Architecture for the masses - An Open Group Webinar

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An overview of the journey that Enterprise Architects has started in making the discipline of enterprise architecture available to a broader audience. The goal is to move it from the "black arts" space to be more accessible. This was done through the use of a MOOC.
The presentation discusses the education landscape and the business model disruption required. It then looks at where MOOCs fit into this disruption and introduces the EA MOOC journey.

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Architecture for the masses - An Open Group Webinar

  1. 1. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 31bringing architecture awareness toa much broader audience, insideand outside of the enterpriseCRAIGMARTIN-COO&CHIEFARCHITECT,ENTERPRISEARCHITECTSARCHITECTUREFOR THE MASSES
  2. 2. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 32mobile +61 419 192 929twitter @eatrainingemail craig.martin@enterprisearchitects.com
  3. 3. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 33Agenda› Context Setting - Utility 7 Differentiation.› Disruptive business models› Disruption in the Education Industry› Why is this important to business› Education Industry Business Models› Some MOOC theory› Why did EA decide to go MOOC› Breakdown the EA MOOC modules› Next Steps
  4. 4. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 34EA is a leading international provider of strategyand architecture services and capabilitiesChampioning Practice Awareness inthe Community• Chief Architect / CTO Round Tables• Virtual Teaming & PractitionerCollaboration• Open Group Participation• Industry EngagementLifetime Relationship with PractisingArchitects• Practitioner career lifecyclemanagement• Architecture training and certification• Professional development• Community involvement• PAYG payroll services• Learning forumsSkills Uplift for Organisations &Individuals• TOGAF® 9.1 Certification• ArchiMate® 2.0• Advanced / Applied EA• Business Architecture• Information Governance• Solution Architecture• BPMNStrategic Relationship WithCorporate Clients• Strategy & Architecture CapabilityImprovement• The delivery of strategic architectureoutcomes• Architecture delivery AcceleratorFrameworks• Resourcing & Talent• Managed ServicesLearningServicesArchitectServicesThoughtLeadershipEnterpriseServices
  5. 5. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 35Our experience in higher education
  6. 6. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 36Whats Business About?Utility(Foundation)InnovateBuild AdvantagesAssembleProlongAdvantagesMixReduceDisadvantagesDIFFERENTIATION
  7. 7. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 37ANALYTICALTHINKINGINTUITIVETHINKING* From Roger Martin (2009) The Design of BusinessGOAL: Reliably produceconsistent, predictableoutcomesGOAL: Produce outcomesthat meet desiredobjectivesWhere does value lie in business?True value lies in a balance of intuitive and analytical skillsUnresolvedBusinessChallengesHeuristics(Rules ofThumb)Robust, repeatableand replicableprocesses“All knowledge is connected to all otherknowledge. The fun is in making theconnections.”Arthur Aufderheide, Palaeopathologist andexpert on dissecting mummies“The society based on production is onlyproductive, not creative.”Albert Camus1913-1960, French author, journalist and philosopher
  8. 8. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 38True value comes from those who caninnovate, mix and assemble the bestCompanies with a high level of cohesion affect EBIT directly4%8%12%16%20%24%28%32%0 20 40 60 80 100 120EBITMARGIN,2003-2007CAPABILITIES COHERENCE SCORECoca-ColaWrigleyPepsiCoKimberly-ClarkSara LeeConAgraMerckUnileverH.J. HeinzKraftGeneral MillsCloroxCampbell Soup CompanyP&G*Adapted from “The Coherence Premium”Harvard Business Review, June 2010A coherent organisation is one that isthought of and executed as a whole
  9. 9. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 39But you still need the utilityUtility(Foundation)InnovateBuild AdvantagesAssembleProlongAdvantagesMixReduceDisadvantagesDIFFERENTIATIONIt’s the utility that allows you to build better mixes
  10. 10. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 310Finding the right business mixesThe Challenge is reducing the time it takes to move from the unresolved business challengesspace to the repeatable formulas space. The realm of methods and frameworksUnresolvedBusinessChallengesRules of thumbRobust, repeatableand replicableformulas & processesUltimately all innovativealgorithms will become utility.* From Roger Martin (2009) The Design of Business
  11. 11. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 311ANALYTICALTHINKINGINTUITIVETHINKING* From Roger Martin (2009) The Design of BusinessGOAL: Reliably produceconsistent, predictableoutcomesGOAL: Produce outcomesthat meet desiredobjectivesFinding the right skillsThe challenge is also identifying the right skills in the organisation that are able to traversethe domains of innovative intuitive thinking, and reliable analytical thinking.NPVEVAOperationManagementQualityManagementCorporateGovernanceEnterprisePatternsPortfolioAnalysisIT GovernanceValueEngineeringPRINCE2Six Sigma& LoanBusinessIntelligenceStrategicTraceabilityFinancialModellingInnovationManagementBusinessAnalysisDatavisualisationTalentManagementSystemThinkingMissionBusinessModel DesignStakeholderValueTOGAFCostEngineeringSolutionArchitectureKnowledgeEcosystemSixThinkingHatsCollectiveIntelligenceGamificationCrowdsourcingChangeManagementPerceptionManagementWickedProblemsEnvironmentalScanningBrandManagementIntegrativeThinkingGoalsCapabilityFive ForcesRoot CauseAnalysisProductManagement
  12. 12. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 312Creating the right balance of skills inan organisation is a recipe for successOrchestrating the balance
  13. 13. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 313The more of the utility that can bedeveloped in a standardised manner,the more it frees us up to be creativeOrchestrating the balance
  14. 14. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 314Mixing differentlycreates disruption
  15. 15. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 315Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…This ‘telephone’ has too manyshortcomings to be seriously consideredas a means of communication. The deviceis inherently of no value to us.WEST UNION INTERNATIONAL MEMO. 1876
  16. 16. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 316Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…I have travelled the length and breadthof this country and walked with thebest people, and I can assure you thatdata processing is a fad that won’t lastout the year.THE EDITOR OF MANAGEMENT BOOKS AT PRENTICE-HALL, 1957
  17. 17. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 317Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…I think there is a world market formaybe five computers.THOMAS WATSON, CHAIRMAN OF IBM, 1943
  18. 18. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 318Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…There is no reason why anyone wouldwant a computer in their own home.KEN OLSEN, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER OF DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORP, 1977
  19. 19. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 319Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…You can’t offer a product for free fortoo long and survive, it’s a passing fad.TELCO CEO WHEN ASKED HIS OPINION ON SKYPE
  20. 20. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 320Disruptive Business ModelsPrediction…Theres no way offering free onlinetraining will work, theres no businessmodel thereANONYMOUS… (SORT OF)
  21. 21. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 321What is disruption?› Innovation that creates a newmarket› Innovation that creates a newvalue network› Eventually disrupts an existingmarket and value network› Displaces an earlier offering ortechnologyEXAMPLES OF DISRUPTIVE BUSINESS MODELS:» Apple and their reduced switching costs andincreased barriers to entry» Nespresso and their recurring revenues model» Dell and their “earn before you spend” model» Facebook and their “getting others to do thework” model» Xerox and the pay per use model» Google and the micro-advertising model» Amazon and their long tail model
  22. 22. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 322When does disruption occur?› First stage of disruption, an innovatormakes a product much more affordableand simpler to use (for the user) thanwhat currently exists.› The second stage of disruption is whenadditional technological change isadded which makes it simpler and lessexpensive to build and maintain theproducts.› The new change eventually displacesthe existing market and value network,resulting in a radical improvement inperformanceDisruptive technologies take a while to change the marketChristensen, Clayton M. (2010-09-06).Disrupting Class, Expanded Edition: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World LearnsPERFORMANCETIMEMarket for oldtechnologyMarket for newtechnologyNew replacesold technology
  23. 23. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 323BLUE OCEAN Create uncontested markets Make competition irrelevant Create & Capture newdemand Break value / costtrade-off Align with differentiationAND low costRED OCEAN Compete in existingmarkets Beat the competition Explore existing demand Make the value/costtrade-off Align with differentiationOR low costWhy does disruption occur?
  24. 24. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 324› Turned off to school› Focused on passing the next test› Not excited by the classroom› No application to life after school› Discouraged from following their own interests› Knowledge = gradual accumulation of rightanswers acquired through effort and obedience tothe instructor› Role of the instructor is to TEACH them› Right answers for everything existMOTIVATION? RELEVANCE?AUTHENTICITY?Why is disruptionrequired ineducation?From an article by Roger Shank,Engines for Education
  25. 25. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 325› Prescribed Curriculum› Whiteboards› Desks in rows› Books and worksheets› Paper & pencil› Focus on the front (teacher)› Read, take notes› Study as an individual› Take tests to measure learningTRADITIONAL CLASSROOMWhy is disruptionrequired ineducation?From an article by Roger Shank,Engines for Education
  26. 26. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 326Why is disruption required in education?› These companies bring inputs ofmaterials into one end of theirpremises, transform them by addingvalue, and deliver higher-valueproducts to their customers at theother end.› Most schools and universitiescurrently operate like a VAP business.› Students are herded into a classroomat the beginning of the school year,value is added to them, and they’repromoted to the next grade at year’send.› It’s a form of mass production on anassembly lineTraditional education’s present value network is largely a VAP business1. PREPARE &PRODUCE TEXTBOOKS& OTHERINSTRUCTIONALMATERIALS6. TEACHERTRAINING5. TESTING ANDASSESSMENT2. ADOPTIONDECISIONS FORCONTENT ANDCURRICULA3. DELIVERCONTENT TOSTUDENTS4. INDIVIDUALASSISTANCE*Øystein Fjeldstad and Charles StabellValue Added Processes (VAP) businesses model
  27. 27. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 327CHANGE ISNEEDED?
  28. 28. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 328A new generation isentering the workforce› Lack trust in corporations andgovernment› Focus on personal success› Have a short-term career perspective› Gets easily bored› Extremely independent› See no clear boundary between workand life› Empowered and optimistic› Sacrifice economic rewards for work-life balance› Expect to work anytime, anyplace› Connect with people in new anddistinctive ways› Comfortable with globalization› Racially and culturally diverse * The Consumer Insights ThinkTank
  29. 29. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 329A newgeneration isentering theworkforce› Generation Y is plugged-in 24 hours a day, 7 days a week› Willing to trade high pay for fewer billable hours, flexible schedules and abetter work/life balance.› Generation Y is confident, ambitious and achievement-oriented. They havehigh expectations of their employers, seek out new challenges and are notafraid to question authority.› Generation Y wants meaningful work and a solid learning curve.› They value teamwork and seek the input and affirmation of others. Part of ano-person-left-behind generation, Generation Y is loyal, committed andwants to be included and involved.› Generation Y craves attention in the forms of feedback and guidance. Theyappreciate being kept in the loop and seek frequent praise andreassurance. Generation Y may benefit greatly from mentors who can helpguide and develop their young careers.› Gen Y is not just “online”…it is more complex than that… they switch ONand OFF - while X wear online more as a badge - Y is more sceptical› Beyond the push button paradigm of Boomer interaction Y technology isan extension of them.
  30. 30. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 33047%and is projected to be 47%of the workforce by 2014.25%Generation Y is currently 25%of the workforce
  31. 31. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 331An incorrect view of the next generationThe problem isnt that Johnny cantread. The problem isnt even thatJohnny cant think. The problem is thatJohnny doesnt know what thinking is;he confuses it with feeling.THOMAS SOWELL
  32. 32. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 332The world of educationis changing
  33. 33. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 333technological change is added whichmakes it simpler and less expensive tobuild and maintain productsSTAGE 2DISRUPTION ISOCCURRING
  34. 34. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 334Education DisruptionSOLUTION SHOPS› Employ experienced, intuitivelytrained experts whose job is todiagnose problems andrecommend solutions.FACILITATED NETWORKS› Customers exchange with each other.› Participation in the network typically isn’t theprimary profit engine for participants.› Rather, the network is a supportinginfrastructure that helps the buyers and sellersmake money elsewhere.› The company that makes money in a facilitatednetwork is the one that facilitates the network.This has opened up the space for othervalue networks in education
  35. 35. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 335EducationDisruption› It is rare for a disruption to appear in just one part of avalue network without the rest of the system changing,too.› When a disruption arises, a new value network almostalways emerges to replace the existing one if thedisruption is to be successful.› The reason the whole value network must be replacedfor a disruption to occur is that, in each stage, theactors’ business models, economic incentives, andrhythms of innovation and technological paradigms areconsistent and mutually reinforcing.› Companies with disruptive economics simply are notplug-compatible with the old value network.› What this means is that the entire system for creatingeducation materials, making the decisions about whichmaterials to adopt, and delivering the content tostudents must, and will, change.› It is this second stage of disruption in public educationthat will cause the world to “flip” and make student-centric online technology a reality.
  36. 36. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 336But first….lets lookat some ismsNeed stock photo
  37. 37. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 337Knowing how to find information is becomingmore important than knowing the informationDef_ConnectivismThe theory of learning which emphasizes the role of the social andcultural context opposed the individual. Central to connectivism is therelationship between work experience, learning and knowledge, asexpressed in the concept of ‘connectivity’, thus the root of thetheorys name. Emphasises the learners ability to navigate theinformation. The Pipe is more important than the content within thepipeGEORGE SIEMENS & STEPHEN DOWNESEnterprise Architects, March 2011 Slide 37
  38. 38. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 338Learners must create own meanings based onindividual experiences and interactionsDef_ConstructivismA theory to explain how knowledge is constructed in the humanbeing when information comes into contact with existing knowledgethat had been developed by experiences. To generate knowledgeand meaning from your own experience and interactions. Knowledgecannot be “transmitted”ELIZABETH MURPHYEnterprise Architects, March 2011 Slide 38
  39. 39. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 339“Knowledge cannot beheld by the few - In vainhave you acquiredknowledge if you have notimparted it to others.”DEUTERONOMY RABBAH(C.900, AN HOMILETIC COMMENTARY ON THEBOOK OF DEUTERONOMY)“Knowledge is like money:to be of value it mustcirculate, and in circulatingit can increase in quantityand, hopefully, in value.”LOUIS L’AMOUR(1908-1988, AMERICAN AUTHOR)What do the isms mean for disruption?The New Value Network for EducationThe Old Value NetworkEducation DisruptionKnowledgeheld by a fewKnowledge heldby the many
  40. 40. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 340Education Disruption› Platforms that facilitate the creation of user-generated content.› Simple to develop online learning products that students will be able to build products thathelp them teach other students.› Parents will be able to assemble tools to tutor their children.› Teachers will be able to create tools to help the different types of learners in theirclassrooms.› Rather than being “pushed” into classrooms through a centralized selection process, theywill be pulled into use through self-diagnosis—by teachers, parents, and students.› Facilitated networks, not VAP businesses, will be the business models of distribution.› Ultimately, people will assemble learning modules together into entire courses whoseapproach is truly student-centric—custom-configured to each different type of learner.What will this facilitated value network look like?Connectivism + Constructivism = The facilitated value network
  41. 41. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 341The student centric classroomThe disruption will alter the entire value chain and place the student at the centreFaculty& StaffCONTENTCLASSESSOCIALINTERACTIONLECTURERSSTUDENTSStudents& SocialInteractionCONTENTCLASSESFACILITATORSFACULTYSTAFF
  42. 42. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 342The student centric classroom› For several years, most teachers and students will still have conventional textbooks.› But little by little, textbooks will give way to computer-based online courses—increasinglyaugmented by user-generated student-centric learning tools.› The second, or student-centric, stage of this disruption will move to the mainstream whenusers and teachers start piecing together enough tool modules to create entire coursesdesigned for each type of learner.› At some point, administrators, education committees, and unions will recognize that evenwithout explicit administrative decisions ever having been made, student-centric learninghas become mainstream.› Analysis done by Clayton Christensen, suggests that this will happen in approximately2014, when online courses have a 25 precent market share› The Disruption is more about the role of the teacher than the change to the classroom› Instead of spending most of their time delivering one-size-fits-all lessons year after year,teachers can spend much more of their time traveling from student to student to helpindividuals with individual problems.The Disruption Journey
  43. 43. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 343The student centric classroom› Instead of spending most of their time delivering one-size-fits-all lessons year after year, teachers can spend muchmore of their time traveling from student to student to help individuals with individual problems.› Teachers will act more as learning coaches and tutors to help students find the learning approach that makes themost sense for them.› They will mentor and motivate them through the learning with the aid of real-time computer data on how the studentis learning.› This means, however, that they will need very different skills to add value in this future from the skills with whicheducation schools are equipping them today.› Since customization will be a major driver and benefit of this shift to student-centric online technology, increasinglyteachers will have to be able to understand differences in students and be able to provide individual assistance that iscomplementary to the learning model each student is using.› Because student-centric technology allows for far more personalized attention from a teacher, we can do somethingcounterintuitive in education—increase the number of students per live teacher.› Facilitating this disruption of instruction has the potential to break the expensive trade-offs in which school districtshave been trapped so that individual teachers can do a better job and give individual attention to more students.› As a result, there potentially will be more funds to pay teachers better.The Disruption is more about the role of the teacher than the change to the classroom
  44. 44. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 344
  45. 45. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 345
  46. 46. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 346What is a MOOC?*mathplourde
  47. 47. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 347Enter the cMOOC’s› cMOOC = Connectivist MOOC› Learners are encouraged to contribute actively, usingthese digital platforms.› Participants’ contributions in form of blog posts, tweetsetc. are aggregated by course organizers and sharedwith all participants via daily email or newsletter.Participants from all over the world can connect share,contribute, collaborate to learn and expand theirnetwork professionally and personally.› cMOOCs are also open and flexible, responsive to needsof its participants which can provide a tailored learningexperience.A cMOOC is a version of a student centricfacilitated network“As soon as I had toprepare for class andteach it, I understood it!”In teaching others weteach ourselves.TRADITIONAL PROVERB
  48. 48. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 348Enter the xMOOC’s› xMOOC is content related not social related –pushed out to people and not students creatingcontent as in cMOOC› Rather than a group of individuals building thecourse as in a cMOOC, an xMOOC usually has oneor more higher education colleges or schoolsbehind it, and, in some cases, a for-profit company› Udadicty/Coursera/edX are referred to as examplesof xMOOCsAn xMOOC is a more traditional value networkmodel
  49. 49. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 349MOOCS are stilltraversing thedisruption curveDisruption across the industryis still a work in progressxMOOCcMOOC
  50. 50. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 350Why areUniversitiesturning to MOOCs› Getting on Board› Reach new audiences› Influence students who mayenrol in their institution.› Attracted students fromaround the world and “feederschools”› Brand buildingSINCE THERE IS NO SIGNIFICANT BUSINESSMODEL (YET)
  51. 51. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 351Why are Universities turning to MOOCsPOSSIBLE BUSINESSMODELSRECRUITMENT FEECONTENT FEEPLATFORM FEEBROKERAGE FEEADVERTISING FEEREFERRAL / FEEDER FEEASSESSMENT FEE
  52. 52. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 352What is it Like toStudy in MOOC?MY OWN EXPERIENCE Learning vs. certifying Synchronous vs.Asynchronous Mobile vs. PC Seamless vs. Disjointed Constructivism andConnectivism
  53. 53. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 354Why is Enterprise Architectsinterested in MOOCS?› We are developing some disruption of our own› Understanding of the foundation frees you up tofocus on differentiation› The architecture discipline has been around for awhile - the rate at which it shows value mustaccelerate› TREND: SIMPLER - We need to makearchitecture simpler› We want to enable the business mixers› Provide the tools for connectivism andconsutructivismOur Journey to the isms
  54. 54. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 355Keeping knowledge erodes power.Sharing is the fuel to our growth engine.In today’s environment, hoarding knowledgeultimately erodes your power.If you know something very important,the way to get power is by actually sharing it.JOSEPH L. BADARACCO(*1948, PROFESSOR OF BUSINESS ETHICS AT HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL)Enterprise Architects, March 2011 Slide 55
  55. 55. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 356What has EA done?68 000 VIEWS AND COUNTING
  56. 56. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 357The creation of hybrid models
  57. 57. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 358› The course is targeted at non-architects to give an overview of thearchitecture discipline and theTOGAF framework› Attendees will be required to view40 instructional videos over 4 hours› Each video is 4-8 minutes long withan assessment question› A completion certificate will beissued after assessment› Attendees can view the videos attheir own leisure but are required tocomplete it before the classroomweek.Introduction to Architectureusing TOGAFPhase 1 – xMOOC(SYNCHRONOUS, “FACULTY” DRIVENAND CONTENT DRIVEN)
  58. 58. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 35910 Topics PLUS Assessment› Topic 1: Welcome› Topic 2: What is Enterprise Architecture?› Topic 3: What is a framework?› Topic 4: Introducing TOGAF› Topic 5: Organising building blocks› Topic 6: Establishing a common language› Topic 7: Managing architecture knowledge› Topic 8: Creating and using buildingblocks› Topic 9: Visualising the building blocks› Topic 10: Capability based planningAn Enterprise ArchitectureFrameworkMOOC Module 1
  59. 59. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 3609 Topics PLUS Assessment› Topic 1: Dealing with complexity› Topic 2: ADM iterations› Topic 3: Establishing a vision› Topic 4: View, viewpoints and concerns› Topic 5: The architecture developmentiteration› Topic 6: Business scenario technique› Topic 7: Developing business architecture› Topic 8: Developing data architecture› Topic 9: Developing applicationarchitecture› Topic 10: Developing technologyarchitectureEnterprise ArchitectureDevelopmentMOOC Module 2ACLAustraclear ExigoBAFBloombergCashflow ReportingComBizCorporate OnlineHEDNavision (AP)Navision (AR)Navision (Assets)Navision (Cash Management)Navision (GL)Navision (PO)Navision (Project Costing)Navision (Resource Costing)NemPower - NemFutureProcuregateProcureMaxSmartData OnlineVisual RiskFleetWatch00.10.20.30.40.50.60.70.80.911.10 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1.1BusinessValueITValueApplicationPortfolioView (Finance & TreasurySystems)BusinessValue vs IT ValueKeep MaintainingUpgrade TechnologyLeverage TechnologyRetire or ReplaceBusinessMedianIT Median
  60. 60. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 3618 Topics PLUS Assessment› Topic 1: The architecture transitioniteration› Topic 2: Identifying business opportunitiesand solutions› Topic 3: Implementation techniques› Topic 4: Migration planning› Topic 5: Implementation governance› Topic 6: The realisation iteration› Topic 7: Architecture change management› Topic 8: Requirements management› Topic 9: The role of business analysisTransformation PlanningMOOC Module 3
  61. 61. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 3628 Topics PLUS Assessment› Topic 1: Developing a capability› Topic 2: The mandate› Topic 3: The governance structure› Topic 4: Improving the maturity› Topic 5: Understanding roles and skills› Topic 6: Career paths for enterprisearchitects› Topic 7: Example: SOA as an architecturalstyle› Topic 8: SummaryEstablishing an ArchitecturePracticeMOOC Module 4InformationApplicationsBusiness TechnologyTechnology WatchHealth AssessmentAsset LifecycleTechnology PrinciplesCONTEXTUAL Info Mgt PrinciplesInfo Use PoliciesHealth AssessmentApplication PrinciplesB-IT StrategyPrinciplesCapability Req’sTech Reference ModelCurrent StateFuture StateService CatalogueCONCEPTUALMeta-Data DefinitionSubject ClassificationInformation ClassificationReference Data StdsApplication FrameworkCurrent StateTarget StateServices DefinitionsValue StreamsProcess MapsFunction ModelsService DefinitionLOGICALData DictionaryEnterprise Info ModelData quality processesFunction ModelsWiring DiagramsActivity ViewsPatternsUse CasesProcess ModelsMud Maps (N/W, etc)Technology StandardsPHYSICAL Data DirectoryDeployment ModelIntegration ViewApplication StandardsWorkflowsEnvironment managementIMPLEMENTATIONDB Schema & Field LevelViewsClass/Module ViewConfiguration ModelsOperating proceduresEnterprise ArchitectSolution Architect(domain & project focus)InfrastructureArchitectSystemAdministratorApplicationDesignerData ArchitectApplicationArchitectInformationArchitectHead of ArchitectureBusinessArchitectBusinessAnalyst
  62. 62. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 363Where tofrom here?
  63. 63. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 364Where to next?› Teams, peer-to-peer› Engagement & experience› Visual & kinesthetic› Things that matterCONTINUING THE ..ISM JOURNEYThe store of wisdom does not consist of hard coinswhich keep their shape as they pass from hand tohand; it consists of ideas and doctrines whosemeanings change with the minds that entertain them.JOHN PLAMENATZ(1912-1975, MONTENEGRIN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHER)
  64. 64. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 365› Module 1 – Introduction into the TOGAF Framework» Context setting and landscape of the TOGAF framework› Module 2 – Organizing Architecture Content» A detailed view of the various mechanisms for organizingarchitecture content using the continuum, repository,metamodel and content framework› Module 3 – Tools and Techniques» An overview of governance, business scenarios,stakeholder management, building blocks, maturitymodels, capability based planning, partitioning anditeration› Module 4 – Developing Architectures» A full spin through all the phases of the ADM addressing allthe key learning outcomes› Module 5 – Building Architecture Capability» A look at how to build architecture teams and skillsTwo Day Classroom intensive. Theory coveringthe basic learning objectives of TOGAFPhase 2 – F2FTheory
  65. 65. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 366› An interactive workshop environmentusing tools and techniques to teachattendees how to execute a TOGAF ADMcycle› The use of team dynamics and breakoutsto develop a strategic and segmentarchitecture for a corporation› Complemented by examples and actualartefacts from similar engagementsThree day interactive, practicalworkshops taking the attendeesthrough a hands on businessproblemPhase 3 –InteractiveWorkshops
  66. 66. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 367Day 1 – Example FormatPhase 3 –InteractiveWorkshops› Individual leaderboard scoresattendees TOPICS to prepare themfor the TOGAF exam› Team leaderboard scores teambased on problem resolution usingTOGAF techniques› Team 1 - develop the business motivation model› Team 2 – develop the draft architecture vision document and statement of architecture work› All teams develop business scenarios based on the motivation model› Teams break up and focus on the development of the architecture vision across the BDAT› Each team develops a skeleton statement of architecture work and includes estimates andefforts› Teams score each others efforts – the course leaderboard is updated at each completionstage» Rewards badges are issued to individuals at team level.› Team 1 develops future state business capability model› Team 2 develops current state business capability model› Team 3 develops views and viewpoints› Team 4 develops reference models› Design the architecture landscape to address the business problem› Recommend potential architecture partitions› Complete the maturity model and plan roadmap for the EA transition› Develop a draft metamodel› Source potential content into the continuum and repository› Score individuals through peer and facilitator scoring› Develop teaming model based on initial scores› Brief team on strengths and weaknesses from personality profiles› Communicate business problem› Provide the completed request for architecture work
  67. 67. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 369What canyou do? › Make learning interactive &experiential› Consider peer-to-peer approaches› Utilize real-world applications› Emphasize information literacy incourses› Encourage reflection› Incorporate collaborative learning› Use informal learning opportunities› Create opportunities for synthesis
  68. 68. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 370Find the rightbalance action reflectionvisual textsocial individualprocess contentspeed deliberationpeer-to-peer peer review
  69. 69. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 371Register for the TOGAF Open2Study MOOChttps://www.open2study.com/subjects/introduction-to-enterprise-architecture
  70. 70. | ARCHITECTURE FOR THE MASSES | ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTS © 201 372Questions?

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