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A Workforce Investment Act Primer: What It’s About Where We’ve Been Where We Are
Purpose of Session <ul><li>WIA Basics:  Background, History, Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>How It Works: Infrastructure, Regul...
History – skill building is not new
WIA Predecessors <ul><li>Federal Control </li></ul><ul><li>Serve Job Seekers Only </li></ul><ul><li>Social Service Intent ...
Purpose of WIA <ul><li>Enhance National Productivity & Competitivenes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing Occupational Skill ...
WIA Title 1 Funding Structure DOLETA Distributes to State Agencies
Workforce Board Composition <ul><li>Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEOs) appoint Local Board Members </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
Board Responsibilities <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Contract for Operations & Service Providers </li></ul><ul><li>Ov...
How It Works <ul><li>Boards Directly: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid Duplicat...
How It Works <ul><li>Boards Contract for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One Stop Operators? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth provi...
One Stop Service System <ul><li>Programs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WIA Title 1:  Adult, Youth and Dislocated Workers </li></u...
One Stop Service System <ul><li>Must have one “full service” one-stop in each area </li></ul><ul><li>17 Mandated Partners ...
One Stop Service System:  Core Services <ul><li>Intake and Orientation  </li></ul><ul><li>Skill & Interest Assessment </li...
One Stop Service System: Intensive Services <ul><li>More comprehensive assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Individual career and...
One Stop Service System: Training <ul><li>Individual Training Accounts (tuition assistance for vocational / technical trai...
One Stop Service System: Youth Services <ul><li>Older Youth & Younger Youth </li></ul><ul><li>In School & Out Of School </...
One Stop Service System: Business Services (typical) <ul><li>Business Needs Must Be Addressed in Local Plan </li></ul><ul>...
Common Performance Measures <ul><li>Many partners affected </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Entry into unsubsidized employment </li...
What is Workforce Development System?
What is the Joint Work of the Workforce Development System? <ul><li>Three major processes in developing human capital </li...
Process Chart Youth Adults Re-train Educate preK-12 career info post-secondary education Prepare/Train internships dual en...
The WIB Roles?
NAWB – Current Thoughts on  Re-Auth <ul><li>Clear expectations & measures of success </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate & dependab...
Timing in 2011 <ul><li>When for Re-Authorization? </li></ul><ul><li>On the agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul><...
Collaboration… <ul><li>“ Politeness is the poison of collaboration” </li></ul><ul><li>  - Edwin Land </li></ul><ul><li> “ ...
<ul><li>THANK YOU </li></ul>Christine Quinn President South Central Michigan Works! 517-437-0990 [email_address]
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Wia Overview 101(Final)

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Understand the Workforce Investment Act?

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  • Land Grant - The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for the states to develop or sell to raise funds to establish and endow &amp;quot;land grant&amp;quot; colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of agriculture, science and engineering as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class rather than higher education&apos;s historic core of classical studies.[1] Prior to enactment of the Morrill Act in 1862, Michigan State University was chartered as a state land-grant institution on February 12, 1855, as the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, receiving an appropriation of 14,000 acres (57 km2) of state-owned land. The Farmers&apos; High School of Pennsylvania, later to become Pennsylvania State University, followed as a state land-grant school on February 22 of that year. Smith-Hughes National Vocational Education Act of 1917 was an act of the United States Congress that promoted vocational agriculture to train people &amp;quot;who have entered upon or who are preparing to enter upon the work of the farm,&amp;quot; and provided federal funds for this purpose. As such it is the basis both for the promotion of vocational education , and for its isolation from the rest of the curriculum in most school settings. New Deal – Unemployment Compensation, the Works Progress Administration (public sector employment), Civil Conservation Corps – unprecedented expansion of federal funding for job training CETA - The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (or CETA , Pub.L. 93-203) is a United States federal law enacted in 1973 to train workers and provide them with jobs in the public service. The program offered work to those with low incomes and the long term unemployed as well as summer jobs to low income high school students. Full time jobs were provided for a period of 12 to 24 months in public agencies or private not for profit organizations. The intent was to impart a marketable skill that would allow participants to move to an unsubsidized job. It was an extension of the Works Progress Administration program from the 1930s. The Act was intended to decentralize control of federally controlled job training programs, giving more power to the individual state governments JTPA - The law was enacted to establish federal assistance programs to prepare youth and unskilled adults for entry into the labor force and to provide job training to economically disadvantaged and other individuals facing serious barriers to employment. In order to carry out its purpose, the law authorized appropriations for fiscal year 1983 and for each succeeding fiscal year to carry out adult and youth programs , federally administered programs , summer youth employment and training programs , and employment and training assistance for dislocated workers . FUNCTIONS OF PRIVATE INDUSTRY COUNCIL: Sec. 103.(a) It shall be the responsibility of the private industry council to provide guidance for, and exercise oversight with respect to, activities under the job training plan for its service delivery area in partnership with the unit or units of general local government within its service delivery area.
  • The law seems to be clear that on youth, there is a presumption of contracting, but on Adults &amp; Dislocated workers there is the ability of the Board to have a substantial amount of services covered by the One-stop consortium. So the “?” here is how does the Board want to handle service delivery at the one-stop?
  • There are two roles that Boards play. On the one hand there is the “Legislative” role; what does the law tell me I must do and what decisions do I need to make in performing my mandate. The second role a WIB can play is that of “Leadership”. Leadership seems to inherently recognize that there is a workforce system and it is a complicated &amp; messy thing that encompasses far more than the mandates in the Workforce Investment Act. How can the WIB help provide vision to the community in workforce issues? How does the WIB “see” these other systems that impact workforce development and how does the WIB interact? Provide support where needed? And not just financial support from WIA. The Board, recognizing the critical role of other systems, and respecting the work of other orgs can provide legislative support at budget time, make certain that accomplishments of others are recognized by the WIB and work to convene the community discussions that provoke a vision and action to achieve a world-class workforce.
  • Identifying industry sectors that drive the local/regional economy and what is economic development investing in is step #1. Step #2 is to begin to examine how the workforce system responds to the human capitol needs of business - we create human capitol through these three (3) processes and so as we look at critical occupations we might want to know that the supply of labor to them is being taken care of - in a sense, in manf we look at the various processes in producing a part to determine if the part we are making “fits&amp;quot; long before final assembly. Same principle. This also helps WIBs decide if the skill they need can be “made” or if it needs “bought”. When Westinghouse decided to keep their nuclear power design &amp; maintenance in western PA, Three Rivers WIB helped locate the engineering talent they needed. Some of that could be found in the universities in the region, but some had to be “found”. In following through the processes current &amp; future needs could be met through planning and then working with all the players to meet the needs. (helping young people know about engineering &amp; that schools had STEM as a significant part of their curriculum plans – Pittsburgh’s City Schools new technology high school – and that all the issues surrounding the need are thought through.
  • WIBs are critical in the system and that means the appointments are critical Representatives of the “driver” industries are important WIBs could be the centerpiece of the industry sector initiatives in your region
  • Transcript of "Wia Overview 101(Final)"

    1. 1. A Workforce Investment Act Primer: What It’s About Where We’ve Been Where We Are
    2. 2. Purpose of Session <ul><li>WIA Basics: Background, History, Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>How It Works: Infrastructure, Regulations, Money </li></ul><ul><li>Intent </li></ul><ul><li>Current Issues and Challenges </li></ul>
    3. 3. History – skill building is not new
    4. 4. WIA Predecessors <ul><li>Federal Control </li></ul><ul><li>Serve Job Seekers Only </li></ul><ul><li>Social Service Intent - helping people </li></ul><ul><li>“ Silo” Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Boards Directly Provide Services </li></ul><ul><li>Services to Specific Target Groups </li></ul>
    5. 5. Purpose of WIA <ul><li>Enhance National Productivity & Competitivenes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing Occupational Skill Levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving Quality of Workforce </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Improve Lives of Workers by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing Employment, Retention and Earning of Participants </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. WIA Title 1 Funding Structure DOLETA Distributes to State Agencies
    7. 7. Workforce Board Composition <ul><li>Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEOs) appoint Local Board Members </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Reps (must be board majority) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Based Organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Labor Organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One Stop Partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Others As Determined Locally </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Board Responsibilities <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Contract for Operations & Service Providers </li></ul><ul><li>Oversight for operations & outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiate Performance Measures with Governor </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate Activities with Economic Development and Education / Training </li></ul>
    9. 9. How It Works <ul><li>Boards Directly: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid Duplication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiscal, Regulatory and Performance Compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local Strategy Development </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. How It Works <ul><li>Boards Contract for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One Stop Operators? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth providers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adult? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dislocated Worker Services? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Governor’s have the call on allowance of Boards to provide services </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. One Stop Service System <ul><li>Programs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WIA Title 1: Adult, Youth and Dislocated Workers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Eligibility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Service Provision </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tracking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting </li></ul></ul></ul>
    12. 12. One Stop Service System <ul><li>Must have one “full service” one-stop in each area </li></ul><ul><li>17 Mandated Partners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine Roles & Responsibility, level of collaboration, cost sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Core Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intensive Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training Services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. One Stop Service System: Core Services <ul><li>Intake and Orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Skill & Interest Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Access to job listings </li></ul><ul><li>Access to resume writing tools </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Market Information </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops (job seeking, resume writing, interviewing, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Info on Partners </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Room (computers, phones, etc.) </li></ul>
    14. 14. One Stop Service System: Intensive Services <ul><li>More comprehensive assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Individual career and service planning </li></ul><ul><li>Individualized job readiness help </li></ul><ul><li>Case Management </li></ul>
    15. 15. One Stop Service System: Training <ul><li>Individual Training Accounts (tuition assistance for vocational / technical training) </li></ul><ul><li>Local flexibility / ability to narrow eligible occupations / industries </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Schools </li></ul><ul><li>On The Job </li></ul><ul><li>Customized (including incumbent worker) </li></ul><ul><li>Eligible Training Provider lists </li></ul>
    16. 16. One Stop Service System: Youth Services <ul><li>Older Youth & Younger Youth </li></ul><ul><li>In School & Out Of School </li></ul><ul><li>Year ‘Round & Summer Components </li></ul><ul><ul><li>10 Mandatory Services: Tutoring & Dropout Prevention, Alternative secondary schools, summer employment, paid and unpaid work experience, occupational skill training, leadership development, supportive services, mentoring, follow up services, comprehensive guidance and counseling </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. One Stop Service System: Business Services (typical) <ul><li>Business Needs Must Be Addressed in Local Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Labor Market Information </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Room </li></ul><ul><li>Referrals </li></ul><ul><li>Job Postings </li></ul>
    18. 18. Common Performance Measures <ul><li>Many partners affected </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Entry into unsubsidized employment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Retention in unsubsidized employment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Earnings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- (youth) placement into employment or education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- (youth) attainment of degree or certificate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- (youth) literacy and numeracy gains </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. What is Workforce Development System?
    20. 20. What is the Joint Work of the Workforce Development System? <ul><li>Three major processes in developing human capital </li></ul><ul><ul><li>educate – prepare/train </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>match - people/skills/openings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>retain - talent/employers </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Process Chart Youth Adults Re-train Educate preK-12 career info post-secondary education Prepare/Train internships dual enrollment transitional continuing new skills new career retain employment Match summer experiences skills & market need/openings skills & market need/openings Retain self-sustaining wages self-sustaining wages
    22. 22. The WIB Roles?
    23. 23. NAWB – Current Thoughts on Re-Auth <ul><li>Clear expectations & measures of success </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate & dependable funding </li></ul><ul><li>Genuine collaboration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal state local </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Engaged leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Employer led WIBs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Significant, relevant & sustained innovation </li></ul>
    24. 24. Timing in 2011 <ul><li>When for Re-Authorization? </li></ul><ul><li>On the agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jobs legislation? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TANF (welfare) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No Child Left Behind </li></ul></ul>WIA ?
    25. 25. Collaboration… <ul><li>“ Politeness is the poison of collaboration” </li></ul><ul><li> - Edwin Land </li></ul><ul><li> “ A dialogue is more than two monologues.” </li></ul><ul><li> - Max M. Kampelman </li></ul>
    26. 26. <ul><li>THANK YOU </li></ul>Christine Quinn President South Central Michigan Works! 517-437-0990 [email_address]
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