Nesta Final Report Launch 14th December 2009 V7

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Nesta Final Report Launch 14th December 2009 V7

  1. 1. Everyday Innovation: How to enhance innovative working in employees and organisations Prof Fiona Patterson Dr Maura Kerrin Geraldine Gatto-Roissard Phillipa Coan
  2. 2. Introduction • Research aims: – define the characteristics and behaviours associated with innovative working – explore the organisational resources that facilitate or inhibit innovative working – address the ‘how to’ enhance innovative working in employees and organisations • Showing the links between evidence based theory and practice • Context of a global economic crisis
  3. 3. Report overview Part 1. Background & research methodology Part 2. Innovative working & the impact of recession Part 3. Characteristics & behaviours for innovative working Part 4. Organisational factors influencing innovative working Part 5. Managing, leading & promoting innovative working Part 6. How to enhance innovative working in employees & organisations Part 7. Summary & final reflections Appendix • Case Study: How to create an innovation culture • A diagnostic framework for innovative working in organisations
  4. 4. Part 1. Research Methodology • Review of the literature on entrepreneurship, wider business, management and psychology • Senior stakeholder interviews & case examples • UK-wide survey facilitated by the Chartered Management Institute based on 850 responses from member organisations. Thank you to all those who contributed to this research
  5. 5. Literature review key findings http://www.nesta.org.uk/characteristics-and-behaviours-of-innovative-individuals-in-organisations/
  6. 6. Part 2. Innovative Working & the Recession • 78% of survey respondents reported that innovation was now ‘very’ or ‘extremely important’ to their organisation’s agenda • 70% reported that the focus on innovation will be reinforced in the current climate • However, some working practices being adopted will actively inhibit innovative working • Results indicate that the public sector is less focused on promoting innovative working
  7. 7. Common ‘myths’ about innovative working …only a few people are creative …innovators are oddballs …lateral thinking is enough …innovators are not detail conscious …innovators are too challenging to manage …implementation is the easy bit …traditional group-based brainstorming on flip chart/post-its is highly productive …the potential to innovate necessarily decreases with age
  8. 8. Part 3. Characteristics & behaviours for innovative working • Motivation, personal initiative, openness to ideas, self-efficacy, original problem solving are key employee characteristics • Certain characteristics are more important at different phases of the innovation process • Beyond a basic level, intelligence is not linked to innovative working • Conscientiousness is a negative predictor of innovative working • Despite recognising the importance of innovation within selection & recruitment, only 29% of organisations currently act upon this • Current HR practices in many organisations act to inhibit innovative working
  9. 9. Survey results
  10. 10. Part 4. Organisational factors influencing innovative working • Embedding innovation within organisational values is important • Innovative working is enhanced by intrinsic rewards • Only a third of survey respondents reported their appraisal system is directly linked to rewarding innovative working • An organisational culture that supports innovative working is tolerant of failure and values risk taking • These practices were reported as less evident in public sector organisations
  11. 11. Part 4. Organisational factors influencing innovative working “Paper chasing in the public sector undermines judgements and weakens the decision-making process. The controversial case of Baby P is an extreme case in point of what happens when a decision-making process becomes weakened over time. Public servants are often over-concerned about the consequences of failure: negative media coverage can lead to risk aversion, even if the content of the media stories is not related to innovation” (Su Maddock, Director of Innovation, Whitehall Hub).
  12. 12. Part 5. Managing, leading & promoting innovative working • ‘Unclear leadership strategy & goals towards innovation’ is identified as the most significant barrier to innovative working • Respondents from the public sector were significantly more likely to report ‘risk aversion & a fear of failure among leaders’ and ‘too hierarchical a structure across staff levels’
  13. 13. Managing innovative people
  14. 14. Part 6. How to enhance innovative working • Validated psychometric instruments to evaluate employee, team & organisational innovation are available • Leadership & management skills are crucial • Diversity and social networking are key ingredients • Respondents reported ‘cross-functional teams’ (47%) and ‘job rotations/secondments’ (32%) as being commonly available organisational initiatives to promote innovative working • ‘Brainstorming’ was reported as the most common method used to foster idea generation (45% of survey respondents)
  15. 15. Which initiatives work best for idea generation?
  16. 16. Richard Batley, HR Director
  17. 17. Part 7. Summary & Final Reflections
  18. 18. Thank you f.patterson@city.ac.uk m.kerrin@workpsychologygroup.com http://creativity.city.ac.uk MA/MSc in Innovation, Creativity and Leadership, commencing Sept 2010

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