Recommended Immunization Schedules For Children And Adolescents,
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Recommended Immunization Schedules For Children And Adolescents, http://crisbertcualteros.page.tl

Recommended Immunization Schedules For Children And Adolescents, http://crisbertcualteros.page.tl

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • For the evidence based facts and the truth on vaccines I recommend the following: How Vaccines Harm Child Brain Development - Dr Russell Blaylock MD. (Neurosurgeon)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QBcMYqlaDs#t=417 88 minutes
    Read 'Dissolving Illusions, disease, vaccines and the forgotten history' by Dr. Suzanne Humphries to learn the truth about the history of disease http://www.dissolvingillusions.com/
    Read my power point 'Exposing the Myth of Vaccination; Essential Information You Need to Know to be Fully Informed' at http://www.slideshare.net/db61/exposing-the-myth-of-vaccination-essential-information-you-need-to-know-to-be-fully-informed-30978670
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Recommended Immunization Schedules For Children And Adolescents, Recommended Immunization Schedules For Children And Adolescents, Presentation Transcript

  • Recommended Immunization Schedules for Children and Adolescents, 2007 CRISBERT I. CUALTEROS, M.D. http://crisbertcualteros.page.tl
  • 2007 Schedule Major Changes
    • The addition of oral live rotavirus vaccine for routine administration to all infants at ages 2, 4, and 6 months of age.
    • Routine administration of a second dose of varicella vaccine at 4 to 6 years of age.
  • 2007 Schedule Major Changes
    • The addition of human papillomavirus vaccine for girls 11-12 years of age, with catch-up immunization of girls 13-18 years of age. This vaccine, administered intramuscularly in a 3-dose series at 0,2, and 6 months is expected to prevent most cases of cervical cancer and genital warts.
  • 2007 Schedule Major Changes
    • The age range for annual administration of influenza vaccine has been expanded to children 6 to 59 months old. Vaccine is also recommended for close contacts of children 0 to 59 months old.
  • Recommended Immunization Schedule for Ages 0-6 years
  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB)
    • 1st Dose : At birth
      • ALL NEWBORNS prior to discharge.
      • Monovalent hepB
    • 2nd dose : 1-2 months old
    • Final Dose : age ≥ 24 weeks
    • Permissible to administer 4 doses of Hepa B when combination vaccines are given after the birth dose.
    • >90% efficacy; probably 5 years or longer immunity
  • Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV)
    • Minimum age: 6 weeks
    • Schedule: age 2,4,6 months with booster at 4-6 years
    • Dose: 0.5ml SQ
    • >95% efficacy
  • Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV)
    • Indications:
        • Persons with immunocompromised immunity who are unimmunized or partially immunized
        • Household contacts of an immunodeficient individual
        • Unimmunized adults at future risk of exposure to poliomyelitis who have been partially immunized with OPV or IPV
        • Adults at future risks of exposure to poliomyelitis who have had a primary series of IPV
        • Individuals refusing OPV immunization
  • Rotavirus vaccine
    • Minimum age: 6 weeks
    • 1 st dose : between 6-12 weeks of age
        • Do not start the series later than age 12 weeks!
    • Schedule: 2,4,6 months
    • Final Dose : by 32 weeks of age
        • No more than age 32 weeks.
    • Insufficient data on safety and efficacy
  • Diphtheria & Tetanus toxoids and Acellular Pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
    • Minimum age: 6 weeks
    • Schedule: 2,4,6 months with booster as early as age 12 months , provided that 6 months have elapsed since the 3 rd dose.
    • Dose: 0.5 ml IM
    • Administer the final dose in the series at age 4-6 years
    • 100% efficacy/length of immunity for 10 years except pertussis component
  • Diphtheria & Tetanus toxoids and Acellular Pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
    • Pertussis component- not recommended after the age of 6 years because of the increased risk for neuroparalytic reactions.
    • Subsequent doses are not recommended if the previous dose was followed by reactions such as:
        • Collapse
        • Shock-like state
        • Persistent screaming
        • Fever >40.5 C
        • Convulsions
        • Alterations in level of consciousness or other neurologic sx
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB)
    • Minimum age: 6 weeks
    • Schedule: 2,4,6 months with booster at 12-15 months old
    • Dose: 0.5ml IM
    • Possible reaction: pain, redness and/or swelling at injection site in 25%; rarely fever and irritability
    • 90-100% effective
  • Pneumococcal vaccine
    • Minimum age:
        • 6 weeks for PCV (Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine)
        • 2 years for PPV (Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine)
    • Administer PCV at ages 24-59 months in certain high-risk groups
    • Administer PPV to certain high-risk groups aged ≥ 2 years
  • Influenza vaccine
    • Minimum age:
        • 6 months for trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV)
        • 5 years for live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)
    • All children aged 6-59 months and close contacts of all children aged 0-59 months
    • Recommended annually for children aged ≥ 59 months with certain risk factors.
    • For healthy persons aged 5-49 years, LAIV may be used as an alternative to TIV
  • Measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR)
    • Minimum age: 12 months
    • Schedule: 12-15 months with booster at 4-6 years old.
    • MMR may be given prior to age 4-6 years, provided that ≥ 4 weeks have elapsed since the first dose and both doses are administered at age ≥ 12 months.
    • Dose: 0.5 mL SQ
    • >95% efficacy and long-lasting immunity
  • Varicella vaccine
    • Minimum age: 12 months
    • Schedule: 12-15 months with second dose at 4-6 years old.
    • The second dose may be administered prior to age 4-6 years, provided that ≥ 3 months have elapsed since the 1 st dose and both doses are administered at age ≥ 12 months.
    • Dose: 0.5 ml SC
    • Possible reaction: Fever, papulovesicular eruptions in 3%
    • Close to 100% efficacy
  • Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA)
    • Minimum age: 12 months
    • All children at 1 year of age (i.e. 12-23 months)
    • 2 doses should be administered at least 6 months apart.
    • Children not fully vaccinated by age 2 years can be vaccinated at subsequent visits.
  • Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4)
    • Minimum age: 2 years
    • Administer to children aged 2-10 years with terminal complement deficiencies ot anatomic or functional asplenia and certain other high risk groups
  • Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 7-18 years
  • Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap)
    • Administer at age 11-12 years for those who have completed the recommended childhood DPT/DTaP series and have not received a tetanus & diphteria toxoids vaccine (Td) booster dose
    • Adolescents aged 13-18 years who missed the 11-12 year Td/Tdap booster dose should receive a single dose of Tdap if they have completed the recommended childhood DTP/DTaP vaccination series.
  • Human Papillomavirus vaccine (HPV)
    • Minimum age: 9 years
    • 1 st dose : females at 11-12 years
    • 2 nd dose : 2 months after the 1 st dose
    • 3 rd dose : 6 months after the 2 nd dose
    • Administer the HPV vaccine series to females at age 13-18 years if not previously vaccinated.
  • Meningococcal vaccine
    • Minimum age: 11 years for MCV4; 2 years for MPSV4)
    • Administer MCV4 at age 11-12 years and to previously unvaccinated adolescents at high school entry
    • Administer MCV4 to previously unvaccinated college freshmen living in dormitories; MPSV4 is an acceptable alternative.
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV)
    • Minimum age: 2 years
    • Administer or certain high risk groups
  • Influenza vaccine
    • Children aged <9 years who are receiving influenza vaccine for the 1 st time should receive 2 doses
        • Separated by ≥ 4 weeks for TIV
        • By ≥ 6 weeks by LAIV
  • Hepatitis A vaccine
    • 2 doses should be given at least 6 months apart
  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB)
    • Administer the 3-dose series to those who are not previously vaccinated.
    • A 2-dose series of Recombivax HB ® is licensed for children aged 11-15 years
  • Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV)
    • For children who received an all-IPV or all-OPV series, a fourth dose is not necessary if the third dose was administered ≥ 4 years.
    • If both IPV and OPV were administered as part of a series, a total of 4 doses should be administered, regardless of the child’s current age.
  • Measles, Mumps, and Rubella vaccine (MMR)
    • If not previously vaccinated, administer 2 doses of MMR during any visit, with ≥ 4 weeks between the doses.
  • Varicella vaccine
    • 2 doses:
      • Persons without evidence of immunity
      • Persons aged <13 years at least 3 months apart
      • Persons aged ≥ 13 years at least 4 weeks apart
  • addendum
  • Bacillus-Calmette Guerin vaccine (BCG)
    • Given anytime after birth
    • 1 dose : 0.05 mL ID over deltoid area
    • Booster : school entrants (0.1 mL)
    • If given at the earliest possible age protects against the possibility of infection from other family members
    • 50% efficacy
    • Possible reaction: Keloid scar, suppurative regional adenitis; disseminated BCG infection & osteomyelitis in immunocompromised
  • Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)
    • Given at 2,4,6 months
    • Minimum age: 6 weeks
    • 1 st booster: 1 year after the primary dose
    • 2 nd booster: 4-6 years
    • Dose: 0.5 ml orally for single dose preparation or 2 drops for multiple dose preparation
    • Lifelong immunity with >90% efficacy
    • Possible reaction: paralytic polio -extremely rare
    • Advantage over IPV: ease of administration and better intestinal immunity conferment
  • Measles Vaccine
    • Live attenuated virus
    • Given at 9 months or later ; maybe given as early as 6 months
    • 1 dose SQ
    • Booster : 2 nd dose given at 15mos. If 1 st dose given below 1 year
    • 3 rd dose given at 5-12 years as part of MMR
    • 95% efficacy with at least 12 years of immunity
    • Possible reaction: fever and rash 5-10 days after dose
  • Expanded Program of Immunization for Infants (EPI) 1 9 months 5) Measles vaccine 4 weeks 3 At birth 4) Hepa B vaccine 4 weeks 3 6 weeks 3) OPV 4 weeks 3 6 weeks 2) DPT 1 Birth or anytime after birth 1) BCG Minimum Interval Between Doses Number of Doses Minimum age at 1 st dose Vaccine
  • thAnks fOr listEning !