• Like
  • Save
Creating capabilities.duckworth.042410
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Creating capabilities.duckworth.042410

  • 1,240 views
Published

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,240
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Strategia: An approach to cultivating self-control Angela Lee Duckworth Department of Psychology University of Pennsylvania
  • 2. “ One of the most significant contrasts among the factors residing within the individual is that between capacity and industry ” Clark Hull, 1928
  • 3. Effort/ Practice SKILL Latent Talent
  • 4. Skill as a function of deliberate practice Skill Age (years) Figure adapted with permission from “The scientific study of expert levels of performance” by K.A. Ericsson, p. 90, © 1998
  • 5. Skill as a function of deliberate practice Skill Age (years) Figure adapted with permission from “The scientific study of expert levels of performance” by K.A. Ericsson, p. 90, © 1998 Less talented individual?
  • 6. Effort/ Practice SKILL Latent Talent Intrinsic interest Grit Self-efficacy Self-control Goal choice and commitment
  • 7. Deliberate practice ≠ immediate gratification
  • 8. Students “beeped” while doing homework or studying say…it’s not enjoyable or easy … but it’s important to their long-term goals
  • 9. Deliberate Practice SKILL Latent Talent Intrinsic interest Grit Self-efficacy Self-control Ability to regulate behavior after goals have been selected
  • 10. Learnable, teachable strategies facilitate self-control
  • 11. The “marshmallow test”
    • Four-year old preschoolers
    • One marshmallow now vs. two later
    • Wait time in seconds predicts SAT scores more than 10 years later, as well as a range of social-cognitive, personal and other competencies. (explains 18% of variance in verbal SAT and 32% of variance in math SAT scores)
  • 12. Is it really self-control?
  • 13. Is it actually IQ?
  • 14.
  • 15. What NCLB leaves behind
  • 16. Insights from the marshmallow studies
    • Temptations were somewhat idiosyncratic
      • Children can learn to identify the types of temptations that are “hottest” for them
    • Strategic use of distraction
      • Out of sight, out of mind
    • Cognitive transformation
      • Fluffy white clouds are not tempting
  • 17. Cognitively transforming an angry memory… … Replay the event as it unfolds in your imagination through your own eyes. … Replay the event as it unfolds in your imagination as you observe your distant self. VS
  • 18. … reduces negative affect
  • 19. If-then planning
    • Self-control is not helped much by “Try your best!” exhortations
      • Specific goals are more effective (e.g., “Complete your math homework every day.”)
      • When goals are specific, feedback is possible.
    • An if-then plan specifies where, when, and how you will accomplish your goal
      • “ If it is a weekday at 6pm, I will go to my room and open my book bag to do my work.”
      • And, “If my brother bothers me, I will…”
  • 20. From strategies to habits
    • “ Our virtues are habits as much as our vices…our nervous systems have grown to the way in which they have been exercised, just as a sheet of paper or a coat, once creased or folded, tends to fall forever afterward into the same identical folds” --William James (1899)