Yoga For Cyclists

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Learn what muscle imbalances commonly afflict cyclists, and how to treat them with Yoga.

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Yoga For Cyclists

  1. 1. Men are born soft and supple: dead, they are stiff and hard. Plants are born tender and pliant: dead, they are brittle and dry. Thus whoever is stiff and inflexible is a disciple of death. Whoever is soft and yielding is a disciple of life. -Lao Tsu Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  2. 2. Cycling creates predictable muscle imbalances. Muscles that are chronically stretched become weak in neutral positions. Muscles that are chronically shortened become tight in neutral positions. Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  3. 3. Cycling is not a postural break…… Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  4. 4. This posture is associated with two well known “syndromes”, upper and lower cross. These are described in detail in remaining slides. Yoga for Cyclists targets these muscular imbalances, bringing greater harmony, balance, ease, endurance, and strength to the cyclist’s body, and by extension, to the mind. Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  5. 5. UPPER CROSS Postural findings: Rounded shoulders Anterior head carriage C0-C1 hyperextension Elevation of shoulders Winging of scapulae -McCaffery’s notes  Pectorals  Lower and middle traps  Suboccipitals  Rhomboids  Upper trap/levator  Serratus anterior scapulae  Deep neck flexors Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  6. 6. “The combined result of this posture is that the cervico- cranial, cervicothoracic, glenohumeral, and tempero- mandibular joints are all overstressed. Joint dys- function and trigger points naturally result from these muscle imbalances, associated with headache, neck pain, shoulder blade pain, and TMJ and shoulder disorders” (Liebenson). Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  7. 7. During normal neck flexion the chin will travel in a smooth arc to the chest, and will come to rest either touching the chest or no more than two fingers away from the chest. This motion can only occur if the deep neck flexors and the SCMs are working together properly. If the SCM is overactive and the deep flexors are weak or inhibited, the SCM’s action will cause the chin to poke, as picture in the dotted outline above. The most crucial period to watch for this pattern is in the first 5 degrees of movement (Hammer). After the initial 5 degrees the patient may correct him/herself. If the chin cannot reach a position of no more than two fingerwidths from the chest the suboccipitals may be tight (travel). Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  8. 8. Shoulder Abduction Push up test Shoulder elevation beginning before 60 Scapular winging occuring during floor or degrees indicates muscle imbalance wall push ups indicates a weak/inhibited (overactive upper trapezius and/or levator serratus anterior. Observe both sides for scapula, inhibited mid and lower symmetry as the descrepency is often more trapezius). suddle than pictured below. Normal shoulder abduction Scapular winging during wall push-up Shoulder hike do to overactive upper trapezius Craig Roberts, DC -Hoppenfeld WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  9. 9.  Respiration may often be affected by upper cross syndrome  Rounding of the shoulders and increased thoracic kyphosis (upper back rounding) lead to decreased lateral excursion of the rib cage (think of the ribs moving up and down like a bucket-handle—poor posture impedes the bucket-handle movement).  Compression at the sternoclavicular joint reflexively increases respiratory rate (MPI)  Look for:  Paradoxical breathing (“chest breathing”)  Trigger points in scalenes (accessory muscles of respiration) Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  10. 10. Facilitate Facilitate d eep Facilitate serratu s S tretch p ecto ral S tretch rh o m b o id s, lo w er n eck flex o rs an terio r m u scles su b o ccip ital P o se an d m id trap m u scles T ad asan a (stan d in g p o se) X X X S alab h asan a (lo cu st) X X C h atu ran g a D an d asan a X X N ak rasan a X X D h an u rasan a (b o w p o se) X X X S arv an g asan a (sh o u ld er stan d ) X T rik o n asan a (trian g le p o se) X X X P u rv o ttan asan a (in clin ed p lan e) X X X Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  11. 11. Facilitate Facilitate deep Stretch upper Stretch pectoral Stretch rhomboids, lower neck flexors trap/levator muscles suboccipital Pose and mid trap muscles X X X Parvatasana (mountain pose) X Ustrasana (camel pose) X X X Setu Bandhasana (bridge pose) X X Adho Mukha Svanasanaa Sasamgasana (Hare pose in 2 phases) X X Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  12. 12. F acilitate F acilitate d e ep S tretc h u p p e r S tretc h p ecto ra l S tretc h rh o m b o id s , lo w e r n eck flex o rs trap /lev ato r m u scles su b o ccip ital P o se an d m id trap m u scles V irab h ad ras an a I X X X V irab h ad ras an a II X X X Whenever possible make certain the the mid and lower traps are active, the shoulders are externally rotated and depressed, and that the deep neck flexors are active tucking the chin and keeping the ears in a plumb line with the center of the shoulders. A mirror or an instructor is extremely helpful in the beginning. Be especially conscious of the above directions when performing tadasana, vajrasana, and salabhasana. As you enter each pose first mentally check your body position, then make certain that you are breathing slowly and with the diaphragm. Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  13. 13. …………………………Warrior sequence to one side, then the other…………………………… …………One side, then other……….…. Quadraped track ……………..Several Arms may be straight Arms in overhead “V” Times………………. W-exercise Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  14. 14. LOWER CROSS Postural findings: Lumbar hyperlordosis Anterior pelvic tilt Protruding abdomen Foot flare Hypertrophy of thoraco-lumbar junction Groove in iliotibial band -Liebenson  Hip flexors  Gluteus maximus  Lumbar erector spinae  Gluteus medius  Tensor fascia latae  Quadratus lumborum  Abdominals  Piriformis Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  15. 15.  “The combined result of this posture is that the lumbosacral, thoracolumbar, SI, hip, and knee joints are all over-stressed. Joint dysfunction and trigger points naturally result from these muscle imbalances, accompanied by low back pain, buttock pain, pseudo- sciatica, and knee disorders.” -Liebenson -McCaffery’s notes Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  16. 16. Leg extension The prone patient is instructed to slowly lift one leg while the evaluator uses one hand to monitor the activity of the gluteal muscles and the hamstrings of the leg being raised, and the other hand to monitor the lumbar erectors bilaterally. The correct sequence is listed at left. -Hammer Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  17. 17. Hip Abduction Leg should rise in-plane with the body Leg and foot should maintain neutral rotation Tight piriformis causing external rotation of foot. Tight QL causing hip-hike Tight TFL or hip flexors causing thigh flexion Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  18. 18. Hatha Yoga for lower cross Pose Facilitate Facilitate Facilitate Stretch Stretch Stretch hip Stretch TFL glut max glut med abdominals piriformis lumbar flexors erectors Sasamgasana X Jathara Parivertanasana X Ardha-Matsyen- drasana X X Rajakopatasana (pigeon pose) X X Purvottanasana X X Ardha- Salabhasana X Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  19. 19. Hatha Yoga for lower cross Pose Facilitate Facilitate Facilitate Stretch Stretch Stretch hip Stretch TFL glut max glut med abdominals piriformis lumbar flexors erectors/QL Padhastasana X Paschimot- anasana X Trikonasana X Vashistasana I (side plank) X X Ardha Chandrasana X Virabhadrasana III X Janushirasana Craig Roberts, DC X WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  20. 20. Hatha Yoga for lower cross Pose Facilitate Facilitate Facilitate Stretch Stretch Stretch hip Stretch TFL glut max glut med abdominals piriformis lumbar flexors erectors/QL Sarvangasana X Lunge stretch (surya X namaskar) Navasana (w post tilt) X X Supta Vajrasana X Side-lying TFL X (in class) On back one knee bent X X (in class) Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  21. 21. Hatha Yoga for lower cross Pose Facilitate Facilitate Facilitate Stretch Stretch Stretch hip Stretch TFL glut max glut med abdominals piriformis lumbar flexors erectors/QL Tadasana with neutral X pelvis Savasana with neutral X pelvis Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM
  22. 22. Craig Roberts, DC WWW.DOCROBERTS.COM

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