Developing a UX Lead ProgramEnable a successful user experience fromideation to deployment
Before we get started, let’s welcomea new team member                                       2
How‟s that feel?         We call this the Noise         & Confusion problem.It‟s rampant even amongsenior, experienced peo...
What we hear in our trainings…                           “I‟ve been here                           for five years, andSr. ...
What we tell them…It makes perfectly good sense to be confused. This is a massiveorganization with years of history. Group...
WHAT IS A UX LEADPROGRAM?                    6
What exactly is a UX Lead Program?A set of tools, expectations and waysof being (for key UX team membersto serve as “Leads...
In their own words: What is a UX Lead Program?         “It‟s what I do anyway; it‟s just a process to work with         pa...
TODAY’S AGENDA                 9
What we’ll cover today•Definition, pain points, context•Components•Process of making it happen•Nuts & bolts, questions    ...
Our intention is for this to beactionable, not theoretical.We‟ll provide time throughout the dayto reflect and help each o...
First, let’s see who’s in the room.                                      12
INTRODUCTIONS                13
•   Richard hearts complexity                            •   It‟s all about successful delivery                           ...
• Craig hearts complexity                            • Awasu Design                            • Bolt | Peters User Experi...
Let‟s take a step back.          What does UX          Leadership mean?What is UX Leadership relative tothe rest of the or...
CONTEXT          17
Product development has beenaround for a while.      While user experience is      relatively new.                        ...
UX Leadership is about moreinfluence and strategic impact.      People have been talking      about this for a few years… ...
Louis Rosenfeld (2002 blog post)Evangelizing User Experience Design on Ten Dollars a Day•The ROI Case•Going to the videota...
21
Five approaches• Document and evangelize UX work• Calculate ROI• Conduct ethnographic research• Determine best ownership o...
The Business of Customer Experience:Lessons I Learned at Wells FargoSecil WatsonSVP, Channel StrategyWells Fargo          ...
24
Four approaches   • Facilitate partnerships   • Invest in a highly visible success   • Deliver results quickly   • Improve...
This is the heart of a UX Lead program      • Facilitate partnerships      • Improve the day-to-day effectiveness and exec...
But wait…       It‟s not just the UX‟ers       who are confused.Who else is involved in a productdevelopment lifecycle?   ...
NOISE & CONFUSION 2                      28
Activity              • Pick one of the roles                        listed on the wall and putWhat do non-UX‟ers      you...
“Tell me again the                  difference                  between aProject Manager   wireframe and a                ...
“What am I           v         looking at?”Sponsor(Line of Business)   “Why does it cost                     this much?”  ...
32
33
PAIN POINTS              34
35
Activity              • Think about pain pointsWhat‟s your pain?                        at your organization that         ...
Pain points we’ve observed•Inconsistent engagement•UX Mgrs doing too much•UX contributors overworked & overwhelmed•Project...
Pain points we’ve observed•UX team members not equipped with the language of the business and project management, therefor...
UCD STEPS            40
Sample User Centered Design ProcessUnfortunately, our business partners are not experts in user centered design.          ...
42
Foundational Pieces of UX Lead Program•(User Centered Design Toolkit)•UX Brief•One Sheeters•UX Lead Guide / manual / onlin...
Foundational Pieces of UX Lead Program UCD Toolkit               UX Brief      One-                             Sheeters  ...
UX Brief   One-           Sheeters                      45
UX Brief – Starting a Project Right                                       The old way (risky business)We‟ve got this proje...
UX Brief – Starting a Project Right                                      The new way (as UX Lead)We‟ve got this project th...
UX Brief – Starting a Project Right         What did we just hear?          Why do we care?               Benefits?       ...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightProject OverviewHi there, I‟ve read through the resource request form and theattached b...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightApproach/High-Level UCD PlanHere‟s how we can help. First, we‟ll need to understand the...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightApproach/High-Level UCD Plan (continued)At this point we‟ll have a defined strategy for...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightResourcesI‟ll be serving as the Interaction Designer on the project andalso the Lead on...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightAssumptions & RisksOne more thing, it‟s really important that this is a collaborativeef...
UX Brief – Starting a Project RightTable of Contents for a Brief•Project Overview•Project Approach•High-Level Plan•Resourc...
Preparing the Brief for a very simple projectManager forwards              RequestResource Request               Form     ...
Preparing the Brief for larger projectsManager talks to partner      Partner sends PPT         Mgr asks for resource reque...
UX Brief as email                                UX Brief as documentThanks for the phone call today. Just torecap, we‟re ...
I got the UX Brief, but I‟m still                            not sure what a site map is.Why are we doing  this activity? ...
ONE-SHEETERS               59
One-SheetersPut simply, the One-Sheeters are one-pagerepresentations of a UCD activity or tool. Theyanswer the questions w...
THE PLANNING STAGE                     61
Most UCD Processes involve these stages                   The UX Lead program adds a deliberate stage to set              ...
Stage 0 – Project Set Up                           UX Brief       One-                …                                   ...
UX STRATEGY              64
What it Means to be a Consultative Partner                                        The old way (a few weeks into the projec...
What it Means to be a Consultative Partner                                      The old way (it might go smoothly)Here are...
What it Means to be a Consultative Partner                                            The old way (it might not go so well...
So, what went wrong? The business partners                    But they still weren‟t on the received a Brief and          ...
69
UX GUIDE           70
The guide covers:UX Lead   • Company historyGuide     • How the organization is structured          • Groups throughout th...
CHECKLISTS             72
Everyone loves checklistsYou will have to decide which tasks andprocesses make sense to structure with achecklist. What fo...
Example checklists:UX LeadGuide     • Receive Assignment          • Create Relationships          • Question, Listen, & Le...
TRAINING           75
Considerations for Training• Who to train• When to train• Trainings as co-creation of the program (participation versus pr...
STAGES FOR DEVELOPINGA UX LEAD PROGRAM                        78
Remember, every situation isdifferent.            Some of these stages will            apply to you…and some of them won‟t...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
Discovery StageMain goal• Understand what needs to be done. What‟s working? Not  working? What‟s wanted?Additional goals• ...
Discovery Stage•Identify key people to involve•Gather and analyze data•Conduct interviews                                 ...
Discovery StageA big part of the discovery phaseinvolves interviews.                                 As many people as pos...
Who We’ve InterviewedWithin the UX team              Beyond the UX team• Individual Contributors and   • Business Analysts...
Activity              • Write down the peopleWho to interview?                        who would be most                   ...
What We’ve Learned• In most cases, the UX team members are professional,  well meaning, conscientious, and hard working.• ...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
PlanIt‟s only after discovery that you canreally know what the solution can be.             Work with stakeholders and    ...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
CreateCreate simple solutions with key people.          Remember to keep the solutions          simple. You don‟t want to ...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
IterateTest out materials with a couple keypeople both in and outside the UX team.             Gather feedback from UX    ...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
LaunchIf you‟ve incrementally piloted and iterated, the“launch” will be less disruptive.                Launch often invol...
Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and s...
ImprovePosition the “launch” as just astarting point.             Assign a program manager.Plan for managers to work with ...
CONTINUATION SYSTEMS                       97
Keeping the Program Going• Communicate outwardly as road show or organic• Managers working with direct reports during roll...
WHO SHOULD BE A LEAD?                        100
This question must be answered by eachorganization. Some organizations havedesigners serve dual purpose on aproject: lead ...
UX Producer (Delivery Manager)Many organizations have a role in the User Experienceteam that focuses on managing the succe...
Activity          • What would work best forWhat would work                    your organization:best at your        – A t...
WAYS OF BEING                104
UX Lead as Facilitator & EducatorUX personnel juggle many          The UX Lead facilitatesmoving parts:                   ...
UX Lead as Facilitator & EducatorTypical Technical Skills for UX:   Facilitation & Educational Skills:• Persona developmen...
Don‟t underestimate how foreign userexperience activities are to people outsidethe UX team.                               ...
Consulting SkillsPeter Block‟s work is instructive for UX Leads. We‟ll coverthree concepts here:• Authenticity• Contractin...
Ways of Engaging•   Engagement instead of mandate or persuasion•   Participation instead of presentation•   Difficult publ...
Leading Internally and ExternallyWithin the UX team                  Beyond the UX team• Motivate the team                ...
One final takeaway:Commitment is more importantthan perfection                               111
Remaining Questions?Craig Peterscraig@awasudesign.com@craigpetersRichard Charetterichard.charette@awasudesign.com         ...
APPENDIX           113
What internal consultants want from their boss• A clear definition of the job before I am sent out on a project• Access to...
What internal consultants want from their clients• A clear definition of the job• Access to the person who really represen...
Reminders for your interviewsYour roleYou might already have a relationship with them. Tell themthat for this engagement, ...
Reminders for your interviewsPrior knowledge of the effortIf you‟re embarking on a UX Lead effort, it‟s likely they willha...
Reminders for your interviewsHow projects happen todayYou‟re looking for their understanding of the nuts and boltsof how p...
Reminders for your interviewsUncovering what is and isn’t workingYou can ask directly: What’s working? What’s not working?...
Reminders for your interviewsOther modelsOftentimes people‟s vision narrows when they work in oneenvironment. This is to o...
Reminders for your interviewsFuture look-backThis helps reveal what‟s truly important to them.Imagine looking back on this...
Other Pieces of UX Teams• User Centered Design toolkit• Project request process• Design patterns• UCD process• Onboarding•...
THANK YOU!Craig Peterscraig@awasudesign.com@craigpetersRichard Charetterichard.charette@awasudesign.com                   ...
Developing a ux lead program
Developing a ux lead program
Developing a ux lead program
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Developing a ux lead program

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You want your design team to have greater influence? Start from within: elevate your designers’ tools, capabilities, and stature by developing a UX Lead program. This is not theoretical; you will see how this has been done and you will learn how to do it yourself.

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  • AS PARTICIPANTS WALK INAs participants walk in, let’s have a way for people to get engaged (with us, the concept, prior knowledge, each other, examples that we have on the wall). I’d like to know more about who’s in the room. Ideas: - Richard or I greet everyone (requires that we’re available) - As people enter, they write their job titles on a card and stick it to a large piece of paper - We create some categories of job titles before they walk in and they write their name on a piece of paper and put it in the section that best matches their job
  • <Take answers randomly from the crowd>Designers can’t be at their best when they’re like this.Transition: I’d worked with a big Fortune 100 company for a few months putting together a UX Lead program with them. Near the end of the engagement, I conducted some trainings. It was the first time that I ran this activity and I have to admit I was worried that it was going to be a waste of time for the more senior people in the room. I thought they were going to thing “this is just for onboarding; come on, let’s get to the advanced stuff.” <advance to next slide>
  • Continued from transition: As soon as I asked how that felt, one of the more respected and accomplished Sr. Interaction Designers raised his hand and said <reveal quote>.
  • We surveyed team members who have been serving as UX Leads. We asked them, What is the UX Lead program?
  • Create large format printout of the day’s outline. Put a couple of them on the wall in the room. 12x18?
  • I’m sure there’s a better way to say this. Or maybe a diagram?
  • Facilitators go to the paper on the wall where people have put their note cards of their name, job title/role, and company. Call out names and ask them to identify themselves in the room. Welcome them. Do this for all 24 people. 20 seconds each = 8 minutes.
  • This is for context; setting the stage. Move quickly through these slides.
  • Create large format printout of the day’s outline. Put a couple of them on the wall in the room. 12x18?
  • Facilitated partnerships. Killian Evers. Senior Manager of Program Management in User Experience & Design and Product Planning for PayPal.It is accepted in the HCI research community that incorporating human-centered design into a structured approach to developing software is important. However, incorporating human-centered design into an established system development lifecycle is fraught with challenges: process integration; prejudices and organizational politics; resource constraints; and the desire for continual process improvement to ensure optimal performance [4]. A few organizations have discovered an unlikely solution to resolve these obstacles, in the form of UX program managers. Program managers are tasked to think beyond the UX organization to create essential partnerships with other parts of the larger organization that can help drive UX organizations to premiere positions within corporations.Investing in a highly visible success. Find a highly visible project that has a lot of potential for ROI, focus lots of resources on it, and evangelize the hell out of it. Deliver Results quickly. Laurie Pattison. Senior Director of User Experience at Oracle.You only get one chance to make a first impression. Convincing others where you work of the value of UX is no different. Unless you're part of that rare breed whose past experience is so vast and consistently successful, you have a very short time – usually no more than one calendar quarter -- to deliver spectacular results. Whether you're new to an organization, or just newly assigned to a project, you need to adopt some of the strategies and habits required to demonstrate results quickly.Day-to-day effectiveness and execution of UX personnel. Craig Peters. None of the other strategies will matter
  • Facilitated partnerships. Killian Evers. Senior Manager of Program Management in User Experience & Design and Product Planning for PayPal.It is accepted in the HCI research community that incorporating human-centered design into a structured approach to developing software is important. However, incorporating human-centered design into an established system development lifecycle is fraught with challenges: process integration; prejudices and organizational politics; resource constraints; and the desire for continual process improvement to ensure optimal performance [4]. A few organizations have discovered an unlikely solution to resolve these obstacles, in the form of UX program managers. Program managers are tasked to think beyond the UX organization to create essential partnerships with other parts of the larger organization that can help drive UX organizations to premiere positions within corporations.Investing in a highly visible success. Find a highly visible project that has a lot of potential for ROI, focus lots of resources on it, and evangelize the hell out of it. Deliver Results quickly. Laurie Pattison. Senior Director of User Experience at Oracle.You only get one chance to make a first impression. Convincing others where you work of the value of UX is no different. Unless you're part of that rare breed whose past experience is so vast and consistently successful, you have a very short time – usually no more than one calendar quarter -- to deliver spectacular results. Whether you're new to an organization, or just newly assigned to a project, you need to adopt some of the strategies and habits required to demonstrate results quickly.Day-to-day effectiveness and execution of UX personnel. Craig Peters. None of the other strategies will matter <reveal first yellow highlight> This last one used to be our main focus of a UX Lead program, but we realize now that it needs to be focused both externally and internally, which is what Killian was talking about here <reveal second yellow highlight>--- --- ---UX Leadership should be put in the context of project leadership. Again, leading UX teams should be in line with leading a complete project team. If it is the lead a UX team for the greatest design, it needs to be in sync with the leadership of a successful project (which UX is only a part of). Different strategies are not mutually exclusive – these are all important – and today’s focus is on one strategy that we believe is required for any of the other strategies to work: the UX team must have their act together and must perform at a high level in order to be effective, be taken seriously, and lead. ** UX performing at a high-level is to deliver great design in the context of delivering great projects (with all related constraints). UX as a science will not be conscious of the applicable constraints. UX as an engineering discipline will take into account economic considerations that will affect the design delivery. ** consider creating a slide for this point **
  • Facilitated partnerships. Killian Evers. Senior Manager of Program Management in User Experience & Design and Product Planning for PayPal.It is accepted in the HCI research community that incorporating human-centered design into a structured approach to developing software is important. However, incorporating human-centered design into an established system development lifecycle is fraught with challenges: process integration; prejudices and organizational politics; resource constraints; and the desire for continual process improvement to ensure optimal performance [4]. A few organizations have discovered an unlikely solution to resolve these obstacles, in the form of UX program managers. Program managers are tasked to think beyond the UX organization to create essential partnerships with other parts of the larger organization that can help drive UX organizations to premiere positions within corporations.Investing in a highly visible success. Find a highly visible project that has a lot of potential for ROI, focus lots of resources on it, and evangelize the hell out of it. Deliver Results quickly. Laurie Pattison. Senior Director of User Experience at Oracle.You only get one chance to make a first impression. Convincing others where you work of the value of UX is no different. Unless you're part of that rare breed whose past experience is so vast and consistently successful, you have a very short time – usually no more than one calendar quarter -- to deliver spectacular results. Whether you're new to an organization, or just newly assigned to a project, you need to adopt some of the strategies and habits required to demonstrate results quickly.Day-to-day effectiveness and execution of UX personnel. Craig Peters. None of the other strategies will matter <reveal first yellow highlight> This last one used to be our main focus of a UX Lead program, but we realize now that it needs to be focused both externally and internally, which is what Killian was talking about here <reveal second yellow highlight>--- --- ---UX Leadership should be put in the context of project leadership. Again, leading UX teams should be in line with leading a complete project team. If it is the lead a UX team for the greatest design, it needs to be in sync with the leadership of a successful project (which UX is only a part of). Different strategies are not mutually exclusive – these are all important – and today’s focus is on one strategy that we believe is required for any of the other strategies to work: the UX team must have their act together and must perform at a high level in order to be effective, be taken seriously, and lead. ** UX performing at a high-level is to deliver great design in the context of delivering great projects (with all related constraints). UX as a science will not be conscious of the applicable constraints. UX as an engineering discipline will take into account economic considerations that will affect the design delivery. ** consider creating a slide for this point **
  • So far, we’ve focused on UX designers and what it’s like for them. Besides UX Designer, what are some other roles who are involved in a product development project?Take responses from the audience and write them on a flip chart paper. (Product manager, engineer, project manager, marketer, legal and compliance officer, QA, project sponsor, etc.)
  • Choose one of the roles from the paper and write it on the top of the note card ((or a section of the notes in our book))You’ll then jot down a definition of success for that person’s role. For example, what makes a Project Manager successful? (60 sec)<Take a few responses from the entire room> Those roles do not think about wireframes, the difference between task analysis and task modeling, Fitts Law, site maps, Omnigraffle, the latest clipping mask feature in CS6, the difference between content audit and a content assessment. No, they’re thinking of project schedules, functional specifications documents, integration of platforms, revenue goals…((the point here is to get them to see that everyone else on the team is thinking about things that are not UX!))
  • Continued from transition: As soon as I asked how that felt, one of the more respected and accomplished Sr. Interaction Designers raised his hand and said <reveal quote>.
  • Continued from transition: As soon as I asked how that felt, one of the more respected and accomplished Sr. Interaction Designers raised his hand and said <reveal quote>.
  • We start with this because it helps us get in the shoes of our UX peeps and everyone else on the project. We’re getting inside their heads.
  • You know what would be really fun? Insert a video of Clubber Lange saying “pain”. The second half of this: http://youtu.be/DJnKm6ftPu0
  • Materials: pre-cut strips of paper
  • Your
  • Your
  • ACTIVITYCreate a list of the different things that go on in a project that the UX team could make a one sheeter from.
  • The main goal of Discovery is to understand what needs to be done. What’s working? What’s not working? What’s wanted? What’s needed?Change is usually difficult for people. Another goal of Discovery is to generate buy-in and ownership. It also sets the stage for piloting and field testing the solutions.
  • Basically, you want to interview anyone that has anything to do with the UX team members and vice versa. Not just those who interact with the UX team, but also those that interact with deliverables and artifacts. For example, in some cases, the engineering team might not interact much with the designers. Or the BA’s might add wireframes to a functional spec document, but the designers don’t interact with them very often. You’d be surprised at what you might hear from them.
  • UX team members and their managers; those who are on the ground doing the work, interacting with the rest of the organization: Information Architects, Interaction Designers, User Researchers, Content Strategists, UI Developers, Managers, Project Managers, Producers, etc.Those who work with the UX team. Business Units, Business Analysts, Product Managers, Project Managers, Engineers, Marketing, etc. PMs & Product Managers need to be interviewed since they possess knowledge about the project’s constraints and the full view of the business requirements / needs / constraints.
  • UX team members and their managers; those who are on the ground doing the work, interacting with the rest of the organization: Information Architects, Interaction Designers, User Researchers, Content Strategists, UI Developers, Managers, Project Managers, Producers, etc.Those who work with the UX team. Business Units, Business Analysts, Product Managers, Project Managers, Engineers, Marketing, etc. PMs & Product Managers need to be interviewed since they possess knowledge about the project’s constraints and the full view of the business requirements / needs / constraints.
  • Basically, you want to interview anyone that has anything to do with the UX team members and vice versa. Not just those who interact with the UX team, but also those that interact with deliverables and artifacts. For example, in some cases, the engineering team might not interact much with the designers. Or the BA’s might add wireframes to a functional spec document, but the designers don’t interact with them very often. You’d be surprised at what you might hear from them.
  • Basically, you want to interview anyone that has anything to do with the UX team members and vice versa. Not just those who interact with the UX team, but also those that interact with deliverables and artifacts. For example, in some cases, the engineering team might not interact much with the designers. Or the BA’s might add wireframes to a functional spec document, but the designers don’t interact with them very often. You’d be surprised at what you might hear from them.
  • Engagement. From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Participation.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership.Difficult public exchanges. Surface problems, reservations, issues early and with integrity. Avoiding them will cost you big in the long run. Real Choice.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Don’t package it all up. Don’t focus on perfection; commitment is more important.New Conversations. Minimize blame, personal preference, history, and politics. Focus on purpose and meaning, business goals, user goals, UCD best practices, and what’s going to be special about the future.Deliberate environment and meetings. Pay attention to where you meet. Prep. Practice. Set up equipment. Prepare the walls. Take a workshop on running meetings. See Kevin Hoffman on running meetings. Flawless Consulting, p 44-5
  • Basically, you want to interview anyone that has anything to do with the UX team members and vice versa. Not just those who interact with the UX team, but also those that interact with deliverables and artifacts. For example, in some cases, the engineering team might not interact much with the designers. Or the BA’s might add wireframes to a functional spec document, but the designers don’t interact with them very often. You’d be surprised at what you might hear from them.
  • Engagement. From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Participation.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership.Difficult public exchanges. Surface problems, reservations, issues early and with integrity. Avoiding them will cost you big in the long run. Real Choice.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Don’t package it all up. Don’t focus on perfection. Commitment is more important New Conversations. Minimize blame, personal preference, history, and politics. Focus on purpose and meaning, business goals, user goals, UCD best practices, and what’s going to be special about the future.Deliberate environment and meetings. Pay attention to where you meet. Prep. Practice. Set up equipment. Prepare the walls. Take a workshop on running meetings.Flawless Consulting, p 44-5
  • Engagement. From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Participation.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership.Difficult public exchanges. Surface problems, reservations, issues early and with integrity. Avoiding them will cost you big in the long run. Real Choice.From the beginning. We want buy in and ownership. Don’t package it all up. Don’t focus on perfection. Commitment is more important New Conversations. Minimize blame, personal preference, history, and politics. Focus on purpose and meaning, business goals, user goals, UCD best practices, and what’s going to be special about the future.Deliberate environment and meetings. Pay attention to where you meet. Prep. Practice. Set up equipment. Prepare the walls. Take a workshop on running meetings.Flawless Consulting, p 44-5
  • Your
  • Your
  • Your
  • Your
  • Your
  • Your
  • Every organization is different. Some have well-established process, templates, pattern libraries, onboarding experiences.What’s often missing is the soft skills, consulting skills, leadership skills.
  • Developing a ux lead program

    1. 1. Developing a UX Lead ProgramEnable a successful user experience fromideation to deployment
    2. 2. Before we get started, let’s welcomea new team member 2
    3. 3. How‟s that feel? We call this the Noise & Confusion problem.It‟s rampant even amongsenior, experienced people. 3
    4. 4. What we hear in our trainings… “I‟ve been here for five years, andSr. Interaction Designer I‟ve felt that wayIn-house (F100) the whole time.”Seasoned, well respected 4
    5. 5. What we tell them…It makes perfectly good sense to be confused. This is a massiveorganization with years of history. Groups organize and re-organize.There are different processes. Different legacy systems. Differentpeople. The list goes on and on.Remember• You‟re not alone (or dumb, or lazy, or…)• Don‟t try to understand it all - just the important stuff• The UX Lead program (with a guide, checklists, materials, and trainings) will help you figure out what‟s important 5
    6. 6. WHAT IS A UX LEADPROGRAM? 6
    7. 7. What exactly is a UX Lead Program?A set of tools, expectations and waysof being (for key UX team membersto serve as “Leads” on projects). 7
    8. 8. In their own words: What is a UX Lead Program? “It‟s what I do anyway; it‟s just a process to work with partners and manage your co-workers and your contributors.” “Before, it wasn‟t always clear who would do what. Now it‟s clear.” “Having a Lead frees up people‟s energy and time to come up with tactical solutions.” 8
    9. 9. TODAY’S AGENDA 9
    10. 10. What we’ll cover today•Definition, pain points, context•Components•Process of making it happen•Nuts & bolts, questions 10
    11. 11. Our intention is for this to beactionable, not theoretical.We‟ll provide time throughout the dayto reflect and help each other figure outhow this might work in your real life. 11
    12. 12. First, let’s see who’s in the room. 12
    13. 13. INTRODUCTIONS 13
    14. 14. • Richard hearts complexity • It‟s all about successful delivery • PMI, CSDP • Adaptability, FlexibilityRichard Charette • EquisoftProgram / Project Manager • Software engineering backgroundDelivery Manager • Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch)Producer of Canada 14
    15. 15. • Craig hearts complexity • Awasu Design • Bolt | Peters User Experience (now fb) • Time for a new era of consultanciesCraig Peters • CHI „09 Panel (Figuring out the “OneCEO Thing” that will Move UX into a Position ofAdvocate / Coach / Mentor Strategic Relevance) • IA Summit „09 workshop (Strategies for Enabling UX to Play a More Strategic Role: What Will Work Where You Work?) • CHI ‟11 workshop (Leading Innovation Workshops) • Sociology & Education Background 15
    16. 16. Let‟s take a step back. What does UX Leadership mean?What is UX Leadership relative tothe rest of the organization? 16
    17. 17. CONTEXT 17
    18. 18. Product development has beenaround for a while. While user experience is relatively new. 18
    19. 19. UX Leadership is about moreinfluence and strategic impact. People have been talking about this for a few years… 19
    20. 20. Louis Rosenfeld (2002 blog post)Evangelizing User Experience Design on Ten Dollars a Day•The ROI Case•Going to the videotape (of frustrated users)•Telling stories•Therapy•Consumer Sensitivity Boot Camp•Logs•Keeping up with the Jonseshttp://louisrosenfeld.com/home/bloug_archive/000131.html 20
    21. 21. 21
    22. 22. Five approaches• Document and evangelize UX work• Calculate ROI• Conduct ethnographic research• Determine best ownership of UX• Position UX strategically in the organization 22
    23. 23. The Business of Customer Experience:Lessons I Learned at Wells FargoSecil WatsonSVP, Channel StrategyWells Fargo 23
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. Four approaches • Facilitate partnerships • Invest in a highly visible success • Deliver results quickly • Improve the day-to-day effectiveness and execution of UX personnel 25
    26. 26. This is the heart of a UX Lead program • Facilitate partnerships • Improve the day-to-day effectiveness and execution of UX personnel 26
    27. 27. But wait… It‟s not just the UX‟ers who are confused.Who else is involved in a productdevelopment lifecycle? 27
    28. 28. NOISE & CONFUSION 2 28
    29. 29. Activity • Pick one of the roles listed on the wall and putWhat do non-UX‟ers yourself in their shoes.think about? • Write down what‟s top of(What‟s top of mind mind for them; their mainfor them as they do responsibilities. (60 sec)their jobs?) • We‟ll report out to the whole room. 29
    30. 30. “Tell me again the difference between aProject Manager wireframe and a mockup.”(non-UX) 30
    31. 31. “What am I v looking at?”Sponsor(Line of Business) “Why does it cost this much?” 31
    32. 32. 32
    33. 33. 33
    34. 34. PAIN POINTS 34
    35. 35. 35
    36. 36. Activity • Think about pain pointsWhat‟s your pain? at your organization that could be addressed by a(Why did you decide better UX practice.to come to thistutorial?) • Use a marker and write one pain point per strip of paper. (2 min) • We‟ll put them on the wall. 36
    37. 37. Pain points we’ve observed•Inconsistent engagement•UX Mgrs doing too much•UX contributors overworked & overwhelmed•Project details slipping through the cracks•Product solutions not as good as they could be – not innovative enough•Business units look to outside agencies for the “creative” or “innovative” projects 37
    38. 38. Pain points we’ve observed•UX team members not equipped with the language of the business and project management, therefore can‟t advocate and lead as effectively•Other groups have difficulty translating UX into traditional project management process•Difficulty estimating UX scope on projects 38
    39. 39. UCD STEPS 40
    40. 40. Sample User Centered Design ProcessUnfortunately, our business partners are not experts in user centered design. I’m still not sure what UX is doing. Something about a task flow… wireframes…? Why are we doing this activity? Am I supposed to be doing something? Business Partner 41
    41. 41. 42
    42. 42. Foundational Pieces of UX Lead Program•(User Centered Design Toolkit)•UX Brief•One Sheeters•UX Lead Guide / manual / online resource•Training•Continuation Systems 43
    43. 43. Foundational Pieces of UX Lead Program UCD Toolkit UX Brief One- Sheeters Training Continuation Systems UX Lead Guide 44
    44. 44. UX Brief One- Sheeters 45
    45. 45. UX Brief – Starting a Project Right The old way (risky business)We‟ve got this project that needs design support. Are you available? Yes, we‟re here to help. Tell us when and where the meetings are and we‟ll be there. Business UX’er Partner 46
    46. 46. UX Brief – Starting a Project Right The new way (as UX Lead)We‟ve got this project that needs design support. Are you available? How can we respond? (role play) Business UX Lead Partner 47
    47. 47. UX Brief – Starting a Project Right What did we just hear? Why do we care? Benefits? Concerns? 48
    48. 48. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightProject OverviewHi there, I‟ve read through the resource request form and theattached background PPT. I also talked this over with somefolks here in UX. I understand you want to improve the socialsharing experience because customers don‟t seem to be awareof them - or at least they‟re not aware of the benefits. UX Lead 49
    49. 49. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightApproach/High-Level UCD PlanHere‟s how we can help. First, we‟ll need to understand thecustomer more. To do that, we‟ll interview you and other keystakeholders, then we‟ll dig into the background research,creating a “Social Sharing Landscape” document that capturesour understanding.Next, we‟ll also model the experience to get in the customer‟shead more. We‟ll be working with you and your team UX Leadthroughout. 50
    50. 50. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightApproach/High-Level UCD Plan (continued)At this point we‟ll have a defined strategy for the design andcontent decisions. This is where the fun part begins: designingtask flows and wireframes; writing content; developing aprototype and seeing how it works with real users. You and yourteam will be part of each stage. Most people find it an enjoyableprocess to be a part of. UX Lead 51
    51. 51. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightResourcesI‟ll be serving as the Interaction Designer on the project andalso the Lead on the project. We‟ll also have a contentstrategist, a visual designer, a front-end developer for theprototyping stage, and a user researcher who will manage theusability testing portion. UX Lead 52
    52. 52. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightAssumptions & RisksOne more thing, it‟s really important that this is a collaborativeeffort and to that point, there are a number of activities andsteps that will require your team to work with us. So, they‟llhave to make time in their calendars for this to work. Otherwisewe risk not having the benefit of all your knowledge, could endup spinning our wheels, not having buy in when it comes time toapprove designs, etc. UX LeadAlso, we noticed that voice recognition was mentioned in one ofyour background documents. From what we saw in the projectrequest form, we‟re assuming that full integration of voicerecognition out of scope for this project. Is that correct? 53
    53. 53. UX Brief – Starting a Project RightTable of Contents for a Brief•Project Overview•Project Approach•High-Level Plan•Resources•Assumptions & Risks 54
    54. 54. Preparing the Brief for a very simple projectManager forwards RequestResource Request Form UX lead recaps the call over emailUX Lead checks Thanks for the phone call today. Just to recap, Straightforward, right? we‟re changing the copy of [that one page].with Manager tomake sure she‟snot missing I‟m going to change that one thing to the way wesomething talked on the phone. I‟ll be doing the majority of the work, with John chiming in for a quick review. UX Lead UX Manager We should have something for you on Friday. I understand that you‟ve already checked withUX Lead calls [key stakeholder] and got their blessing. Hi HiPartner Thank you for double-checking if Jane‟s team feels that this impacts them. If you hear anything about that, please let me know. UX Lead Partner Talk to you soon,UX Lead clarifies Your UX Lead ?? ~~things with Partner UX Lead Partner 55
    55. 55. Preparing the Brief for larger projectsManager talks to partner Partner sends PPT Mgr asks for resource request Manager looks it over PPT Request Form UX Manager Partner UX Manager PartnerManager assigns UX Lead Lead looks it over Lead meets Partner Checks with other UXers Hi Hi PPT Request Form UX Manager UX Lead UX Lead PartnerClarifies with Partner Checks w/ research group Checks in with Partner Checks previous Briefs ? ~ ~ ~ Brief BriefUX Lead Partner UX Lead Research UX Lead PartnerTalks to Mgr Re: exec Checks in with Checks w/ UX Producer Iterates Brief w/ Partnerreview Partner ~ ~ Brief UX Lead UX Manager UX Lead Partner UX Lead Producer UX Lead Partner 56
    56. 56. UX Brief as email UX Brief as documentThanks for the phone call today. Just torecap, we‟re changing the copy of [that onepage].I‟m going to change that one thing to theway we talked on the phone. I‟ll be doing themajority of the work, with John chiming in fora quick review. We should have somethingfor you on Friday.I understand that you‟ve already checkedwith [key stakeholder] and got their blessing.Thank you for double checking if Jane‟steam feels that this impacts them. If youhear anything about that, please let meknow.Talk to you soon,Your UX Lead• Project Overview• UX Approach• High-Level Plan• Resources• Assumptions & Risks 57
    57. 57. I got the UX Brief, but I‟m still not sure what a site map is.Why are we doing this activity? What do I do at UX this stage? Brief Business Partner 58
    58. 58. ONE-SHEETERS 59
    59. 59. One-SheetersPut simply, the One-Sheeters are one-pagerepresentations of a UCD activity or tool. Theyanswer the questions who, what, where, when,why, and how. 60
    60. 60. THE PLANNING STAGE 61
    61. 61. Most UCD Processes involve these stages The UX Lead program adds a deliberate stage to set the project up for success. This is where the UX Lead works on the UX Brief.This stage can go by many names:• Planning stage • Project set up • Understand the project • Prep 62
    62. 62. Stage 0 – Project Set Up UX Brief One- … Sheeters … The UX Brief marks the end of this stage 63
    63. 63. UX STRATEGY 64
    64. 64. What it Means to be a Consultative Partner The old way (a few weeks into the project) Define Key Scenarios Complete a Content Analyze Data Inventory Design Wireframes and page flows Attend Kickoff Conduct Whew, we‟ve Competitive Analysis been busy. UX’ers 65
    65. 65. What it Means to be a Consultative Partner The old way (it might go smoothly)Here are the wireframes, Overall, I like it a lot.page flows, and a start on I‟ve just got a couple the copy. What do you questions… think? Great, let‟s do it. UX’ers Business • Wireframes Partner • Research • Page Flow 66
    66. 66. What it Means to be a Consultative Partner The old way (it might not go so well) Hmmm. I don‟t know... Here are the Why don‟t we do it like this. wireframes, page flows, and a start on the copy. What do you think? UX’ers Business Partner I used to work here and it was good. 67
    67. 67. So, what went wrong? The business partners But they still weren‟t on the received a Brief and same page when the designs One Sheeters at the were presented. end of the planning stage. A common problem is that the UX team went through the Discovery Phase without getting alignment from the project team. This is where the UX Strategy comes into play. 68
    68. 68. 69
    69. 69. UX GUIDE 70
    70. 70. The guide covers:UX Lead • Company historyGuide • How the organization is structured • Groups throughout the organization • Roles throughout the organization • Processes and how UX processes fit in • Types of projects • Deep dive into the UX team structure and roles • What the UX Lead role is • Techniques for effective consulting • UX stages of engagements • Description of UCD activities & Lead considerations • Checklists • Anything else that‟s useful to your UX Leads 71
    71. 71. CHECKLISTS 72
    72. 72. Everyone loves checklistsYou will have to decide which tasks andprocesses make sense to structure with achecklist. What follows are someexamples. 73
    73. 73. Example checklists:UX LeadGuide • Receive Assignment • Create Relationships • Question, Listen, & Learn •Iterate UX Brief w/ UX Producer & Business Partner 74
    74. 74. TRAINING 75
    75. 75. Considerations for Training• Who to train• When to train• Trainings as co-creation of the program (participation versus presentation)• Re-training• Training the trainers 76
    76. 76. STAGES FOR DEVELOPINGA UX LEAD PROGRAM 78
    77. 77. Remember, every situation isdifferent. Some of these stages will apply to you…and some of them won‟t. The keyis to focus on the goal and spirit ofthe stages. 79
    78. 78. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 80
    79. 79. Discovery StageMain goal• Understand what needs to be done. What‟s working? Not working? What‟s wanted?Additional goals• Generate buy-in and ownership.• Set the stage for piloting and field testing. 81
    80. 80. Discovery Stage•Identify key people to involve•Gather and analyze data•Conduct interviews 82
    81. 81. Discovery StageA big part of the discovery phaseinvolves interviews. As many people as possible. One-on-one and group.Let them know their inputshapes the solution. Include people inside and outside the UX group.(See the appendix for interview reminders) 83
    82. 82. Who We’ve InterviewedWithin the UX team Beyond the UX team• Individual Contributors and • Business Analysts Managers • Product Managers• UX/UI/IA Designers • Project / Program Managers• Visual Designers • Engineers• Front-end Developers • Marketing• Delivery Managers • Legal & Compliance• Content Strategists • Business Unit Project Sponsors• User Researchers 84
    83. 83. Activity • Write down the peopleWho to interview? who would be most appropriate to involve at(In your situation, your organization.who are the keypeople to interview • We‟ll report out to thein discovery?) room. 85
    84. 84. What We’ve Learned• In most cases, the UX team members are professional, well meaning, conscientious, and hard working.• Solutions need to make their job easier, not harder. Simple, logistical solutions like checklists and templates are good.• They‟re weary of additional procedures / bureaucracy. 86
    85. 85. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 87
    86. 86. PlanIt‟s only after discovery that you canreally know what the solution can be. Work with stakeholders and implementers to create the plan and scope.Remind key people that all plans changeas you learn more. A plan is a startingpoint. 88
    87. 87. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 89
    88. 88. CreateCreate simple solutions with key people. Remember to keep the solutions simple. You don‟t want to add extra work or bureaucracy. 90
    89. 89. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 91
    90. 90. IterateTest out materials with a couple keypeople both in and outside the UX team. Gather feedback from UX people and also from those outside of the UX team.Iterate and then expand (nail it beforeyou scale it). 92
    91. 91. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 93
    92. 92. LaunchIf you‟ve incrementally piloted and iterated, the“launch” will be less disruptive. Launch often involves a training where you introduce the pieces.Involve others as much as possible in the launch(those who have piloted, for example). Assign ownership before the launch as much as possible. 94
    93. 93. Stages to Developing a UX Lead Program1. Discover (assess & understand the problem)2. Plan (refine problem statement and scope)3. Create (processes, materials, programs)4. Iterate (pilot, field test, improve)5. Launch (roll out solutions, assign ownership)6. Improve (assess, adjust, and iterate) 95
    94. 94. ImprovePosition the “launch” as just astarting point. Assign a program manager.Plan for managers to work with teammembers on the new program. Actively solicit feedback and offer support. 96
    95. 95. CONTINUATION SYSTEMS 97
    96. 96. Keeping the Program Going• Communicate outwardly as road show or organic• Managers working with direct reports during roll out• Program manager for the UX Lead program• Assigning ownership to individual pieces• Pivoting• Solicit feedback in many ways (one-on-one, surveys, etc.) 98
    97. 97. WHO SHOULD BE A LEAD? 100
    98. 98. This question must be answered by eachorganization. Some organizations havedesigners serve dual purpose on aproject: lead and design. Others designatea particular role as a Lead. That personmight not do any design. 101
    99. 99. UX Producer (Delivery Manager)Many organizations have a role in the User Experienceteam that focuses on managing the successful delivery ofthe UX engagement. Sometimes this person is called a UXProducer, Delivery Manager, or Project Manager. 102
    100. 100. Activity • What would work best forWhat would work your organization:best at your – A team member thatorganization? serves as Lead on a project-by-project basis? – A dedicated Lead role? – UX Producer? – Some other arrangement? • We‟ll report out to the room. 103
    101. 101. WAYS OF BEING 104
    102. 102. UX Lead as Facilitator & EducatorUX personnel juggle many The UX Lead facilitatesmoving parts: collaboration between different people:• Business goals The UX Lead also educates the• Many different people project team about each individual• Technical limitations design activity, deliverable, and• Design best practices process.• Product development processes• Research results The UX Lead program materials –• Accessibility guidelines Guide, Training, etc. – should• Legal and compliance reviews explicitly address and develop these• And so on… skills among the Leads. 105
    103. 103. UX Lead as Facilitator & EducatorTypical Technical Skills for UX: Facilitation & Educational Skills:• Persona development • Set context for UX process• Information architecture • Negotiate tradeoffs• User research • Explain value of UCD• Interaction design • Involve partners in design decisions• Visual design • Explain how to give feedback• Prototyping • And so on…• Competitive analysis• And so on… 106
    104. 104. Don‟t underestimate how foreign userexperience activities are to people outsidethe UX team. 107
    105. 105. Consulting SkillsPeter Block‟s work is instructive for UX Leads. We‟ll coverthree concepts here:• Authenticity• Contracting• Attending to each stageFor more, see Peter Block‟s book, Flawless Consulting. 108
    106. 106. Ways of Engaging• Engagement instead of mandate or persuasion• Participation instead of presentation• Difficult public exchanges• Real choice• New conversations for new culture• Deliberate environment and meetingsFor more, see Peter Block‟s book, Flawless Consulting. 109
    107. 107. Leading Internally and ExternallyWithin the UX team Beyond the UX team• Motivate the team • Build relationships• Collaborate w/ UX Producer • Understand business needs• Represent UX vision • Attend to concerns• Problem solve challenges • Educate• Introduce new UX members • Advocate for designs• Oversee quality of deliverables • Negotiate tradeoffs• Determine need for reviews 110
    108. 108. One final takeaway:Commitment is more importantthan perfection 111
    109. 109. Remaining Questions?Craig Peterscraig@awasudesign.com@craigpetersRichard Charetterichard.charette@awasudesign.com 112
    110. 110. APPENDIX 113
    111. 111. What internal consultants want from their boss• A clear definition of the job before I am sent out on a project• Access to the boss• Assistance on the nontechnical and political elements of the project• Don‟t overcommit me all the time• Freedom to negotiate contracts based on the particulars of the situation• Minimum bias on how the project should turn out, what the recommendations should look likeFor more, see Peter Block’s book, Flawless Consulting. 114
    112. 112. What internal consultants want from their clients• A clear definition of the job• Access to the person who really represents the client organization, also access to data• Work the problem together – cooperation• Commitment to the project• Share the blame and glory• To be wanted (to feel useful)• No bias about the outcome• Take care of physical needs to accomplish the job• Openness and feedback• Feedback on what happened after I leftFor more, see Peter Block’s book, Flawless Consulting. 115
    113. 113. Reminders for your interviewsYour roleYou might already have a relationship with them. Tell themthat for this engagement, you‟re just a researcher. You‟renot evaluating their performance in any way. 116
    114. 114. Reminders for your interviewsPrior knowledge of the effortIf you‟re embarking on a UX Lead effort, it‟s likely they willhave heard about it. Have them explain what they know ofthe effort. This warms them up to talking, surfacesmisperceptions, and generates ownership. Ask them whatthe goals of the effort are and should be. 117
    115. 115. Reminders for your interviewsHow projects happen todayYou‟re looking for their understanding of the nuts and boltsof how projects are assigned, handled, staffed, carried out,etc. Have them describe how they get assigned to projects.Who else is typically on a project? When is UX involved?How are those decisions made? Etc. 118
    116. 116. Reminders for your interviewsUncovering what is and isn’t workingYou can ask directly: What’s working? What’s not working?What would make your job easier? What parts of the jobare your least favorite?Also ask indirectly. What was your favorite project? Yourleast favorite? Why? Go into the details of those projects. 119
    117. 117. Reminders for your interviewsOther modelsOftentimes people‟s vision narrows when they work in oneenvironment. This is to open up their thinking.Have you worked other places in a similar role? Did thosecompanies have set practices that you followed? How didthat work for you? What worked well? Not well? 120
    118. 118. Reminders for your interviewsFuture look-backThis helps reveal what‟s truly important to them.Imagine looking back on this effort a few months from now.Hypothetically, how might you finish these statements:I’m so glad we did this, because now ___.This didn’t work out so well, because ___. 121
    119. 119. Other Pieces of UX Teams• User Centered Design toolkit• Project request process• Design patterns• UCD process• Onboarding• UX “Producing” (UX Project Managing)• UX Scorecard 122
    120. 120. THANK YOU!Craig Peterscraig@awasudesign.com@craigpetersRichard Charetterichard.charette@awasudesign.com 123
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