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Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
Have you thought about your cultural assets lately
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Have you thought about your cultural assets lately

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Talk about infrastructure!! There are more than 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums in US communities. You’re a social entrepreneur effecting positive community change. Cultural institutions, like …

Talk about infrastructure!! There are more than 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums in US communities. You’re a social entrepreneur effecting positive community change. Cultural institutions, like museums and libraries, are great partners. Whether the issue is workforce development, early learning, climate change, digital inclusion, immigration, childhood obesity, or the global knowledge economy – there are innovative libraries and museums taking up the cause and making a difference. During this session you will hear about current examples and explore connections between community change and the work of libraries: public, school and academic and museums: art, history, sci-tech, children’s, zoos and botanical gardens.

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  • Open for discussion on how museums and libraries have met individual and/or community needs of the session participants.
  • The number of obese children in the U.S. has more than tripled in the past 30 years, and for the first time in history there may be a generation with a shorter lifespan than their parents.Obesity causes an estimated 112,000 deaths each year, and one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. The number of overweight children is growing across the globe, but the United States continues to have more overweight children than other nations. Statistics have also shown that childhood obesity is more prevalent among particular racial and ethnic groups, such as Africans Americans and Hispanics. Economically, implications from obesity can accumulate significant costs to individuals and society. Yearly, an obese person incurs an average of over $1,000 more in medical bills than a person of average weight. In 1998, overall costs for obesity-related medical attention was around $40 billion, but by 2008, $147 billion was being spent annually on these same issues. Obesity has the potential to weaken our country’s defenses. Over one-quarter of Americans between the ages of 17-24 are too heavy to serve in our armed services. Children's Museum of ManhattanYear: 2010Amount:Grant: Museums for AmericaThe Children’s Museum of Manhattan (CMOM)—in partnership with City University of New York’s Early Childhood Professional Development Institute (CUNY PDI)—will fill a critical gap in early childhood education by creating a unified early childhood and health education professional development model. The proposed Play is Learning program will enable home-based childcare providers from low-income households, in New York City, to ensure the healthy development and learning of children in their care, while building the capacity of the museum to serve as a valuable resource for adults working with young children. CMOM will codify the health-focused Play is Learning curriculum and synthesize findings from the project evaluation into a training manual, enabling replication by other organizations in need of professional development programs in early childhood education and health. Children's Museum of Manhattan – New York, NY Year: 2009Amount: $828,143Grant: National Leadership Grants for Museums - DemonstrationThe Children’s Museum of Manhattan will use its grant to increase the capacity of museums to provide community-wide leadership in the fight against childhood obesity by designing, assessing, and disseminating the National Institutes of Health’s We Can! curriculum for children under age eight and their parents. The museum is partnering with the Association of Children’s Museums to undertake this three-year Early Childhood Obesity Prevention project. Research will examine the potential benefits of expanding the We Can! program to include children aged eight and younger.  
  • As of 2008, the U.S. was home to 37,960,935 foreign-born residents (2.5% of the population). Successful assimilation into the community stimulates the growth of a culturally, intellectually, and socially rich society, and galvanizes opportunities for immigrants to contribute to their communities and the economy at greater levels.  Immigration to our nation is, if not at its highest peak, then certainly holding steadily enough that by 2050, 15% of our neighbors will be foreign-born. As of 2007, the foreign-born comprised 12.6% of our total population, with 38,059,694 immigrants, refugees, naturalized citizens, legal permanent residents, and asylees making their new homes in the U.S., a number that continues to rise. By 2016, a significant portion—34.8%—of the U.S. workforce will diminish as baby boomers transition into retirement. In addition, our native-born workforce is expected to essentially stagnate, with the participation rates of the 16 to 24 age group in the labor market to decline by 2016, and the 25 to 54 age group to grow at a rate of only 0.2% in comparison to a 3.9% growth rate of the 55+ age group. To compete in the modern-day global market, the U.S. will have to rely upon its immigrants, as our active and diligent baby boomers reach retirement age. Orange County Library System – Orlando, FL Year: 2008Amount: $120,603  Grant:National Leadership Grants for Libraries - DemonstrationThe Orange County Library System will create a multifaceted learning experience called Citizenship Inspired, which allows users seeking U.S. citizenship to take the required courses, making use of learning and communication methods that best suit their own situation and needs. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in one-on-one learning, learning in groups, live online learning, or self-paced online tutorial learning. Citizenship Inspired seeks to build a community of learners who will work through the series of classes together. The library will use social networking tools to support the continued collaboration of these communities outside of formal learning. The primary outcome is the successful naturalization of participants in its program. This project will provide a model for similar programs in other public libraries across the country.
  • Alaska has the nation's highest rate of illegal drug use, and Haines and its neighboring villages suffer from high unemployment ranging from 14 percent in the general population to 75 percent in tribal villages.Haines Borough Public Library – Haines, AK Year: 2005Amount: $212,367  Grant: Partnership for a Nation of Learners Community Collaboration Grants The Voices Project is a two-year program developed by the Haines Borough Public Library and Lynn Canal Broadcasting (KHNS radio). This multi-faceted project focuses on the innovative application of technology to educate rural Alaskans about the impacts of drug and alcohol abuse. Alaska has the nation's highest rate of illegal drug use, and Haines and its neighboring villages suffer from high unemployment ranging from 14 percent in the general population to 75 percent in tribal villages. The project will promote lifelong learning and social engagement for patrons and listeners in Haines, Klukwan, Skagway, and 20 rural Alaskan towns reached by Community Radio Alaska. Activities include training for community participants in storytelling through digital audio production, creation of audio diaries illustrating the impacts of substance abuse, dissemination of audio diaries through broadcast and through a website, and development of related resources such as curriculum materials for dissemination via the website.
  • Recognizing both the trend in society toward a greater incidence of depression among elders and the need for self-directed methods of alleviating the symptoms of depression, the designers of the study sought to compare the effects of two kinds of "interventions" involving regular garden visits against a third intervention utilizing art therapy. (An intervention is a set of activities intended for the purpose of alleviating depression.) Researchers undertook the study to determine whether or not garden visits were as effective as, or more effective than, art therapy in relieving symptoms of depression in older adults. Art therapy is an intervention that previously has been shown to decrease depression in the elderly by allowing elders to express feelings of sadness and loss. Morikami, Inc. – Delray Beach, FL Year: 2005Amount: $110,283  Grant:National Leadership Grants for Museums - Research and DemonstrationThe Morikami is collaborating with the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University to create a unique program that targets a growing demographic group: seniors over 65 who are dealing with depression. The study will determine whether and how museums can provide programs, such as garden walks and guided imagery walks, designed to improve seniors' mental health and overall well-being. Project findings may enable other museums with gardens or outdoor exhibits to offer walks or adapt existing programs for the same purposes. Study findings will be disseminated through conference presentations and journals, as well as an on-line training manual that will be made available on the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens Web site.
  • Homeless children are by most accounts among the fastest growing segments of the homeless population, accounting for 25 percent of the urban homeless population. Homelessness causes difficult social, emotional and physical barriers for children, sometimes leading to low self-esteem, emotional trauma, lack of self-confidence, depression, unhappiness, lack of personal hygiene, lack of sleep, and hunger. Young At Art Children’s Museum’s ArtREACH program helps to improve the lives of these children by establishing a safe, productive, creative environment that nurtures their artistic, emotional and educational growth. Young at Art of Broward – Davie, FL Year: 2003Amount: $185,902 Grant: National Leadership Grants for Museums - Museums in the CommunityArtREACH is a project by the Young at Art Children's Museum of Broward in collaboration with the School Board of Broward County and two homeless shelters (Plymouth Colony and Broward Outreach Center) operated by the Salvation Army in Broward County to provide museum services to children in need. An after-school arts and homework assistance center will be established in Plymouth Colony, for children in both shelters. This program will provide activities at the shelter to support mothers and their children through play and learning. The program encourages life-long learning in the arts by providing free museum memberships to all families that participate. The goal of the project is to assist in building educational skills, self-esteem and self-confidence, and help children and their families learn together and make the museum part of their family life.
  • In the IMLS Opportunity for All study, 40 percent of the respondents (30 million people) use library internet access for employment or career purposes.Online Computer Library Center/WebJunction - Seattle – Seattle, WA Year: 2010Amount: $940,750  Grant:Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program - Continuing EducationWebJunction and the State Library of North Carolina will conduct needs assessments to outline unemployment impacts in all United States regions and will create a corresponding curriculum that can be tailored to meet local needs. WebJunction will conduct one train-the-trainer workshop and up to 75 local workshops for an estimated 1,875 public library staff working in the highest unemployment areas. It will deliver presentations at local conferences and make a free version available online, in addition to hosting a Web site for ongoing communication among state libraries. OCLC-Webjunction – Seattle, VA Year: 2009Amount: $250,000  Grant:Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program - Continuing EducationIn this one-year project,Webjunction, in partnership with the State Library of North Carolina, will develop a series of regional workshops to train librarians in the provision of information services in communities suffering from the economic downturn. The workshop will emphasize skills needed by job-seekers, including job skills, resume preparation, interviewing skills, job search strategies, and community resources and support services to provide coordinated assistance to individuals and families who have been affected by the recession. The project team will deliver the training to state library agency staffs who will then customize that training for librarians in their home states. Webjunction will also develop and host an online training module that reflects the workshop curriculum and experiences. All materials will be hosted and made available online at no cost to participants.
  • International Coalition of Sites of Conscience – New York, NY Year: 2007Amount: $162,029 Grant: 21st Century Museum ProfessionalsThis project will build the capacity of 12 immigration history museums—including the Japanese American National Museum, Ellis Island National Monument, and the Levine Museum of the New South—to design and facilitate public dialogue programs on immigration issues of concern to their communities. Recognizing the growing role of museums as new centers for civic engagement, the “Immigration Sites of Conscience Network” will assist this pilot group of museums to create concrete and balanced methodologies and practices for using history and dialogue to explore contemporary immigration issues from multiple perspectives. Funding will support professional development for over 30 senior education and program staff in dialogue facilitation, programming, evaluation tools, and training in contemporary immigration issues. The project will create ongoing support through Web conferences and an online resource center.Science Museum of Minnesota – Saint Paul, MN Year: 2005Amount: $150,000  Grant:Museums for AmericaThe Science Museum of Minnesota (SMM) will use its IMLS grant to fund programs associated with the national traveling exhibition “Understanding Race and Human Variation,” currently in development. The lead agency on this project is the American Anthropological Association (AAA). The AAA contracted SMM to share in the planning and assume implementation of the exhibition (i.e., design and fabrication). SMM will also be the premiere venue for the exhibition and is in negotiations with the AAA to manage the national tour. “Understanding Race” is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Ford Foundation. The exhibition will open in fall 2006 for a three- to six-month run at SMM prior to a five-year national tour. The IMLS grant will fund development and presentation of local programs in support of the exhibit (before, during, and after its run in St. Paul) that will maximize the project’s educational impact by linking it directly with the concerns of the Twin Cities’ diverse communities. (The NSF and Ford Foundation grants do not cover such local programs.) SMM considers these ancillary programs critical to fully realizing the exhibition’s educational opportunity and preparing the community to receive it. Programming will include a weeklong summer institute for 30 K-12 teachers in summer 2006; community conversations about race and identity in anticipation of the exhibit premiere in fall 2006 and during its run at SMM; forums and speakers (during the exhibition run in St. Paul, SMM and AAA will arrange a variety of local and national speakers and public forums on topics related to the exhibition); and a youth summit about race, planned and hosted by a paid team of eight to ten multicultural teenagers with adult guidance.
  • CA has lost more than 90% of its wetlands to development, which provide a resting place for many species of migrating birds and filters water draining into the bay.The project’s goals were to educate students about the local watershed and related conservation issues, empower them to feel more connected to their community and engage in positive change, and expose them to science and conservation-related careers. The Monterey Bay Aquarium worked with 40 PVHS teachers and administrators to offer three learning programs: a year-long class, a field trip to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and a summer field session.Monterey Bay Aquarium – Monterey, CA Year: 2010Amount: $150,000  Grant:Museums for America - Engaging CommunitiesThe Monterey Bay Aquarium will refocus and expand its professional development programs for teachers through a Teacher Institute Project. Over a three-year period, the aquarium will provide 450 teachers with new tools, skills, and support through fifteen year-long, grade-appropriate, teacher institutes. These teachers, in turn, will engage and inspire approximately 49,500 students to develop a connection to their local environment and gain the basic ocean science and critical thinking skills necessary to be effective citizens and ocean stewards. All teachers are also encouraged to participate in the aquarium’s online professional community, where they can network with their colleagues about their successes and roadblocks through wikis, blogs, and mentor connections.
  • Nearly 20% of people aged five and older have some type of long-lasting condition or disability (2000 U.S. Census). Since disability rates rise with age and the Baby Boom generation -- 78.3 million people born between 1946 and 1964 – is maturing, disability rates will inevitably climb.Queens Museum of Art – New York, NY Year: 2009Amount: $433,596  Grant:National Leadership Grants for Libraries - Library-Museum CollaborationThe Queens Museum of Art, in partnership with the Queens Library and Quality Services for the Autistic Community, will develop and implement a model community-based art therapy program for Spanish- speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorders. These non-English-speaking families face multiple challenges in trying to access library and museum services. The Queens Museum of Art and the Queens Library will reach out together and make their institutions more inviting to such families. Project activities include coordinated staff training on serving this underserved segment of the community, building the Queens Library’s Spanish-language collections on special needs subjects, and events to help these families connect. Over the three-year grant period, the project will produce 25 scheduled activities for families of children with autism spectrum disorders as well as two exhibitions of artwork by students with the disorders.
  • Participants ideas: -Needs -Aspiration -Transformation
  • Transcript

    1. Have You Thought About YourCultural Assets Lately? Marsha Semmel, Acting Director, IMLS Craigslist Foundation Boot Camp August 14, 2010
    2. What is IMLS?• IMLS is a U.S. federal government agency.• Our primary purpose is to make grants to the nation’s museums and libraries.• We also engage in research, evaluation, and data collection for the field.• Established in 1996.
    3. Our Mission• The Institute’s mission is to help build the capacity of libraries and museums: To connect people to information and ideas• The Institute is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.
    4. Purpose and Goals• IMLS has three key goals: – Sustain cultural heritage and knowledge; – Enhance learning and spur innovation; and – Support professional training so the staff of libraries and museums can be leaders in their communities.
    5. U.S. Museums and Libraries• 17,500 Museums • 123,000 Libraries – Art -Public – History -Academic – Science -School – Youth -Research – Aquaria -Archives – Planetaria – Arboreta – Zoos – Botanical Gardens
    6. Meeting Individual & Community Needs The Customer Pyramid (Conley, Peak: 2007)
    7. Combating Childhood ObesityChildren’s Museum of Manhattan – Adapts the We Can! Program created by the NIH to enhance early learning – Partnership with Bronx public housing - Collaboration with the Louisiana Children’s Museum and low-income communities in New Orleans
    8. Addressing Needs of ImmigrantsOrange County Public Library (FL) – Citizenship Inspired: a multifaceted learning experience for those seeking U.S. citizenship – One-on-one learning, learning in groups, live online learning, and self-paced online tutorials – Social networking to build collaborative communities
    9. Battling Substance AbuseHaines Borough Public Library – Voices Project partnership with KHNS public radio – Educate rural, native Alaskans about the impacts of drug and alcohol abuse – Storytelling and audio diaries illustrating the impacts of abuse – Dissemination via the radio and Web
    10. Meeting Mental Health NeedsMorikami Museum and Japanese Gardens – Partnership with College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University – Garden walks and guided imagery targeting depression – Online training manual for gardens and museums
    11. Supporting the HomelessYoung at Art of Broward (FL) – ArtREACH: afterschool arts and homework assistance program supporting mothers and their children through play and learning – Collaboration with the school board & two homeless shelters – Free museum memberships
    12. Serving the UnemployedProject Compass – OCLC WebJunction & the State Library of North Carolina – Links libraries nationwide to share strategies for helping unemployed patrons find work – Regional summits for state librarians to share best practices – Promoting statewide workforce development partnerships
    13. Building Cross-cultural UnderstandingInternational Coalition of Sites of Conscience – Build the capacity of 12 immigration history museums to facilitate dialogue around community immigration issues – Professional development for museum staff
    14. Enhancing Environmental LiteracyMonterey Bay Aquarium – Watsonville Area Teens Conserving Habitats (WATCH) program – Partnership with Pajaro Valley High School – Educate students about local conservation issues, connect and engage with their community, and expose them to science and conservation-related careers
    15. Increasing Accessibility & InclusionQueens Museum of Art – Community-based art therapy program for Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder – Partnership with the Queens Library and Quality Services for the Autistic Community
    16. How do We Reach the Top of thePyramid?
    17. IMLS E-communications • www.imls.gov • Primary Source: Free monthly e-mail update, sent to over 9,000 subscribers. • Twitter: @US_IMLS • IMLS RSS Feed: www.imls.gov/rss.xml • IMLS Podcasts: www.imls.gov/podcast.xml

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