Insulin pump presentation

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  • Inject 4-5 times per day Mix of long-lasting and quick-acting insulin to mimic pancreatic conditions $200/month without insurance for insulin and syringes
  • Insulin pump presentation

    1. 1. Insulin Pumps: Pump Your Way to Better Health <br />John Gancarz<br />Alex Giannakos<br />Chris Reyes<br />Stephanie Steichen <br />
    2. 2. Diabetes<br />Disease of the pancreas<br />Insulin deficiency<br />Affects glucose levels in blood <br />Three types: <br /><ul><li> Type 1
    3. 3. Type 2
    4. 4. Gestational</li></li></ul><li>1994<br />Adjusted percentage of diabetes sufferers, by state, in 1994 and 2008. <br />2008<br />
    5. 5. Effects of Diabetes <br /><ul><li>Twice the risk for heart disease
    6. 6. Twice the risk of death
    7. 7. High sugar levels in blood
    8. 8. Weight gain
    9. 9. Eye Damage
    10. 10. Nerve Damage
    11. 11. Gum Damage
    12. 12. Kidney Damage </li></li></ul><li>Timeline<br />1st Century – Diabetes first recognized by Aretaeus<br />1788 – Dr. Cawley discovered relationship of pancreas to diabetes<br />1921 – Insulin discovered as being secreted by the pancreas<br />1922 – First patient given insulin as a treatment for diabetes<br />1930s – Insulin from pork and beef used <br />1935 – Difference between Type 1 and Type 2 recognized<br />1952 – long-acting insulin created<br />1961 – single use syringe invented<br />1960s – idea of continuous insulin delivery emerged <br />1964 – Arnold Kadish designed first closed-loop insulin pump devised<br />1974 – Biostator, first computer-controlled closed-loop insulin pump<br />Late 1970s – Mill Hill Infuser - first portable and practical insulin pump <br />1978 – Autosyringe, “Big Blue Brick” - first insulin pump to go to market<br />1983 – Today’s leader in insulin pump technology, Medtronic MiniMed, releases their first pump into the market<br />1990s-2000s – Technologies continue to miniaturize and become more user-friendly, durable and accurate in insulin delivery<br />2006 – Medtronic announces the release of the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time System<br />
    13. 13. Traditional Diabetes <br />Treatments<br />
    14. 14. Multiple Daily <br />Injections<br /><ul><li> 3-5 injections per day
    15. 15. Without insurance ~$150/month
    16. 16. Mix of:
    17. 17. Long-acting insulin
    18. 18. Short-acting insulin </li></li></ul><li>Insulin Pump<br /><ul><li> Continuous flow of insulin
    19. 19. Predictable short-acting insulin
    20. 20. Programmable bolus doses
    21. 21. Typically for Type 1 Diabetes
    22. 22. Better mimics pancreatic function </li></li></ul><li>How do Insulin <br />Pumps Work?<br />Infusion Set – Continuous Insulin Dosing<br />Cannula – plastic needle into skin<br />Plastic Tubing – Insulin Delivery<br />Computer-Aided Dosing (Basal and Bolus)<br />Buttons for Bolus Dosing<br />Unit containing insulin<br />
    23. 23. How do Insulin <br />Pumps Work?<br />
    24. 24. Insulin Pump <br />Evolution<br />1964<br />1964<br />2010<br />1978<br />
    25. 25. Insulin Pump <br />Evolution<br />1970s- <br />early 1980s<br />1980s<br />1990s – 2000s<br />Present<br />
    26. 26. Disadvantages<br /><ul><li> Expensive
    27. 27. $4000-$5000 for pump
    28. 28. $500 for monthly supplies
    29. 29. Versus $150/month for traditional injections
    30. 30. Possible weight gain
    31. 31. Danger of catheter </li></ul> dislodgement <br /><ul><li> Remove pump for </li></ul> bathing, swimming and <br /> physical activity<br /><ul><li> Requires training </li></ul> to use correctly <br />
    32. 32. Advantages<br /><ul><li>No individual injections
    33. 33. Easier diabetes management
    34. 34. More flexibility about when/what you eat
    35. 35. Allows for physical activity without large carb</li></ul> consumption <br /><ul><li> Fewer swings in blood </li></ul> glucose level <br /><ul><li> Eliminates unpredictable </li></ul> effects of intermediate <br /> and long-acting insulin <br />
    36. 36. Benefits of <br />Insulin Pumps<br />
    37. 37. Conceptual Framework<br /><ul><li> Relative Advantage
    38. 38. Complexity
    39. 39. Optional Innovation Decision
    40. 40. Observability
    41. 41. How-to knowledge</li></li></ul><li>Finding Sources<br /><ul><li>In general, easy to find
    42. 42. Sources included:
    43. 43. Manufacturer’s websites
    44. 44. Medtronic
    45. 45. Government institutions
    46. 46. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    47. 47. Food and Drug Administration
    48. 48. Independent organizations
    49. 49. American Diabetes Association
    50. 50. Diabetes Health
    51. 51. Scientific/Medical Journals</li></li></ul><li>Credibility and Bias<br /><ul><li> Manufacturer’s Websites
    52. 52. Government Institutions
    53. 53. Independent Organizations
    54. 54. Scientific/Medical Journals</li></li></ul><li>Future Research<br /><ul><li> Quantitative and Qualitative Research
    55. 55. Theoretical Framework
    56. 56. Comparative Study
    57. 57. Potential Problems </li></li></ul><li>Discussion Questions<br />If insulin pumps are covered in large part by insurance (eliminating much resistance due to cost) why are only a quarter of type 1 diabetic patients using insulin pumps if they improve quality of life? <br />How might insulin pumps improve over the following years as technology and research continues to expand our understanding of diabetic issues? <br />What are the political and/or moral implications (if any) that may be associated with the diffusion and ultimate acceptance of the insulin pump?<br />Will the insulin pump dominate the market as a form in treatment for diabetes type 1 in the next 5-10 years?<br />If you were a type 1 diabetic, would you adopt the insulin pump based on the advantages and disadvantages?<br />

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