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Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning
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Implementing "Plans" for Service Learning

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Preliminary results from service-learning projects on scaling up the supply chain in local and regional food systems, capacitating migrant workers to promote individual and public health, and working …

Preliminary results from service-learning projects on scaling up the supply chain in local and regional food systems, capacitating migrant workers to promote individual and public health, and working with street vendors to improve product marketability and local legislation.

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  • First, a bit of background on Maximizing Freight Movements in Local Food Markets Project - Collaboration of 2 applied research centers based at UW-Madison: CFIRE & CIAS - Their shared interest in focusing on distribution to - improve the sustainability of food transport - increase the economic impact of local food sys. led to a natural partnership- Now in 2nd phase of the project
  • First, a bit of background on Maximizing Freight Movements in Local Food Markets Project - Collaboration of 2 applied research centers based at UW-Madison: CFIRE & CIAS - Their shared interest in focusing on distribution to - improve the sustainability of food transport - increase the economic impact of local food sys. led to a natural partnership- Now in 2nd phase of the project
  • Before we get started, I just wanted to provide you with a quick overview of our presentation today:I’m going to start by providing some planning context for the more localized work that Michelle and Janice will discuss by highlighting the ways that developing sustainable regional food distribution systems can foster:-economic development- Sustainability- Healthy food accessMichelle will discuss work we’ve been doing in the Driftless Region of the Upper Midwest and finally,Janice will present some preliminary findings from research she is doing in conjunction with the Center for Freight and Infrastructure Reseach and Education and the WI DOT.
  • So there are a number of challenges and opportunities before us as we attempt to scale up regional food production and distribution while ensuring that it retain the values and characteristics that make local food attractive in the first place:Sustainability,the retention of local dollars, connection to the people and land that produce our foodREVIEW EACH ITEM
  • READ throughUnfortunately we don’t have time to go into all of these in this presentation, so if like to talk more about any of these items, please come up and see us after the presentationAnd now I’ll hand it over to Michelle 
  • For the past 5 or so years at CIAS, we’ve focused a lot of attention on Tier 2 food distribution of its potential to promote:1. Sustainability2. Economic development3. Improved access to healthy food in both urban and regional areas I’ll take just a few minutes to go into more detail.
  • While direct farm sales data has been a useful way to identify national and regional local food hotspots, they are only telling part of the local food storyAnd this diagram, developed by several of my colleagues at CIAS, attempts to get at what we really mean by local and identify how those values and relationships change as food supply chain lengthen and become more anonymous:So for example, most of us wouldn’t be that excited if 1000 cow dairy farm moved in down the street from us, because its not just the geographic proximity that we’re after, it’s that that proximity is a proxy for other values associated with our food that really matter to us:Its better for the environmentIts better for our local economiesAnd its better for our healthSo just briefly, Tier 0 is personal food production – total transparency Tier 1 is really what most of us think of when we think local food—farmers markets, CSAs—other direct marketing outlets—transparency based on relationshipsTier 2 is the first Tier where the eat isn’t personally producing their own food or procuring it from the producer, but it still retains values we have come to associate with local because 1) it is sourced locally and regionally, 2) strategic partnerships across the supply chain balance risks and profits3) packaging/merchandising likely communicates the production store, TRANSPARENCYCharacteristic of retail food co-ops and producer co-ops, hybrid nonprofits businesses, etc.Tier 3 is large volume aggregation and distribution, product may still be associated with certain production practices such as organic or human raised but there is very little information about farm identity, transparency is less about strategic supply chain partnerships and depends on ecolabel or product claimsTier 4 is global anonymous food production, aggregation and distribution, and the such foods may be more along the lines of what Michael Pollen would call “food-like substances”
  • Over the first half of the last century we moved from food planning that was effectively just trying to keep up with feeding the nation’s growing cities to supply chain and cold storage innovations that made the nationalization of the food system possible.Then as our nations farms got big or got out of agriculture and consolidation across processors, distributors, and retailers combined with expanding international market opportunities paved the way for the globalization of food. But then in the late 90s and early 2000s, consumers started wanting to reconnect with their food and public health practitioners and allied professionals, including planners started expressing concerns about the impact of the globalized food system and the built environment on diet and diet-related disease.
  • Transcript

    • 1. IMPLEMENTING “PLANS” FOR SERVICE LEARNING ALFONSO MORALES, Associate Professor Urban and Regional Planning Affiliate of: The Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, The Center for Freight Infrastructure and Research, The School of Public Health, The Nelson Institute, The Center for Non-Profits, The Collaborative Center for Health Equity, Global Studies, The Center for Transportation Management and Policy, Agroecology, and the Chican@/o Latin@/o Studies Program. Currently PI or CoPI of grants on: Farm2School, Community and Regional Food Systems, Food Distribution and Logistics,
    • 2. An Integrated Approach - I Service and Learning Imply Systems of Ideas and Behaviors. Campus Research Partners include: UW-Madison Community & Regional Food Systems Project A 5-year USDA-funded research project working to identify the characteristics and functions of a healthy community and regional food system and how they contribute to increased community food security Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) Conducts applied participatory research how integrated agri-food systems can contribute to environmental, economic, social, and intergenerational sustainability. Center for Freight Infrastructure Research & Education (CFIRE) Conducts research, education, and outreach to advance technology and expertise in the planning, design, construction & operation of sustainable freight transport systems.
    • 3. An Integrated Approach - II Systems imply conflict and cooperation; goals and habits. Community and Professional Partners Include: Migrant Workers; Cultivate Kansas City; City of Freeport, IL; Vandewalle and Associates (professional planning firm, based in Madison, with a national footprint) The Street Vendor Project of New York City, and etc.
    • 4. Presentation overview Multiple Projects…and Organizational Locations • Professor as researcher. University Grant - Capacitating Migrant Workers – Promoting Individual and Public Health: Economic development, Sustainability, Healthy food access • Morales, Alfonso. 2009. “A Social Currency Approach to Improving the Health Related Quality of Life for Migrant Workers.” Journal of Southern Rural Sociology. 24(1): 92-112. • Professor as teacher. URPL 711 Class Projects, (1) regional food distribution system development and (2), teaching food systems Economic development, Sustainability, Pedagogy of Service Learning • Day Farnsworth, Lindsay and Alfonso Morales. 2011. Scaling up for Regional Food Distribution. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development. 2(1): 1-21. • Greenstein, Jacobson, Morales, and Coulson. R+R. Teaching Food Systems: Content and Pedagogy. Journal of Planning Education and Research. • Professor as consultant. URPL 912 work with Cultivate Kansas City, NYC Street Vendor Project and preliminary work City of Freeport Community economic development, Entrepreneurship, • Covert, Mathew and Alfonso Morales, 2014. “Successful Social Movement Organizing and the Formalization of Food Production.” In The Informal City: Settings, Strategies, Responses edited by Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris and Vinit Mukhija, Cambridge, MIT Press. • Davis, John and Alfonso Morales. 2012. Fining the Hand that Feeds You: Street Vendor Fines and Increasing Revenues to New York City. University of Wisconsin – Urban and Regional Planning, Working Paper 2012-1.
    • 5. P as R -- Migrant workers…key to agricultural productivity, yet exploited sector of workforce
    • 6. Poorest health outcomes of any occupational category, disconnected from social support, problematic access
    • 7. Mobilization and Interventions • Partnered with Promotora Program, 15 previously unrelated migrant households created Club Nuevos Amigos • Produced a variety of health-related benefits • Increased access • Improved mental health and • Enhanced self-efficacy
    • 8. P as T -- URPL 711 Regional Food Distribution: Challenges & Opportunities Aggregation • Sourcing from small-mid size farms requires new aggregation strategies to: • Supply high-volume regional markets • Diversify product lines Transportation & logistics • Inefficiencies associated with the “first and last mile” • Transaction cost of product changing hands multiple times • Variability of load size due to seasonality, production volume • Strategic location decisions for food hubs and distribution centers Transparency across the food supply chain • Food safety • Marketing value • Consumers want to know where there food comes from • Source-identified foods can capture premiums for farmers
    • 9. Solutions Aggregation  Food hubs  Food Innovation Districts Transportation & Logistics  Physical infrastructure • Research to identify hauling needs, capacity & economics • Research to inform location decisions for food hubs & DCs  Building relationships • Develop regional marketing organization • Engage regional planning and intergovernmental organizations Transparency across the supply chain  New approaches to supply chain governance  Technologies (e.g. RFID, QR Codes)  Telling the story of product – “food with a face”
    • 10. Networking Across the Supply Chain February 20-21, 2013 La Crosse, Wisconsin Transportation Services Division Agricultural Marketing Service U.S. Department of Agriculture This Project is supported by Cooperative Agreement No. 12-25- A-5639 between the Agricultural Marketing Service/USDA and the Center for Integrated Agriculture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    • 11. P as T – II Community and Regional Food Systems – Teaching Service Learning
    • 12. Jerry Kaufman – Mentor, Partner, Teacher
    • 13. P as Consultant – applications generating opportunities – for research and service • Grant reviewer for USDA led to relationship with CKC… • Which led to consulting on new urban agriculture ordinances in KC • Which led to mobilization and counter mobilization • Which led to changes in ordinances • Which led to book chapter • Which led to pilot test new data collection • Which led to NEW USDA proposal • Which will lead to….
    • 14. Reminding us of the tight fit between society and state…
    • 15. …and the idea that state serves society
    • 16. P as C – II…sometimes service extends to state to support society
    • 17. Tickets to Changes…
    • 18. Thank You -- What We Have Learned 1. Desire to partner is only the first step 2. Intersection of desire to serve (capacity, etc), and 3. Compatibility with capacity (research), 4. Understanding of circumstances from perspective of served, 5. Interaction, not action 6. Builds mutually adjusting relationships that identify and achieve goals

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