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Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute
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Applied Research for the Creative Industries - Andrew Bud - The Media Institute

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  • 1. The Media Institute Applied Research for the Creative Industries 14th July 2011 Andrew Bud Director© 2010 The Media Institute
  • 2. Overview© 2010 The Media Institute
  • 3. Mission• Contribute to national economic growth and employment….• By increasing the international competitiveness of the huge London and UK media industry…• Addressing the challenges of the digital discontinuity…• Through applied research into technology and social sciences…• Conducted by world-class Universities in London…• Working together in multi-disciplinary teams in a single building…• Supported by Government…• To accelerate innovation and create employment © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.3 p.3
  • 4. Target SectorsWe target our research at three main sectors:• Content Creation – creative flair • TV and film production, including studios and news gathering • Video games • Computer generated graphics and post-production • Music • Advertising• Content Publishing and Presentation – commercial skills • Music Labels, online streaming services, games publishing • Book Publishers • Social media • Distribution platforms – telco and OTT• Distribution Networks – telecommunications innovation • Satellite and cable networks • Broadband and mobile networks © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.4 p.4
  • 5. Leveraging the Digital Discontinuity• The media industry in the UK has the opportunity to use the digital discontinuity to:• Reduce the cost of creating new content - dramatically. • Lower cost results in better risk profiles, easier financing and more scope for the realisation of creative ideas.• Create entirely new types, styles and genres of content. • Video games, CGI and social networking are recent examples of content owing their entire existence to recent technology.• Revolutionise its business model. • Digital disrupts the economics of every facet of the media industry, and its business model is being transformed. Examples are digital cinema, IP video streaming and download, peer-to-peer, mobile applications and e-books © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.5 p.5
  • 6. A New Approach• The digital discontinuity creates opportunities for creative industries worldwide…• …if they are equipped to capture the opportunity• To do so they need to: • Be aware of the potential impact of technology • Explore the changes technology could effect directly and indirectly • Experiment with new ways of creating, delivering and valuing • Derisk opportunities to unlock major investments• They need pre-competitive applied research into technology and economic/legal questions • In general they don’t have it… • …and can’t afford to do it alone © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.6 p.6
  • 7. Areas of Focus• The Institute will succeed by focusing on a number of themes that are crucial to the industry• Research will focus on the following areas: • Creation and capture of content and information • Presentation, user interfaces and multi-channel consumption • Characterisation, discovery and choice of intelligent information • Service delivery and distribution • Rights, privacy and authenticity • Business models, behavioural economics and innovation • Multi-language, multi-culture• Examples of possible research topics for each area are in the appendix. • Industry-led Illustrations of how the Institute’s mission are expressed © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.7 p.7
  • 8. Attraction for Universities and Staff• Exciting, relevant work • Industry-focus is a huge plus• Increases quality of research and hence related government funding• Additional flow of industry funding for research• Access to advanced facilities• Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration is exciting © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.8 p.8
  • 9. Impact and Benefits for Companies• Delivers applied research and advanced development to help companies: • Be aware of the potential impact of technology • Explore the changes technology could effect directly and indirectly • Experiment and prototype new ways of creating, delivering and valuing content • Establish strong defensive IPR positions early • De-risk opportunities to unlock major investments• Key benefits of undertaking work at the Institute will be: • Flexible, easy access to a deep pool of outstanding academic expertise • Low transaction costs in establishing and operating relationship with relevant academic teams - single contract, single relationship, single point of contact • Professionally managed projects and IPR reduce outcome risks • Low day rates reduce project cost • Access to complete, growing pool of IPR, most of it financed by public purse, delivers highly leveraged outcomes • Potential to share risk by participation with other partners © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.9 p.9
  • 10. Management © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.10 p.10
  • 11. Management Strategy• The Institute will be managed to a small number of key metrics to ensure focus: • Industrial revenue and concentration – to manage market relevance without becoming captive to a small number of dominant stakeholders • IPR licensing base – to measure economic impact of industry work • Services utilisation – to ensure that resources are being effectively exploited by industry • Total revenue, P&L, cashflow – to ensure targets for growth and viability are met• The Institute will concentrate on fostering a culture of creative, industry- focused innovation, which takes pride in making business better by being clever. Cross-disciplinary teamwork will be strongly encouraged. © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.11 p.11
  • 12. Research Personnel Model• Academics will continue to be employed by their current university Colleges and will work on secondment to the Institute• Pay and conditions will initially remain unaffected by secondment• Institute HR will draw attention of host Colleges to any notable disparities that emerge• Seconded staff will be subject to the rules and policies of the Institute staff handbook• Research staff may work at the Institute part-time, subject to the consent of Institute management• Clear boundaries must be established between “in-Institute” and “ex-Institute” work, for IPR reasons• Academic publication will be under dual-affiliate titles © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.12 p.12
  • 13. Organisation TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 14. Facilities• The concept of “place” is central to the Institute’s vision • This is not a virtual centre of excellence• “Face-time” between researchers from different institutions and different disciplines and company partners is considered vital to drive real relevant innovation• The prestige of the “place” is crucial to attracting the best research talent, industry commitment and continuing Government support• The Institute will occupy offices and lab space in East London Tech City, within easy reach of the industry clusters in WC/W1 • Currently forecast to use 1250m2 including public areas in 2013• An outstation for facilities including stages, data centre and incubation may be required, in a lower-rent area on the periphery of the centre of London © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.14 p.14
  • 15. Governance TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 16. Membership and Governance• The Institute will be a Charity if possible• Universities are the Members of the Institute • They do not control it• Members must vote 2/3 in favour to: • Change the Objectives of the Institute or its Articles • Raise new membership fees • Close the Institute down• A majority of Members must also approve independent candidates for the Board• The Institute is controlled by: • The Board • Technical Advisory Panel TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 17. The BoardThe Board of the Institute will serve as the Trustees of the charity and is comprised of: • Independent directors (the majority) • 1/3 of the Board, at least two directors, elected by the Members • The Director• Directors serve for three years • Directors serving when Members’ Agreement signed require no further appointment• Independent directors are selected by the Board itself • Intended to be industry figures of known integrity and expertise • Subject to veto by Members TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 18. Technical Advisory Panel• Board takes advice from the Technical Advisory Panel • All members and important industry sponsors can be on the Panel • Chief Scientist chairs the Panel • Panel governance is TBC, and subject to Board approval• Panel oversees • Procedures for allocating research • Evolution of research themes • Assessment of academic standing of proposed new members• Allocation of Research • Must satisfy competition law – no carve-outs for Members • New work subject to calls for bids and submissions from members • Panel will establish criteria for choosing amongst bids TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 19. Intellectual Property TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 20. IP Policy Key Objectives• Creation and use of IP as a cumulative asset to be managed for the benefit of the entire UK industry – a trustee for growing know-how• Avoid compromising existing University background IP• Maximum freedom for Institute academics to pursue research unhindered by IPR barriers• Avoid fragmentation of Institute background to maximise its reuse potential• Avoid unknowing incorporation of restricted IP into Institute output• Availability of Institute IP for licensing, patent pool or defensive publication purposes• Use of IP licensing procedures as a tool for monitoring the economic impact of the Institute• Revenues to the Institute from IP are not an objective TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 21. IP Policies• Institute will own all IP generated within its walls, whether financed by RC or industry money• All IP licensed back to University Members for research purposes• Required University Background automatically licensed to Institute solely for research projects• Universities and academics must declare beforehand the licensing conditions for commercial use of their Background• Companies will receive commercial licenses for the work they finance – some of them may be very powerfully structured• Use of open-source will be rigorously managed• Revenues from RC-funded IP licenses will be shared back to the Universities• IP policies for commercial projects will be agreed for each project TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 22. Licensing and Disclosure• The Institute will license its IP and demand licensing accounts from companies, to monitor the economic impact of its work• Nominal license fees will be market-rate• Nominal fees will be discounted • By 100% for sponsor companies • Where IP can be licensed to other parties, by 99% for other companies, up to 3x the total cumulative research spend of a company in the Institute• For RC-funded work, there is a presumption of publication • Institute must check work pre-publication to prevent wildcat disclosures• For commercially funded work, publication is subject to agreement with the sponsor at the outset TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 23. Business Plan TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 24. Business Model• The Institute will receive funding directly from companies sponsoring research…• …and will remit some to the Universities contributing staff• The Universities will receive funding directly from the Research Councils for work carried on in the Institute and…• The Institute will receive some money from Universities for facilities and support• The Institute seeks to receive direct Government grant via the TSB as a Technology Innovation Centre• The Institute will rent out its facilities, teach training courses and offer consultancy to third parties © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.24 p.24
  • 25. Industrial Sales Model Years FY2011/12 FY2012/13 FY2013/14 Nov-11 Feb-12 May-12 Aug-12 Nov-12 Feb-13 May-13 Aug-13 Nov-13 Feb-14• Industrial income Total industrial income 104,167 166,667 204,167 216,667 231,250 252,083 302,083 339,583 400,000 412,500 Sales 800,000 400,000 300,000 50,000 525,000 350,000 350,000 350,000 825,000 450,000 modelled as a Contracts Contract length 6 3 2 1 4 4 3 3 4 4 stream of multi-year C1 Sold (years) 3 300,000 C2 3 200,000 contracts C3 C4 2 1 100,000 100,000 C5 1 50,000 C6 1 50,000• Revenue is C10 C11 2 1 200,000 100,000 recognised evenly C12 C13 2 2 100,000 200,000 C14 2 100,000 throughout the C15 C16 1 3 50,000 250,000 contract period C17 C18 2 1 200,000 50,000 C19 1 25,000 C20 2 100,000• Launch contracts C21 C22 2 1 100,000 50,000 C23 3 100,000 are provided by C24 C25 2 2 200,000 100,000 initial sponsors C26 C27 1 2 50,000 200,000 C28 2 100,000 C29 1 50,000• Contract sizes are C30 C31 3 2 500,000 250,000 gauged in line with C32 C33 C34 1 1 2 50,000 25,000 200,000 media industry C35 C36 2 2 100,000 100,000 capability to C37 C39 C40 1 3 2 50,000 sponsor C41 C42 2 1 C43 1 C44 3 C45 2 C46 2 C47 1 C48 3 C50 2 © Media Institute 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011 p.25 p.25
  • 26. Financial Projections 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015RC Spend Payments to Members 731,374 1,109,017 1,578,858 2,131,818Institute Income -Maxwell 87,500 1,212,500 1,875,000 2,375,000 2,875,000 -RC from members - 146,275 221,803 315,772 426,364 -Industrial 104,167 818,750 1,293,750 2,037,500 2,735,417 -Facilities 5 167 775 979 979COGS Payments to Universities 67,708 532,188 840,938 1,324,375 1,778,021Institute outgoings -Staff 185,353 680,665 1,129,749 1,512,236 1,954,952 -Rent & facilities 16,905 301,875 377,344 603,750 603,750 -Other opex 30,200 74,700 112,700 141,700 153,700 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 27. Funds Flows (2014) Research Councils £ 1,578,858 Government/TSB Universities Companies £ 315,772 £ 2,375,000 £ 2,037,500 The Media Institute £ 141,700 £ 1,512,236 £ 1,324,375 £ 603,750 Other Universities Facilities Staff TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 28. Current Status• Seed funding from University College London • Supported by Dean of Engineering Professor Anthony Finkelstein • Academic Lead Professor Ingemar Cox • External Director Andrew Bud, technology entrepreneur• Established in form and substance • Incorporated as not-for-profit company in August 2010 • “Media Research Partners Limited” “The Media Institute” • Legal agreements defining the Institute now complete in settled drafts • Own branding and website www.themediainstitute.com • Operating a series of open networking seminars• Offered a detailed EOI to the TSB in February 2011 TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 29. Appendix:Example Research Topics TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 30. Areas of Focus• The Institute will succeed by focusing on a number of themes that are crucial to the industry• Research will focus on the following areas: • Creation and capture of content and information • Presentation, user interfaces and multi-channel consumption • Characterisation, discovery and choice of intelligent information • Service delivery and distribution • Rights, privacy and authenticity • Business models, behavioural economics and innovation • Multi-language, multi-culture• Examples of possible research topics for each area follow. • Industry-led Illustrations of how the Institute’s mission will be expressed TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 31. Examples: Content Creation and CaptureComputer Generated Graphics for Cinema and TV • Low-cost 3D photo-real actor and scene synthesisVirtual world synthesis for video games and social media • real time synthesis of 3D spaceNews Gathering • Compact, portable, low-bandwidth broadcast-quality HDNext Generation Multi-Media • authoring of integrated text, pictures and audio-visualTele-presence of live events (eg. concerts) • capture of complex environments and experiencesVirtual events and museums • creation of complex place-like experiences TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 32. Examples: Presentation, Cross Platform, UIReal-time multi-format encoding • simultaneous stream availability for mobile, tablet, PC, TV, etc.Portable content • containers for moving/sharing content between devices3D gesture-based user interfaces, metaphors & widgets • successful interaction models in a depth-enabled spaceImplications of new displays, sensors and transducers • Novel applications of paper replacement, flexible displays, tactile sensorsMulti-screen presentation • metaphors and narrative models for experiences on several different screens at once and on unconventional screensAccessible interfaces • media access devices for the old and the disabled TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 33. Examples: Characterisation, Discovery, ChoiceInterchange standards for metadata • enabling transfer of rich metadata along the value chainAutomated extraction and generation of metadata • essence extraction from audio and visual content • generation of meta-data on different scales for the same contentDiscovery Journeys • determination of successful trajectories through personalised search experiencesStorefront & Publishing Techniques • metaphors for display and promotion of audio-visual content • presentation of micro-modular content for easy self-packaging • classification and self-identification of very large linked inventory setsAdvertising and Marketing • personalisation and multi-screen presentation of advertising TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 34. Examples: Service DeliveryEnd-to-End Quality of Service management • in variable throughput/congestion networksArchitectures for multi-network delivery • integration of different last-mile tails with selection and handoverTraffic forecasting in media-loaded networks • impact of audio-visual media load growth on cost and performanceFuture impacts of peer-to-peerNetwork enabler services • opportunities for media distributors from enabler APIs TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 35. Examples: Rights, Privacy and AuthenticityTracking consumption of rights-derived content • watermarking, reporting, derivation detectionProtection algorithms for DRM and private dataReducing the cost of managing originator rights • legal and operational means to simplify clearance and adminLegal frameworks for digital rights • ways to make copyright law fit for the digital purposeLicensing models for digital content • models for monetising beyond copyrightProtecting privacy in a personalising world • identification and protection of key privacies when visibility is total • ways to safely share personalisation data with and along the value chain TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 36. Examples: Economics and Business ModelsBehavioural Economics of Digital Content • perceptions of value, responses to costsGame Theory of Digital Distribution • supplier strategies in the game with consumersBusiness Models for Digital Media • acknowledging the new behaviours and dynamics of consumersModels for Dynamic Pricing of Content • adapting value generation to the new model of consumer behaviourValuing Personal Data • models for valuation and value sharing between protagonists TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 37. Examples: Multi-Culture, Multi-Language• Automated subtitling and dubbing• Synthesis of signing and avatar speakers for the deaf• Parameterisation of gesture dialects for international UIs TSB v1.0 14/07/2011
  • 38. The Media Institute A world-class research centre serving a world-class industry www.themediainst.org© 2010 The Media Institute

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