written warning, a second in suspension and further repetition in termination CG Hylton
    65. 65. Professional Disciplinary Action65  Where alleged abuser is member of a regulated profession, charges of professional misconduct may be brought before the relevant College / Assoc  The College / Assoc must then investigate and, if sufficient evidence is found, a disciplinary hearing would be held  A professional found guilty of misconduct could face one or more penalties, ranging from reprimand to financial penalties or loss of a license to practice CG Hylton
    66. 66. Alberta Human Rights66 Complaint  complainant must prove that the abuse was a form of discrimination on one of the prohibited grounds — race, religious beliefs, colour, gender, physical disability, mental disability, age, ancestry, place of origin, marital status, source of income or family status  Sexual orientation also included as result of 1998 Supreme Court of Canada CG Hylton
    67. 67. Alberta Suggestions for Policies67 Right to assistance statement  anyone who believes they have been subjected to violence and harassment has the right to access assistance in communicating their objections and, if warranted, in pursuing the complaint more formally.  At a minimum, assistance may be provided by a Human Resources representative and may also include support by a co-worker, a trained contact person, a union representative or a professional association representative.  The procedure should also include a statement indicating that individuals have the right to address their concerns to the Alberta Human Rights Commission. CG Hylton
    68. 68. Alberta Policy Suggestion68 Management of the offender  The employer must address an incident of abuse in an objective and consistent manner. In substantiated complaints, the following factors should be considered when determining corrective action:  (a) impact of the abuse on the victim  (b) nature of the abuse  (c) degree of aggressiveness and physical contact in the abuse  (d) period of time over which the abuse took place  (e) frequency of the abuse  (f) vulnerability of the victim Hylton CG
    69. 69. The Typical Organizational Response69  Research demonstrates responses by supervisors/managers to be helpful in less than 20% of cases  The bully suffers consequences in only 13% of cases  Often failure to intervene at all; minimizing problem as ‗personality conflict‘ or reinforcing the behavior by actually promoting the bully CG Hylton
    70. 70. Case Study70  3000 healthcare workers, 2500 female  Central Health developed a VP program over a year in 2009 involved staff and unions CG Hylton
    71. 71. Why Do We Need a Respectful Workplace Program (RWP?71  Negative effects on Employee  absenteeism/ presenteeism  damage to work performance  depression, anxiety, PTSD  impact on victims, witnesses, bystanders  Negative effects on Employer  Recruitment, retention  employee dissatisfaction  loss of productivity  costs including litigation  damage to teams performance  toxic workplaces CG Hylton
    72. 72. Central Health Effect Stats72  Severe anxiety 76%  Poor/disrupted sleep 71%  PTSD 39%  Clinical depression 39%  Panic attacks 32% CG Hylton
    73. 73. Regulatory and Legal Environment73  The increased need for policies and procedures in organizations  governments (Fed. and Prov.)  Healthcare Industry  Post-secondary Institutions  Private Businesses  Legal challenges  In less than 4 years, we have seen damages in Canada go from $15,000 to $950,000.00 CG Hylton
    74. 74. Central Health’s Program Program Development began in Jan./0974 Advisory Committee formed as subcommittee of the Violence Prevention Committee.  unions (NAPE, CUPE, AAHP, NLNU)  non-union, non-management  labour relations  EFAP  management Allocation of resources for 6 month Respectful Workplace Coordinator position CG Hylton
    75. 75. Central Health’s Program75  Information sessions held for all staff  Policy reviewed though VP Committee and OH&S Committees.  Policy implemented in Aug/09  RWP advisors trained Feb/10  Investigation training March/10  Revised policy summer/10 CG Hylton
    76. 76. Respectful Workplace Program76 Based on prevention and early intervention Provides options for intervention and resolution Provides formal and Informal complaints processes Outlines other options available Outlines roles and responsibilities Clear definitions CG Hylton
    77. 77. Respectful Workplace Policy77 “Central Health will promote a safe and respectful workplace for all its employees where disrespectful behavior, harassment and bullying are unacceptable anywhere in our workplace, at any level”. This policy applies to all executive staff, managers, supervisors, physicians, staff, volunteers, students, contractors and all others working or carrying out duties on behalf of Central Health. CG Hylton
    78. 78. Complaints Process78  Informal complaint  Formal complaint CG Hylton
    79. 79. INFORMAL Document discussions, keep copies of correspondence Deal directly with situation Advise options available under RWP program Seek services of RWP advisor Supportive services can be provided Seek EFAP Counselling services assistance RWP program services may be recommended Facts will be gathered. Discuss concerns with program Options for resolution explored. manager, or next Recommendations made. level of management Monitor and follow-up.79 CG Hylton
    80. 80. FORMAL Complaint is forwarded to the VP Complaint is made in writing of HR. Detail events, dates, times, names, witnesses Decision to be made within ten days VP reviews, consults, whether to proceed under the RWP and gathers policy . information. If not proceeding, If proceeding, both the complainant is notified. complainant and the Other options provided respondent are notified. Investigator is assigned Investigator will submit a written report to the VP of HR. Both parties may VP of HR to make a respond decision for intervention80 CG Hylton
    81. 81. Role of RWP Advisors81  To attend training re org‘s RWP policy and participate in Advisors meetings to address skills and discuss issues re role.  Listen to employees who believe that they have been subjected to disrespectful/ bullying behaviors  To explain options for addressing behavior under the policy  To provide support throughout the process (i.e. helping them prepare what to say or accompanying them to see supervisors / EFAP Coordinator) CG Hylton
    82. 82. Respectful Workplace Advisors Role82  To deal with cases in the most confidential matter  To support the monitoring of the program though recording the number of cases in which advisors have been involved  To refer individuals for support where necessary  To model respectful behavior at all times CG Hylton
    83. 83. Employee Family Assistance Program (EFAP) Coordinator‘s83 Role  Consultation with HR, management  Arrange conflict resolution/ mediation services  Policy monitoring and development  Training and awareness sessions (conflict resolution, team building)  Counselling – victims and colleagues CG Hylton
    84. 84. Are we there yet?84  Most organizations are hierarchical organizations, Central Health is no exception  Cultural ―drift‖  Accepting the way things have been  Excusing behaviour  Culture eats policy for breakfast CG Hylton
    85. 85. Remember….85  Addressing and preventing bullying is everyone‘s responsibility.  Supervisors and managers should address disrespectful behavior IMMEDIATELY  Ultimately, it is the employer‘s responsibility to provide a respectful and harassment free workplace CG Hylton
    86. 86. Leadership is key86  Tone is set at the top CG Hylton
    87. 87. You have been a wonderful87 audience  If I may assist you in any way please let me know. CG Hylton
    88. 88. Our offer to you88  Please call if you have any HR, or workplace issue that you are overwhelmed with  We can help you  We also are pleased to do Free Workshops for your organization (some limits apply) Let us know what your needs are and we will make it happen!
    89. 89. CG Hylton - Services HR Consulting  Benefits, Pensions, Job Descriptions EAP  Strategic Planning Salary Grids  Drug and Alcohol Wellness at Work programs Staff Morale  Dept re-orgs Training and  Leadership Workshops compensation Tel 403 264 5288 chris@hylton.ca 89
    90. 90. Thank you for the opportunity to meet today!  HR Consulting  Training  Benefits, Pensions  EAP tel 403 264 5288 chris@hylton.ca CG Hylton 90
    91. 91. Resources91  United Nurses of Alberta Workshops: http://www.una.ab.ca/resources/ohs/workshops  United Nurses of Alberta Report Form: http://www.una.ab.ca/resources/ohs/pdf/OH&Sform.pdf  WBI, US Workplace Bullying Survey: http://www.una.ab.ca/resources/ohs/pdf/2012-05-21-WBI-National-Survey-2010.pdf  American Nurses Association Resolution Workplace Abuse and Harassment of Nurses http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/WorkplaceSafety/Healthy- Nurse/WorkplaceAbuseandHarassmentofNurses-1.pdf  ANA‘s Workplace Violence web page: http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/WorkplaceSafety/workplaceviolence  OSHA‘s Workplace Violence web page: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/workplaceviolence/  References please see notes below please CG Hylton

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