Nuevo escenario para la salud

1,126
-1

Published on

Exposición respecto de los cambios de paradigma en el sistema de salud.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,126
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Nuevo escenario para la salud

  1. 1. Nuevo Escenario para la Salud DR. CARLOS JAVIER REGAZZONI
  2. 2. La teoría de los paradigmas Nivel  de  problemá2ca  social   Paradigma  I   Paradigma  II   t Problema  en   Acción  del   Agotamiento   plenitud   paradigma   del  paradigma    Joel Barker. “Paradigmas”: Conjunto de ideas que determinan una forma efectiva de resolver problemas.
  3. 3. Problemática en Ascenso•  Nueva Problemática: – Longevidad saludable – Enfermedades complejas y crónicas – Costos y Financiamiento – Inequidad•  Falta de Paradigma Adecuado
  4. 4. 1 LONGEVIDAD Nuevos Escenarios para la Salud
  5. 5. Longevidad y Salud•  AUMENTO DE LA ESPERANZA DE VIDA o  C o n c e n t r a c i ó n d e l a s defunciones en torno a la senilidad
  6. 6. Esperanza de vida al nacer Australia  Esperanza  de  vida  al  nacer,  OECD,  ambos  sexos   Austria   90   Belgium   80   Czech  Republic   France   70   Germany   Hungary   60   Japan   50   Mexico  años   Netherlands   40   New  Zealand   Norway   30   Poland   20   Portugal   Slovak  Republic   10   Sweden   Switzerland   00   Turkey   United  States  
  7. 7. y World life expectancy more than dou- “hypothetical table promised an ultimate Downloaded from www.sciencemag.org on e bled over the past two centuries, from figure of 64.75 years” for the expectationx- roughly 25 years to about 65 for men and of life both for males and for females. At Duración de la Vida e 70 for women (4). This transformation of the time, U.S. life expectancy was about e the duration of life greatly enhanced the 57 years. Because Dublin did not have da-v- quantity and quality of people’s lives. It ta for New Zealand, he did not realize that y fueled enormous increases in economic his ceiling had been pierced by women ), p n 95 Australia UN La expectativa de vida podría estar 90 Iceland World Bank g Japan Olshansky et al. n The Netherlands UN Fries, Olshansky et al. 85 lejos de su límiter- New Zealand non-Maori Coale Coale & Guo Norwayn- Sweden World Bank, UN Bourgeois-Pichat, UN e 80 Siegel Switzerland Life expectancy in years •  La esperanza de vida Bourgeois-Pichat h UN, Frejka s 75e. aumenta:i- 70 Dublin Dublin & Lotkae, –  linealmente, 3 meses/añoar 65 Dublin desde hace 160 años. -r- 60 •  Nadie demostró que la dut 55 edad de fallecimiento no ge- 50 aumente. s 45 1840 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 2020 2040 Jim Oeppen and James W. Vaupel. Brokens- Year Limits to Life Expectancy. Science e 2002;296:1029 d Fig. 1. Record female life expectancy from 1840 to the present [suppl. table 2 (1)]. The linear-re- e gression trend is depicted by a bold black line (slope = 0.243) and the extrapolated trend by a
  8. 8. Compresión de la Mortalidad C  Nº  Defunciones   A   B   Edad   •  Avance  de  la  edad  media  de  mortalidad.   •  Menor  dispersión.  
  9. 9. Mortalidad Humana Probabilidad  de  Morir   EDAD  Strehler  BL,  Mildvan  AS.  Science  1960;  132:14-­‐21  
  10. 10. Curvas de defunciones Defunciones,  ambos  sexos,  cada  100.000,  año  2009.  Elaboración   propia  en  base  a  WHO  20.000  16.000   Argen2na  12.000   Japón   Angola   8.000   4.000   0  
  11. 11. Curvas de defunciones Defunciones,  ambos  sexos,  c/100.000,  a  parGr  de  los  35  años.   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  WHO  (Japón  2009)   20000  Defunciones  cada  100.000   16000   12000   Argen2na  2009   Japón   8000   4000   0   •  La  Argen2na  2ene  un  exceso  de  muertes  en  jóvenes  
  12. 12. Longevidad y Salud•  LONGEVIDAD PROLONGADA o  D i s m i n u c i ó n d e l a mortalidad a edades avanzadas
  13. 13. Retraso de la mortalidadRE|Vol 464|25 March 2010 95 Sweden 1,800 USA Swedes 100+ Japan •  Postérgase mortalidad 1,600 Japanese 105+ 90 a edades avanzadas. 1,400 Number of females aged 100+ or 105+ 85 •  X5 y X10 1,200 X5 –  Edad a 1,000que quedan la Age (yr) 80 5 y 10 años de vida 800 75 promedio. 600 70 X10 •  Argentina 2000: 400 –  X5=89 años 200 –  X10=79 años 65 0 1861 1875 1900 1925 195 1861 1900 1950 2000 Year Year1 | The postponement of mortality. Historical trends in X5 and Vaupel JW. Biodemography Figure 2 | The emergence of the extremely old. T of human ageing. Nature 2010;464:536-542
  14. 14. two strains of S. cerevisiae were used to yeast, death rates may estimate mortality trajectories (Fig.0.01 Be- 0.1 3F). again. 0.05 cause the yeast were kept under conditions The trajectories in Downloaded from www.sciencemag.org on August 11, 201110 120 Probabilidad de Morir 0.00 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Age (days) thought to preclude reproduction, death rates were calculated from changes in the size0of 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0.001 they 0.0 the surviving cohort. Although Age (days) 0 For instance, human ages rises to heights t gevity outliers found i 30 Age (days) 60 death Nematodes Yeast Humans Automobiles Medfliess from 1.5 1.0 1.0 0.20males. 1.0 E FA G B gation Probabilidad  rate Morir  nd 13 1.0 ntries) 0.15period 0.1 1.0 de  s 80 to Death rate s 110 0.1 Death 0.10 serva-2, but 0.01 0.5 0.01 ighestmortal- 0.05hough assive 0.1erson- 0.001 0.0 0.01 0.001 0.00 were 0 10 20 30 40 0 80 30 60 90 110 120e who Age (days) EDAD   90 100 Age (days) Age (years) 120 0 0 2 204 406 60 80 100 120 140 8 10 12 14 Age (years) Age (days) expo- Fig. 3. Age trajectories of death Nematodes at best fits the data at ages 80 to 84 is shown in Death rates were Death rates from of a locally weighted procedure with a 1. rates (48). (A) smoothed by use •  La probabilidad de morir desacelera luego deat best fits the entire data set is shown in blue (16). window of 8122 for human Death rates, determined from survival data from age 80 to days (52). (E) females. 1.0 Ehe logarithm of death rate as a quadratic function populationline is for an for genetically homogeneous lines of nematode The red samples, aggregationat ages 105 and higher; it is shown in green. (B) worms, Caenorhabditis elegans, raised under experimental conditions los 80 años. of 14 countries (Japan and 13 1,203,646 medflies, Ceratitis capitata (17 ). The similar to (53) but with density controlled (21). Age trajectories for the Western European countries) the blue curve for males. The prominent shoulder wild-type worm are shown as a solid red line (on a logarithmic scale given with reliable data, over the period 0.1 1. n arrow, is associated with the death of protein- to fromleft) and 1990 dashed red to (on an arithmetic scale given to the the 1950 to as a for ages 80 line h rate Vaupel  JW,  et  al.  Science  1998;280:855-­‐860   g to produce eggs (51). Until day 30, daily death right); the experimentfor ages 110 550,000 worms. Trajectories for the 109 and to 1997 included about
  15. 15. P robab i l i d a d de m orir, de s a c e l e ra Probabilidad  anual  de  morir  por  rango  etario.  ArgenGna,   hombres,  2009,  2000,  y  1990   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  WHO   1   0,9   0,8   2009   0,7   0,6   2000   0,5   1990   0,4   0,3   0,2   0,1   0  
  16. 16. Expectativa a los 65ExpectaGva  de  vida  a  los  65-­‐69  años  de  edad,  ambos  sexos,  variación  porcentual,  tres  períodos  Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  WHO   122   120   Argen2na   118   116   Variación  porcentual   Brasil   114   Canadá   112   110   Japón   108   106   104   102   100   1990   2000   2009  
  17. 17. Centenarios Canadá   102   Canadá   103   Canadá   103   Japón   104   Japón   105   Japón   106   =Año  de  nacimiento  de  la  cohorte   •  Cohortes y edad a la cual el 50% estará vivoChristensen  K.  Ageing  popula2ons:  the  challenges  ahead  Lancet  2009;  374:  1196–1208  
  18. 18. Longevidad y Salud•  ESPERANZA DE VIDA FINAL o  L a e s p e r a n z a d e v i d a aumenta por mayor longevidad
  19. 19. Esperanza de vida y Senectud ParGcipación  de  los  grupos  etarios  en  el  incremento  de  la   esperanza  de  vida  máxima  para  mujeres,  1850-­‐2007   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  Christensen  K  et  al,  Lancet  2009;374:1196-­‐1208   100%  ParGcipación  en  la  ganancia  total  de   90%   >80  años   80%   esperanza  de  vida   70%   60%   65  a  79   50  a  64   50%   15  a  49   40%   30%   0  a  14  años   20%   10%   0%   1850-­‐1900   1900-­‐25   1925-­‐50   1950-­‐75   1975-­‐90   1990-­‐2007  
  20. 20. Longevidad y Salud•  ENVEJECIMIENTO o  L o n g e v i d a d y m e n o r fecundidad llevan al envejecimiento poblacional
  21. 21. Edad Media, Evolución Edad  Media   Popula2on  Division  of  the  Department  of  Economic  and  Social  Affairs  of  the   United  Na2ons  Secretariat,  World  Popula2on  Prospects:  The  2008  Revision,   hlp://esa.un.org/unpp  50,00  45,00  40,00  35,00   Argen2na  30,00   Bolivia  25,00    Brazil  20,00   Chile  15,00   Colombia  10,00   South  America   5,00   Europe   0,00  
  22. 22. Fecundidad en descenso ArgenGna  Tasa  de  Fecundidad  (hijos/mujer)   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  INDEC   8   7  Hijos/vida  férGl  femenina   6   5   4   3   2   1   0   1869   1895   1914   1947   1960   1970   1980   1991   2001  
  23. 23. Población Mayor: Argentina55.000.000  50.000.000  45.000.000  40.000.000  35.000.000   Población  total  30.000.000  25.000.000   Población  65  años  y  20.000.000   más  15.000.000  10.000.000   5.000.000   15,6%   19%   10,5%   11,9%   13,6%   0   2010   2020   2030   2040   2050   Años  
  24. 24. Longevidad y Salud•  POSTERGACIÓN DE LA DISCAPACIDAD o  Compresión de la morbilidad
  25. 25. Compresión de la MorbilidadEnfermedad postergable Longevidad postergable 100   Sobrevivientes   80  Postergada   Sano   (%)   60   A   B   40   Precoz   Enf.   20   Edad   0                                          A                                  B       Fries JF. Aging, natural death, and the compression of morbidity. N Engl J Med 1980; 303:130-135
  26. 26. Envejecimiento, Riesgo, y Discapacidad •  1.741  alumni  Univ   Reevaluados     •  Edad  ≈43  años   •  77%  varones   Nivel  inicial  de  discapacidad   •  Discapacidad  Anual   Health  Assesment  Ques.onaire   •  Muerte   Nivel  inicial  de  Riesgo   •  BMI   •  Tabaquismo   •  Ejercicio     1962   1986   1994  Vita  AJ,  Terry  RB,  Hubert  HB,  Fries  JF.  Aging,  health  risks,  and  cumula2ve  disability.  N  Engl  J  Med  1998;   338:1035-­‐1041  
  27. 27. 0.30 Disabilidad Acumulada 0.25 High risk Disability Index 0.20 0.15 Moderate risk 0.10 Low risk 0.05 0.00 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 Age (yr)Figure 2. Disability Index According to Age at the Time of the Last Survey and Health Risk in 1986.Average disability increased with age in all three risk groups, but the progression to a given level ofdisability was postponed by approximately seven years in the low-risk group as compared with thehigh-risk group. The horizontal line indicates a disability index of 0.1, which corresponds to minimaldisability. Vita  AJ,  Terry  RB,  Hubert  HB,  Fries  JF.  Aging,  health  risks,  and  cumula2ve  disability.  N   engl  J  med  1998;  338:1035-­‐1041  
  28. 28. Envejecimiento, Riesgo, y Discapacidad•  Hay predictores de discapacidad (riesgo) –  Tabaquismo –  Sedentarismo –  BMI•  A menor riesgo, la discapacidad se post- pone•  A mayor discapacidad, peor progresión Vita  AJ,  Terry  RB,  Hubert  HB,  Fries  JF.  Aging,  health  risks,  and  cumula2ve  disability.  N  engl  J  med   1998;  338:1035-­‐1041  
  29. 29. Evolución del paciente mayor Probabilidad  de  cambio  de  estado  en  pac.  Mayores   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  Lubitz  J  et  al,  2003   90  Probabilidad  (%)    de  cambiar  de  estado   80   70   60   el  año  siguiente   50   Sano   40   Ins2tucionalizado   30   Fallecido   20   10   0   Sano  75   Ins2tución   Sano  85   Ins2tución   75   85   Lubitz  J,  Cai  L,  Kramarow  E,  Lentzner  H.  Health,  life  expectancy,  and  health  care  spending   in  the  elderly.  N  Engl  J  Med  2003;  349:1048-­‐55  
  30. 30. Llegar a los 100 Enfermedad  42%   Sobrevivientes   <80   Enfermedad  45%   Retrasados   >80   No  13%   Escapados   Enfermedad   –  No todos los centenarios contraen una enfermedad crónica asociada a la edad en el mismo momento de su vida.Terry, D.F. et al. Cardiovascular advantages among the offspring of centenarians. J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 2003; 58, M425–M431
  31. 31. Longevidad y Salud•  MEDICINA Y BIENESTAR o  L a l o n g e v i d a d s a l u d a b l e depende de la medicina y el bienestar general
  32. 32. Medicamentos y Longevidad Efecto de los medicamentos sobre la longevidad 2,4 Longevidad ganada con medicación Resto de longevidad ganadaAños de vida ganados 1,8 0,79 0,70 1,2 0,62 0,56 0,6 0,45 0,30 0,12 0,0 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000
  33. 33. Salud y Economía: Argentina Variación  porcentual  de  PBI  y  Mortalidad  InfanGl,  1993=base  100   Elaboración  propia  sobre  datos  de  INDEC   180  Variación  porcentual  respecto  de  1993   160   140   120   100   80   60   40   PBI   20   Mortalidad  Infan2l   0  
  34. 34. Longevidad y Salud•  CONCLUSIÓN o  Más bienestar y más medicina
  35. 35. 2 COMPLEJIDAD Nuevos Escenarios para la Salud
  36. 36. Cambio de PatologíaCausas de Muerte por grupos! Traumaticas"América Latina, WHO! 10000" 9000"Muertes en .000s/año! 8000" Enfermedades no comunicables" 7000" 6000" 5000" 4000" Enfermedades 3000" comunicables, 2000" condiciones 1000" maternas y neonatales y 0" nutricionales" 2008" 2015" 2030"
  37. 37. Causas de Mortalidad, 2030Figure 5. Projections of Global Deaths (Millions) for Selected Causes, for Three Scenarios: Baseline, Optimdoi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0030442.g005of demographic change are labelled ‘‘population growth’’ and highest and where HIV/A‘‘population ageing’’ in Figure 7. The total projected change remain largely constant
  38. 38. Factores de Riesgo en la Arg e n ti a Prevalencia  (%)    de  Detección  de  HTA,  DLP,  DBT   "Programa  de  Vigilancia  de  la  Salud  y  Control  de  Enfermedades"  VIGI+A  e  INDEC,  45,0   Encuesta  Nacional  de    Factores  de  Riesgo  2005.  40,0   Hipertensión  arterial   Hipercolesterolemia   Diabetes  35,0  30,0  25,0  20,0  15,0  10,0   5,0   0,0  
  39. 39. Tabaquismo Prevalencia  de  Tabaquismo   Elaboración  propia  según:    VIGI+A  e  INDEC,  ENFR  2005   Formosa   Santa  Fe   Misiones   Jujuy  Ciudad  de  Buenos  Aires   Chaco   Entre  Ríos   San2ago  del  Estero   Corrientes   Buenos  Aires   Total  del  país   Córdoba   Mendoza   San  Juan   Salta   Río  Negro   La  Rioja   Tucumán   Catamarca   San  Luís   Neuquén   Chubut   La  Pampa   Tierra  del  Fuego   Santa  Cruz   0   10   20   30   40   50   (%)  Mayores  de  18  años  que    fuman  actualmente  
  40. 40. 3 COSTOS Nuevos Escenarios para la Salud
  41. 41. Costo y Salud•  AUMENTO INCESANTE o  El gasto en salud tiende a aumentar
  42. 42. Gasto y Eficiencia Gasto  en  Salud  y  Mortalidad<5  años;  100=año  2000   -­‐Gasto  en  salud,  PPP-­‐U$/capita,  total,  y  Mortalidad  en  <5  años-­‐  WHO   170   Hungría  2008   Brasil  2008   Argen2na  2008  Gasto  en  salud/cápita  $-­‐PPP   160   150   140   Chile  2008   130   120   110   Base,  año  2000   100   55   60   65   70   75   80   85   90   95   100   Mortalidad  en  <5  años  
  43. 43. Gasto en saludNO H AY N I N G U N A R A Z Ó N PA R ADEFINIR ARBITRARIAMENTE UNNIVEL DE GASTO EN SALUD.SI E S O B L I G AT O R I O P R E T E N D E RO B T E N E R M AY O R VA L O R P O R D I C H OGASTO. Fuchs  VR.  Health  care  expenditure  reexamined.  Ann  Intern  Med  2005;  143:  76-­‐8  
  44. 44. Gasto en Salud•  Efectos del Aumento del Gasto en Salud –  Sobre las cuentas públicas •  Quita  fondos  a  otras  áreas   –  Sobre la economía real •  Aumenta  los  costos  de  bolsillo  en  un  área  que  altera  la   dinámica  económica   –  No  sigue  leyes  de  mercado   »  Asimetría  de  información   »  Es  imprescindible   »  El  decisor  (médico)  incen2vado  por  un  sector  más  que   otro   –  Afecta  a  trabajador  y  empleador   Orszag PR. How health care can save or sink America. Foreign Affairs 2011; July/August Fuchs VR. Health care expenditure reexamined. Ann Intern Med 2005; 143: 76-8
  45. 45. Costo y Salud•  HAY SUBTRATAMIENTO o  E l s u b t r a t a m i e n t o s e a s o c i a a un costo de oportunidad desaprovechado
  46. 46. Calidad de Atención en Adultos The Health Insurance Experiment A Classic RAND Study Speaks to the Current Health Care Reform Debateondiciones   30  C seleccionadas  agudas   PARA CADA CONDICIÓN: A RAND RESEARCH AREAS fter decades of evolution and crónicas   y   •  6.712  personas   Key findings: •  Medición de tratamiento THE ARTS CHILD POLICY experiment, the U.S. health care •  Adultos   CIVIL JUSTICE EDUCATION system has yet to solve a funda- recibido • In a large-scale, multiyear experiment, mental challenge: delivering quality •  439  ordable •  Comparación con tratamiento 12  ciudades  USA   Americans at an affindicadores  de  care used fewer health services ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT participants who paid for a share of their HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE health care to all health •  Contacto  explored and older ideas revisited. One de  atención  comparison group given free care. tel.   calidad   price. In the coming years, new solutions will recomendado INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS NATIONAL SECURITY than a be Acceso  a   that has returned to prominence is cost POPULATION AND AGING •  PUBLIC SAFETY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY idea • Cost sharing reduced the use of both Historias  clínicas  care expense and responsibil- SUBSTANCE ABUSE TERRORISM AND sharing, which involves shifting a greater share of health highly effective and less effective services in roughly equal proportions. Cost sharing HOMELAND SECURITY ity onto consumers. Recent public discussion did not significantly affect the quality of TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTUREWORKFORCE AND WORKPLACE Tratamientos  y   of cost sharing has often cited a landmark care received by participants. medidas  preven2vas   RAND study: the Health Insurance Experi- 1998   • Cost sharing in general had no adverse 2000   ment (HIE). Although it was completed over effects on participant health, but there two decades ago, in 1982, the HIE remains were exceptions: free care led to improve- the only long-term, experimental study of cost ments in hypertension, dental health, sharing and its effect on service use, quality of vision, and selected serious symptoms. These care, and health. e purpose of this research McGlynn  EA,  Asch  SM,  Adams  main eesey  J,  Hicks  Jsickest andwere concentratedKerr  EA.  The  Quality  of  Health   brief is to summarize the HIE’s J,  K findings improvements the ,  DeCristofaro  A,   among poorest patients. Care  Delivered  to  Adults  for today’sUnited  States.  N  Engl  J  Med  2003;348:2635-­‐45.   and clarify its relevance in  the   debate. Our goal is not to conclude that cost sharing is
  47. 47. Calidad de Atención Proporción  del  tratamiento  teóricamente  recomendado,   efecGvamente  recibido  por  los  pacientes.  EE.UU.,  12  áreas   metropolitanas,  2003   The Healthpropia  s/RAND,  The  First  Na2onal  Report  Card  on  Quality  of  Health  Care  in  America   Elab   Insurance Experiment 100%   A Classic RAND Study Speaks to the Current Health Care Reform Debate 90%   A RAND RESEARCH AREAS fter decades of evolution and 80%   45,1   45,1   Key findings: 43,9   46,5   THE ARTS CHILD POLICY experiment, the U.S. health care system has yet to solve a funda- 70%   CIVIL JUSTICE EDUCATION • In a large-scale, multiyear experiment, ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT mental challenge: delivering quality participants who paid for a share of their health care to all Americans at an affordable 60%   HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS price. In the coming years, new solutions will health care used fewer health services NATIONAL SECURITY than a comparison group given free care. be explored and older ideas revisited. One 50%   POPULATION AND AGING idea that has returned to prominence is cost No  recibido   PUBLIC SAFETY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY • Cost sharing reduced the use of both sharing, which involves shifting a greater 40%   SUBSTANCE ABUSE TERRORISM AND share of health care expense and responsibil- highly effective and less effective services in roughly equal proportions. Cost sharing HOMELAND SECURITY 30%   TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTUREWORKFORCE AND WORKPLACE Recibido   ity onto consumers. Recent public discussion of cost sharing has often cited a landmark did not significantly affect the quality of care received by participants. RAND study: the Health Insurance Experi- 20%   ment (HIE). Although it was completed over • Cost sharing in general had no adverse effects on participant health, but there two decades ago, in 1982, the HIE remains 10%   the only long-term, experimental study of cost were exceptions: free care led to improve- ments in hypertension, dental health, sharing and its effect on service use, quality of 0%   care, and health. e purpose of this research vision, and selected serious symptoms. These improvements were concentrated among General   Prevención   brief is to summarize the HIE’s main findings Agudo   the sickest and poorest patients. Crónico   and clarify its relevance for today’s debate. Tipo  de  tratamiento     Our goal is not to conclude that cost sharing is good or bad but to illuminate its effects so that
  48. 48. Calidad de Atención Proporción  del  tratamiento  teóricamente  recomendado,   efecGvamente  recibido  por  los  pacientes.  EE.UU.,  12  áreas   metropolitanas,  2003   The Healthpropia  s/RAND,  The  First  Na2onal  Report  Card  on  Quality  of  Health  Care  in  America   Elab   Insurance Experiment 100%   A Classic RAND Study Speaks to the Current Health Care Reform Debate 90%   A 80%   35   41   42   42   fter decades of evolution and 45   RAND RESEARCH AREAS THE ARTS experiment, the U.S. health care Key findings: 50   55   55   70%   CHILD POLICY CIVIL JUSTICE system has yet to solve a funda- 60   • In a large-scale, multiyear experiment, 60%   EDUCATION ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT mental challenge: delivering quality participants who paid for a share of their HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE health care to all Americans at an affordable health care used fewer health services 90   50%   INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS NATIONAL SECURITY price. In the coming years, new solutions will than a comparison group given free care. be explored and older ideas revisited. One 40%   POPULATION AND AGING PUBLIC SAFETY idea that has returned to prominence is cost • Cost sharing reduced the use of both SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 30%   SUBSTANCE ABUSE No  recivido   sharing, which involves shifting a greater highly effective and less effective services TERRORISM AND share of health care expense and responsibil- in roughly equal proportions. Cost sharing 20%   Recivido   HOMELAND SECURITY TRANSPORTATION AND ity onto consumers. Recent public discussion did not significantly affect the quality of INFRASTRUCTURE of cost sharing has often cited a landmark care received by participants. 10%  WORKFORCE AND WORKPLACE RAND study: the Health Insurance Experi- ment (HIE). Although it was completed over • Cost sharing in general had no adverse 0%   two decades ago, in 1982, the HIE remains effects on participant health, but there were exceptions: free care led to improve- the only long-term, experimental study of cost ments in hypertension, dental health, sharing and its effect on service use, quality of vision, and selected serious symptoms. These care, and health. e purpose of this research improvements were concentrated among brief is to summarize the HIE’s main findings the sickest and poorest patients. and clarify its relevance for today’s debate. Our goal is not to conclude that cost sharing is good or bad but to illuminate its effects so that
  49. 49. Mamografía Mamograha  en  los  úlGmos  dos  años  según  provincia.     Localidades  de  5.000  y  más  habitantes.  Total  del  país.  Noviembre  de  2009.  Se  toma   como  población  de  referencia  a  mujeres  de  40  años  y  más  que  se  realizaron  por  lo   menos  una  mamograxa  en  los  úl2mos  2  añ  100%   90%   80%   70%   60%   50%   40%   30%   Mamograxa  No   20%   Mamograxa  Sí   10%   0%  
  50. 50. Oportunidad de Tratar HTA   No:  75,4%   Si:  24,6%   Tratamiento   Si:  38,5%   No:  61,5%  
  51. 51. Costo y Salud•  DETERMINANTES o  E l g a s t o e n s a l u d c a m b i a con la demografía
  52. 52. Contribución relativa de diferentes servicios de salud al crecimiento total del gasto, USA 1996-2017 Otros   17.8%   Hospitales   Other  Personal   28.6%   Health  Care   12.1%   Home  Health   Médicos   Care   21.0%   1.8%   Medicamentos   Nursing  Home   14.3%   Care   4.4%  Notes:  Percentages  may  not  total  100%  due  to  rounding.  Other  Personal  Health  Care  includes,  for  example,  dental  and  other  professional  health  services,  durable  medical  equipment,  etc.  Other  Health  Spending  includes,  for  example,  administra2on  and  net  cost  of  private  health  insurance,  public  health  ac2vity,  research,  and  structures  and  equipment,  etc.    Source:  Kaiser  Family  Founda2on  calcula2ons  using  NHE  data  from  Centers  for  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services,  Office  of  the  Actuary,  Na2onal  Health  Sta2s2cs  Group,  at  hlp://www.cms.hhs.gov/Na2onalHealthExpendData/  (see  Historical;  Na2onal  Health  Expenditures  by  type  of  service  and  source  of  funds,  CY  1960-­‐2006;  file  nhe2006.zip).  
  53. 53. Causas de Gasto Total Gasto  Total,  10  primeras  causas,  Adultos,  US  2008   Center  for  Financing,  Access,  and  Cost  Trends,  AHRQ,  Household  Component  of   50   the  Medical  Expenditure  Panel  Survey,  2008  109 U$S 40   Mujeres   Hombres   30   20   10   0  
  54. 54. GASTO R E L AT I V O E N S A L U D Y E D A D Gasto relativo per cápita en salud, por grupo etario, EE.UU 1999 Edad 35-44 años=1Gasto relativo Meara E, White C, Cutler DM, 20036  5  4  3  2  1  0   0-­‐5   6-­‐14   15-­‐24   25-­‐34   35-­‐44   45-­‐54   55-­‐64   65-­‐74   75+  
  55. 55. Causas de la demanda Modificación  de  la  acGvidad  anual,  según  drivers   demográfico  y  otros   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a  Dash  P,  Llewellyn  C,  Richardson  B.  Developing  a   regional  health  system  strategy.  McKinsey  Quarterly  2011               6   OtrosVariación  anual  (%)   5   Demografía 4   3   2   1   0  
  56. 56. Causas de Gasto, >65 años Gasto  Total,  Primeras  causas,  Mayores,  US  2008   Center  for  Financing,  Access,  and  Cost  Trends,  AHRQ,  Household  Component  109 U$S of  the  Medical  Expenditure  Panel  Survey,  2008   50   40   30   20   10   0   Enf.  Cardíaca   Cáncer   Osteoartri2s   Hipertensión     Trauma  Asoc  
  57. 57. Gasto en Medicamentos Drogas  más  prescriptas,  Ambulatorio,  Adultos,  US  2008   Center  for  Financing,  Access,  and  Cost  Trends,  AHRQ,  Household  and  Pharmacy   Components  of  the  Medical  Expenditure  Panel  Survey,  2008  (%)  del  total  prescripto  ambulatorio   25 Gasto     Ambulatorio   22,5   20 Top  5   15 33%   15,1   10 12,3   8,7   8,4   5 0 DBT y DLP Analgésicos, Cardiovascular Gastrointestinal Psicotrópicos Anticonvulsivos, Antiparkinson
  58. 58. Drogas más vendidas Clases  terapéuGcas  de  mayor  facturación,  mundo,    proyección  2015   Elaboración  propia  en  base  a:  IMS.  The  Global  Use  of  Medicines:  Outlook   Through  2015.  Report  by  the  IMS  Ins2tute  for  Healthcare  Informa2cs   Glaucoma Antivirales Alzheimer Proporción del mercado Eritropoyesis global, 2015=U$S1012! ADHD Analgésicos OsteoporosisEsclerosis Múltiple Anti-epilépticos Antidepresivos Anti-ulcerosos Antiagregantes 41%   Antipsicóticos Anti HIV Resto   Autoinmunes Angiotensina Colesterol Respiratorias Diabetes Oncología 0   20   40   60   80   100   U$S  miles  de  millones  
  59. 59. Top Ten año 2014FARMA   USO   DROGA   LAB   U$S  X109  Avasta2n   Cáncer   Bevacizumab   Roche   8,9  Humira   Artri2s   Adalimumab   Abol   8,5  Enbrel   Artri2s   Etanercept   Pfizer   8  Crestor   Colesterol   Rozuvasta2na   AstraZeneca   7,7  Remicade   Artri2s   Infliximab   Merck   7,6  Rituxan   Cáncer   Rituximab   Roche   7,4  Lantus   Diabetes   Insulina  Glargina   Sanofi-­‐Aven2s   7,1  Advair   Asma/EPOC   Flu2casona-­‐Sameterol   GSK   6,8  Hercep2n   Cáncer   Trastuzumab   Roche   6,4  Novolog   Diabetes   Insulina-­‐Aspartato   Novo  Nordisk   5,7   TOTAL   74,1   Total  Global  Drug  Sales   1.000  (*)   FACTBOX-­‐Worlds  top-­‐selling  drugs  in  2014  vs  2010.  Thomson-­‐Reuters   (*)  Global  drug  sales  to  top  $1  trillion  in  2014:  IMS.  Thomson  Reuters  
  60. 60. Concentración  del  gasto  en  salud,  USA  2005   100%   96,5%   Porcentaje  del  gasto  total  en  salud   80,6%   80%   74,4%   65,5%   60%   50,2%   40%   22,7%   20%   3,5%   0%   Top  1%   Top  5%   Top  10%   Top  15%   Top  20%   Top  50%   Bolom   50%   Porcentaje  de  la  población  rankeada  según  nivel  de  gasto  Note:  Dollar  amounts  in  parentheses  are  the  annual  expenses  per  person  in  each  percen2le.  Popula2on  is  the  civilian  nonins2tu2onalized  popula2on,  including  those  without  any  health  care  spending.  Health  care  spending  is  total  payments  from  all  sources  (including  direct  payments  from  individuals,  private  insurance,  Medicare,  Medicaid,  and  miscellaneous  other  sources)  to  hospitals,  physicians,  other  providers  (including  dental  care),  and  pharmacies;  health  insurance  premiums  are  not  included.    Source:  Kaiser  Family  Founda2on  calcula2ons  using  data  from  U.S.  Department  of  Health  and  Human  Services,  Agency  for  Healthcare  Research  and  Quality,  Medical  Expenditure  Panel  Survey  (MEPS),  2005.  
  61. 61. Concentración del GastoParGcipación  en  el  Gasto  en  Salud,  según  canGdad  de  población.  US,  población,  2005-­‐2006;  MEPS  (Cohen,  Rohde,  2009)   Porcentaje  de  la  población  según  nivel  de  gasto  (percenGlo)   0 Top 1% Top 5% Top 10% Top 25% Top 50% 100 100   Porcentaje  del  Gasto  Total  en  Salud   90   80   81,9 70   95,7 60   59,5 81,9 50   44 59,5 40   44 30   18,7 20   18,7 10   Top 1% Top 5% Top 10% Top 25% Top 50% 0  
  62. 62. Predictores de Riesgo ParGcipación  en  el  Gasto  en  Salud,  según  Edad.    US,  población,  2005-­‐2006;  MEPS  (Cohen,  Rohde,  2009)  Porcentaje  de  población  según  grupo  etario   100%   90%   13,2   80%   26,8   25,3   70%   35,1   60%   45,1   65  y  más   50%   45-­‐64   40%   30-­‐44   36,6   30%   18-­‐29   20%   0-­‐17   10%   0%   Población Top 5% Top 6-10% Top 11-25% General P e r c e n G l o   d e   G a s t o  
  63. 63. Costo y Salud•  GASTO O INVERSIÓN o  El gasto en salud posee réditos sociales
  64. 64. Gasto en Salud y Mortalidad Simulación: gasto en salud y mortalidad infantil Elaboración propia, en base a INDEC y Censo 2001 Mortalidad Infantil (<1año/1.000 nv) 20,5 20 19,5 19 18,5 18 17,5 17 16,5 16 15,5 7 8 9 10 Gasto en Salud (% del PBI)Aumentar el gasto en salud 1% del PBI, baja la mortalidadinfantil 0,6%IMF   Working   Paper.   Fiscal   Affairs   Department.   Social   Spending,   Human   Capital,   and   Growth   in   Developing  Countries:Implica2ons  for  Achieving  the  MDGs.  By  Emanuele  Baldacci,  Benedict  Clements,  Sanjeev  Gupta,  and  Qiang  Cui.  November  2004  
  65. 65. Gasto en Salud y Riqueza ! GDP  PER  CAPITA  Y  GASTO  PER  CAPITA  EN  SALUD,  OECD  2007   8000   EE.UU.  Gasto  en  Salud/año/cápita,  $PPP   7000   6000   5000   4000   Luxemburgo   3000   2000   R²  =  0,56879   1000   OECD  Economic  Data  2009,  OECD   0   0   20000   40000   60000   80000   100000   PBI  per  cápita,  $PPP  
  66. 66. Costo y Salud•  E N LÍNE A CO N DI NÁ MI C A SOC IO-DE MO G RÁF I CA o  E l g a s t o s e c o n c e n t r a e n lo más frecuente: añosos y cardiovascular
  67. 67. Relación crítica Salud   Longevidad   Gasto  Lubitz  J,  Cai  L,  Kramarow  E,  Lentzner  H.  Health,  life  expectancy,  and  health  care  spending   in  the  elderly.  N  Engl  J  Med  2003;  349:1048-­‐55  
  68. 68. H e a l t h , L i f e E x p e c t a n c y, a n d H e a l t h Care Spending among the Elderly Nagi  score   Limitaciones: IADL   •  Nagi +1 1992  –  1998:  3/año:   •  IADL+1 Medicare  Current   ADL   beneficiary  Survey   •  ADL+1 Ins2tucionalizado   •  Instit.+ •  Muerto+ Muerto   N=16.964, Medicare >69 años Lubitz  J,  Cai  L,  Kramarow  E,  Lentzner  H.  Health,  life  expectancy,  and  health  care  spending   in  the  elderly.  N  Engl  J  Med  2003;  349:1048-­‐55  

×