Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Beyond Piracy: FREE COLLABORATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS AND IDEAS TODAY AND TOMORROW
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Beyond Piracy: FREE COLLABORATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS AND IDEAS TODAY AND TOMORROW

1,480
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,480
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. BEYOND PIRACY:FREE COLLABORATIVE DISTRIBUTIONOF BOOKS AND IDEASTODAY AND TOMORROWcreated by sean cranbury@seancranbury | @booksontheradiopresented atbookcamp halifax 2011sfu summer publishing workshops 2011surrey international writers conferencebookcamp vancouver 2012
  • 2. EVOLUTIONARY STEP OR CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR?  BEYOND PIRACY 
  • 3. SOME DEFINITIONS OF PIRACY •  Crimes commi=ed on the high seas and oceans especially on ships  and boats. – via the internet •  Illegal reproducLon of materials which are patented or protected  by copyright. – via the internet •  “a global scourge,” “an internaLonal plague,” and “nirvana for  criminals”… it is probably be=er described as a global pricing  problem. High prices for media goods, low incomes, and cheap  digital technologies are the main ingredients of global media piracy.  If piracy is ubiquitous in most parts of the world, it is because these  condiLons are ubiquitous.” – via Media Piracy in Emerging Economies Report •  An instantaneous worldwide collaboraLve distribuLon system  driven by parLcipant enthusiasm about content that remains  largely untapped by tradiLonal publishers. – via Books on the Radio. 
  • 4. The future is  already here  its just not very  evenly distributed. ‐ William Gibson 
  • 5. Neal Stephenson’s REAMDE.  Published September 20, 2011.  1056 pages. $38 CDN.  Uploaded to Pirate Bay same day.  EPUB/mobi ediLons bundled.  Currently: 38 seeders.  Approx d/l Lme: 38 seconds. 
  • 6. The internet is a copy machine.   •  The internet is a copy machine. At its most  foundaLonal level, it copies every acLon,  every character, every thought we make  while we ride upon it… The digital  economy is thus run on a river of copies.  Unlike the mass‐produced reproducLons of  the machine age, these copies are not just  cheap, they are free.   •  … copies flow so freely we could think of  the internet as a super‐distribuLon system,  where once a copy is introduced it will  conLnue to flow through the network  forever, much like electricity in a  superconducLve wire.  •  Kevin Kelly, Be=er Than Free. www.kk.org    
  • 7. This is a DistribuLon Network This is a data visualizaLon of the blogosphere circa 2008.  This distribuLon network is based on shared enthusiasm, ideas, community ethics, not commerce (though commerce may result or be facilitated by community interacLons).  ParLcipaLon = influence. 
  • 8. •  P2P file sharing/bit torrent  technologies and whatever  subsequent advances occur that offer  even greater efficiencies for trading  digital informaLon are going to  eviscerate current publishing models  and provide new plalorms for  expression, sharing ideas, mixing and  remixing narraLves across a huge  range of interconnected media and  re‐engineering texts…  Books, released from the tyranny of  their covers, physical dimensions  and coordinated distribuLon  networks will transcend themselves  into a place where pure creaLvity  and collaboraLon can exist without  the burden of commerce.    ‐  Sean Cranbury in conversaLon with  Hugh McGuire. The Future of  Publishing, Open Book Toronto,  September 2009. 
  • 9. How can we interpret these numbers?  This is a “Piracy Study”  conducted by that renown,  imparLal third‐party  organizaLon, The Business  Sooware Alliance in 2007.    What do these numbers tell us?    When we compare what we  know about the poliLcal and/or  economic relaLonships between  the countries on both sides of  this table what do we noLce?   
  • 10. Media Piracy in Emerging Economies is the first independent, large‐scale study of music, film and sooware piracy in emerging economies, with a focus on Brazil, India, Russia, South Africa, Mexico and Bolivia.  Major Findings:    Prices are too high.    CompeLLon is good.    AnLpiracy educaLon has failed.    Changing the law is easy. Changing the  pracLce is hard.    Criminals can’t compete with free.    Enforcement hasn’t worked.    h=p://piracy.ssrc.org 
  • 11. Coda: A Short History of Book Piracy  from the Media Piracy in Emerging Economies Report •   Such monopolies inevitably a=racted  compeLtors from the ranks of the less privileged  printers, as well as from those outside local  markets. Repeatedly, over the next centuries,  state‐protected book cartels were challenged by  entrepreneurs who disregarded state censorship,  crown prinLng privileges, and guild‐enforced  copyrights.   •  New pirate entrants always responded to •  Pirate publishers played two key roles in this  the market inefficiencies created by the  context: they printed censored texts, and they  cartels. In the short run these distorLons  introduced cheap reprints that reached new  could be upheld by state power. But in the  reading publics. Both acLons fueled the  long run, pirate pracLces were almost  development of a deliberaLve public sphere in  always incorporated into the legiLmate  Europe and the transfer of knowledge between  ways of doing business. Over Lme,  more and less privileged social groups and  regulatory frameworks changed to  regions.  accommodate the new publishing  landscape.  
  • 12. “Many of the great ruins that grace the deserts and jungles of the earth are monuments to progress traps, the headstones of civilizaLons which fell vicLm to their own success. In the fates of such socieLes — once mighty, complex, and brilliant — lie the most instrucLve lessons...they  are fallen airliners whose black boxes can tell us what went wrong.”    ‐ Richard Wright, A Short History of Progress. 
  • 13. This presentaLon was created,  formulated and regulated by Sean Cranbury with the help of  the internet.    Sean lives in Vancouver, BC.    He is a writer and former  independent bookseller who now hosts a radio show & blog  called Books on the Radio.    He is the co‐creator of the  Advent Book Blog and the W2 Real Vancouver Writers’ Series.    www.booksontheradio.ca www.realvancouverwriters.org  www.seancranbury.com