Behavior Management : Student  with a Specialty/ Disability    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)CAROLINA RINCON
FASD    FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder) is an     umbrella term describing the range of effects that     can occur...
Characteristics . These effects can include  physical, behavioral, mental and/or learning  disabilities with possible lif...
 Facial anomalies: short eye slits, smooth or  indistinct philtrum (the ridges running vertically  between the nose and l...
Other important information: The damage of FASD caused by a mother’s drinking during  pregnancy is permanent. Each year ...
Concerns.    Common Learning Challenges: ✿Visual and auditory    processing problems.           ✿Inability to understand...
Cognition and Behavior. Familiar to teachers from experience with other  disorders (such as attention-deficit/hyperactivi...
 Even the smallest distraction in class, the hall, or outside seems to    pull them away from the subject at hand.   Far...
Students Strengths: Many children with FASD are hands-on activities  often are strengths for these students. Most childr...
 Rules of Behavior.    * The child with an FASD may need to be reminded continually about how to    interpret cues and em...
General tips: 1.- Use literal terms. Avoid with double meaning. 2.-Be consistent. Use the same words for key    phrases ...
Support of Proper Behavior. Teachers and other staff, in turn, can reach out to    the child, using specific classroom st...
Intervention when Misbehavior Occurs: Minor Infractions :✿For a child who cannot stop interrupting other students while t...
More Serious Infractions :✿Provide one-on-one supervision during recess and lunch.✿Ask parents what strategies they use fo...
References. http://www.thearc.org/page.aspx?pid=2554 http://www.fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/ www.samhsa.gov
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Behavior management FASD

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BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES OR FASD

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Behavior management FASD

  1. 1. Behavior Management : Student with a Specialty/ Disability Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)CAROLINA RINCON
  2. 2. FASD  FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder) is an umbrella term describing the range of effects that can occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy.  The term FASD itself is not intended for use as a clinical diagnosis. fetal alcohol Spectrum (FAS)alcohol-related alcohol-related birth defects neurodevelopmen (ARBD) tal disorder fetal alcohol (ARND) effects (FAE)
  3. 3. Characteristics . These effects can include physical, behavioral, mental and/or learning disabilities with possible lifelong implications. It is identified by abnormal facial features, central nervous system problems and slowness of growth.
  4. 4.  Facial anomalies: short eye slits, smooth or indistinct philtrum (the ridges running vertically between the nose and lips) and a thin upper lip. Some brain damage to the central nervous system demonstrated through microcephaly (small size of the brain), tremors, hyperactivity, fine or gross motor problems, attention deficits, learning disabilities, intellectual impairments and possible intellectual disability.
  5. 5. Other important information: The damage of FASD caused by a mother’s drinking during pregnancy is permanent. Each year in the U.S., as many as 40,000 babies are born with an FASD. The cost to the nation for FAS alone is about $6 billion a year. Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Have More Severe Behavioral Problems Than Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The good news is FAS is not hereditary and only occurs if a woman drinks alcohol during her pregnancy. Secondary conditions (conditions that occur due to having FASD) often occur later in life, such as inability to live independently or hold down a job, mental health problems, drug/alcohol addictions, failure to develop appropriate sexual behavior and consequent legal problems.
  6. 6. Concerns. Common Learning Challenges: ✿Visual and auditory processing problems. ✿Inability to understand ✿ Lower than average IQ cause and effect ✿Difficulties with planning ✿Poor grasp of abstract and organizing (deficits in concepts (such as time executive functioning) or money) ✿Short-term memory problems ✿Developmental delays ✿Context-specific learning in language, motor, and and difficulty accessing social skills information on demand ✿Difficulty reading social ✿ Difficulty with reading cues for comprehension. ✿ Problems following appropriate behavior multiple directions or rules ✿Poor sensory integration
  7. 7. Cognition and Behavior. Familiar to teachers from experience with other disorders (such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, autism, and traumatic brain injury), since the brain reacts to damage from a variety of causes in similar ways. They may misinterpret (or simply miss) the meaning of gestures, tone of voice, or facial expressions. Poor social skills in elementary age students, such as standing too close and using bad language, may be perceived as simply “acting young for their age.” Immature
  8. 8.  Even the smallest distraction in class, the hall, or outside seems to pull them away from the subject at hand. Far behind classmates Several temper tantrums, often when the schedule for the day has changed unexpectedly. By middle or high school age, they may engage in inappropriate behavior such as touching and stroking others’ hair or clothing. They may be unable to recognize appropriate sexual boundaries, interpreting any attention from a peer as “true love.” They may conduct personal or private activities, such as adjusting their underwear, in public. As they get older, they may be more vulnerable to daily stresses.
  9. 9. Students Strengths: Many children with FASD are hands-on activities often are strengths for these students. Most children with FASD have good expressive language skills. However, they often have difficulty understanding and acting on what is said. Children with FASD often are described as friendly , chatty, and helpful.
  10. 10.  Rules of Behavior. * The child with an FASD may need to be reminded continually about how to interpret cues and emotions. *Difference between appropriate public and private behavior. *Emphasize consistency *Develop a consistent routine in the classroom and stick to it all year. *Minimize transitions and provide clear and specific warnings in advance. *Use a consistent signal (such as, a soft bell, a pencil tap)as a warning that a transition is occurring. Prevention Of Misbehavior: ✿ Reach to Teach: Educating Elementary and Middle School Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) http://store.samhsa.gov/product/SMA07-4222 ✿Show related visuals to reinforce transitions (such as, a book for reading time). ✿Provide a transition buddy for students who must change classes. ✿Share the schedule so that parents can be equally consistent at home
  11. 11. General tips: 1.- Use literal terms. Avoid with double meaning. 2.-Be consistent. Use the same words for key phrases and oral directions. 3.-Repeat, repeat , repeat. Reteach information multiple times. 4.-Follow routine. 5.-Keep it simple. Simple environment with few distractions. 6.-Be specific, step be step. 7.-Provide structure. 8.-Supervise.
  12. 12. Support of Proper Behavior. Teachers and other staff, in turn, can reach out to the child, using specific classroom strategies to assist learning. Shifting attitudes and improving understanding. Learning to translate misbehavior. Changing classroom teaching style. Restructuring the physical space in the classroom.• One-on-one counseling support.• A caring and consistent environment.• Adapting their classrooms and teaching styles for students with disabilities
  13. 13. Intervention when Misbehavior Occurs: Minor Infractions :✿For a child who cannot stop interrupting other students while they are working, give a routine task that involves getting up and moving around (for example, sharpening pencils, going to the office, feeding fish).✿ Give directions by telling students what they should do, rather than what they should not do.✿Reinforce appropriate behavior. Redirect most poor behavior.✿Use immediate short-term consequences clearly related to the inappropriate behavior.✿Place a student at the head of a line to minimize bumping.✿ Early intervention services and an individualized education program in school that includes preparation for transition.
  14. 14. More Serious Infractions :✿Provide one-on-one supervision during recess and lunch.✿Ask parents what strategies they use for appropriate behavior at home.✿Teach personal space (for example, stand no closer to someone else than an arm’s length).✿Teach self-talk for self control. Use very specific short phrases ,such as, “Count to 10 first.”✿Use role-playing or videotaping to help a child see and learn appropriate skills for specific situations
  15. 15. References. http://www.thearc.org/page.aspx?pid=2554 http://www.fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/ www.samhsa.gov
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