A WorkforceInvestment Act Primer:    What It’s About   Where We’ve Been    Where We Are
Purpose of Session• WIA Basics: Background, History, Purpose• How It Works: Infrastructure, Regulations,  Money• Intent• C...
History – skill building is not new
WIA Predecessors•   Federal Control•   Serve Job Seekers Only•   Social Service Intent - helping people•   “Silo” Programs...
W h a t is a W o r k f o r c eD e v e lo p m e n t S y s t e m ?                                   WIBs                   ...
Purpose of WIA• Enhance National Productivity Competitiveness  – Increasing Occupational Skill Levels  – Improving Quality...
WIA Title 1 Funding Structure              DOLETA           Distributes to           State Agencies
P e r s p e c t iv e …              Served      Exiters    PlacementAdult        7,125,900   5,381,582    55.2%Dislocated ...
Workforce Board Composition• Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEOs) appoint  Local Board Members  –   Business Reps (must b...
Board Responsibilities•   Planning•   Contract for Operations & Service Providers•   Oversight for operations & outcomes• ...
How It Works• Boards Directly:  – Ensure Collaboration  – Avoid Duplication  – Fiscal, Regulatory and Performance Complian...
How It Works• Boards Contract for:  –   One Stop Operators?  –   Youth providers  –   Adult?  –   Dislocated Worker Servic...
One Stop Service System• Programs:  – WIA Title 1: Adult, Youth and Dislocated Workers     • Eligibility     • Documentati...
One Stop Service System• Must have one “full service” one-stop in each  area• 17 Mandated Partners  – Determine Roles & Re...
One Stop Service System: Core Services• Intake and Orientation• Skill & Interest Assessment• Access to job listings• Acces...
One Stop Service System:    Intensive Services•   More comprehensive assessments•   Individual career and service planning...
One Stop Service System: Training• Individual Training Accounts (tuition assistance  for vocational / technical training)•...
One Stop Service System: YouthServices• Older Youth & Younger Youth• In School & Out Of School• Year ‘Round & Summer Compo...
One Stop Service System: BusinessServices (typical)• Business Needs Must Be Addressed in Local  Plan• Provide Labor Market...
Common Performance Measures• Many partners affected     - Entry into unsubsidized employment     - Retention in unsubsidiz...
W h a t is t h e J o in t W o r k o fth e Wo r k fo r c eD e v e lo p m e n t S y s t e m ?
P roc e s s C ha rt                    Youth             Adults            Re-train                preK-12           post-...
The Emerging View of the WIB’s Roles?
NAWB: The Essential Thoughts onRe-Auth• Focused on the customers• Administered and decisions made at the  customer-level• ...
So it’s 2012…• November looms in all discussions  – what can be addressed between now & then?  – Elementary & Secondary Ed...
C o lla b o r a t io n …We have to keep talking to all the system:    “A dialogue is more than two monologues.”           ...
THANK YOU Christine Quinn President South Central Michigan Works! 517-437-0990 cquinn@scmw.org
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WIA Overview 101(2012)

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Presentation given at the National Association of Workforce Baords Conference in DC. Target audience: new Board members, elected officials and staff

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  • Land Grant - The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for the states to develop or sell to raise funds to establish and endow "land grant" colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of agriculture, science and engineering as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class rather than higher education's historic core of classical studies.[1] Prior to enactment of the Morrill Act in 1862, Michigan State University was chartered as a state land-grant institution on February 12, 1855, as the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan, receiving an appropriation of 14,000 acres (57 km2) of state-owned land. The Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania, later to become Pennsylvania State University, followed as a state land-grant school on February 22 of that year. Smith-Hughes National Vocational Education Act of 1917 was an act of the United States Congress that promoted vocational agriculture to train people "who have entered upon or who are preparing to enter upon the work of the farm," and provided federal funds for this purpose. As such it is the basis both for the promotion of vocational education , and for its isolation from the rest of the curriculum in most school settings. New Deal – Unemployment Compensation, the Works Progress Administration (public sector employment), Civil Conservation Corps – unprecedented expansion of federal funding for job training CETA - The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (or CETA , Pub.L. 93-203) is a United States federal law enacted in 1973 to train workers and provide them with jobs in the public service. The program offered work to those with low incomes and the long term unemployed as well as summer jobs to low income high school students. Full time jobs were provided for a period of 12 to 24 months in public agencies or private not for profit organizations. The intent was to impart a marketable skill that would allow participants to move to an unsubsidized job. It was an extension of the Works Progress Administration program from the 1930s. The Act was intended to decentralize control of federally controlled job training programs, giving more power to the individual state governments JTPA - The law was enacted to establish federal assistance programs to prepare youth and unskilled adults for entry into the labor force and to provide job training to economically disadvantaged and other individuals facing serious barriers to employment. In order to carry out its purpose, the law authorized appropriations for fiscal year 1983 and for each succeeding fiscal year to carry out adult and youth programs , federally administered programs , summer youth employment and training programs , and employment and training assistance for dislocated workers . FUNCTIONS OF PRIVATE INDUSTRY COUNCIL: Sec. 103.(a) It shall be the responsibility of the private industry council to provide guidance for, and exercise oversight with respect to, activities under the job training plan for its service delivery area in partnership with the unit or units of general local government within its service delivery area.
  • ISSUE : Proposed changes have three (3) paths McKeon: one block grant Foxx: four (4) buckets Adult/dislocated workers youth veterans targeted populations
  • NUMBERS: WIA Service Numbers for PY10 ending 6/30/11 Some Perspective: ~ population of the five (5) boroughs in NYC - # of people who found jobs through social networks McDonald’s serves 64M/day Wagner-Peyser #s - ~25M for the year ending 6/30/11
  • The law seems to be clear that on youth, there is a presumption of contracting, but on Adults & Dislocated workers there is the ability of the Board to have a substantial amount of services covered by the One-stop consortium. So the “?” here is how does the Board want to handle service delivery at the one-stop?
  • Relationship to Other Programs WIA designates a number of mandatory partners in the one-stop system, while other programs are identified as optional partners. Mandatory partners are required to make program core services available at one-stop centers, provide funding for one-stop administration, and provide representation on local WIBs. Mandatory and Optional Federal Program Partners. Mandatory partners include:31  Programs authorized under Titles I (employment and training), II (adult education and literacy), III (the Wagner-Peyser Act), and IV (Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973) of WIA;  The Older American Community Service Employment Program authorized by Title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965;  Postsecondary vocational education activities under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act;  Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) programs under Chapter 2 of Title II of the Trade Act of 1974;  Veteran employment and training programs under Chapter 41, Title 38 of the U.S. Code;  Employment and training activities under the Community Services Block Grant;  Employment and training activities carried out by the Department of Housing and Urban Development; and  Programs authorized by state unemployment compensation laws. Optional partners include programs offered under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps), the National and Community Service Act, and other federal, state, or local programs, including private sector programs.
  • We’ve talked a lot to business/educators/people – we believe this shows the three major processes by which we create human capitol REMEMBER: Regions – like manufacturers – have a decision to make or buy talent; do we create capacity here or do utilize H1B Visas and/or help business recruit from outside the region AFTER you’ve done your homework in establishing what are your major industries & what are their needs, then you can look at market success and market failure Somewhere in the “people issue” for industry, lies one of these processes and the WIB might examine how it helps balance the market in that process
  • Identifying industry sectors that drive the local/regional economy and what is economic development investing in is step #1. Step #2 is to begin to examine how the workforce system responds to the human capitol needs of business - we create human capitol through these three (3) processes and so as we look at critical occupations we might want to know that the supply of labor to them is being taken care of - in a sense, in manf we look at the various processes in producing a part to determine if the part we are making “fits" long before final assembly. Same principle. This also helps WIBs decide if the skill they need can be “made” or if it needs “bought”. When Westinghouse decided to keep their nuclear power design & maintenance in western PA, Three Rivers WIB helped locate the engineering talent they needed. Some of that could be found in the universities in the region, but some had to be “found”. In following through the processes current & future needs could be met through planning and then working with all the players to meet the needs. (helping young people know about engineering & that schools had STEM as a significant part of their curriculum plans – Pittsburgh’s City Schools new technology high school – and that all the issues surrounding the need are thought through.
  • Legislated Roles: Planning Contract for Operations & Service Providers Oversight for operations & outcomes Negotiate Performance Measures with Governor Coordinate Activities with Economic Development and Education / Training Leadership Systems theory in action labor market analysis – what is happening in our market? convening & brokering – what does this data mean? How do we find & implement solutions (BIG dialogue – Messy process of engaging the community) Communicating – labor market data and more so, what’s the meaning for policy makers, education, business, individuals
  • Focused on the customers of the system, primary being business & Job seekers, Administered and decisions made at the customer-level which we suggest means as local as efficiencies of operations allow Governed by effective business-led workforce investment boards that are driven by data based decisions Marked by processes of continuous improvement that NAWB believes is a key factor in a private entity’s market success and thus reinforces the need for business-led boards, Adequately funded to address the most pressing labor market issues Judged by relevant outcomes – what are the metrics? [DISCUSSION WITH THEM?]
  • Super Committee fell apart, so.. Budget agreement over raising the debt ceiling called for 10yr cuts totaling $1.2B $600B from defense – really? How likely is this? $600B from domestic – really? From where when SS is off-the-table
  • These are hard discussion when we convene the community or the system because we all bring bias to the table and we all bring our values It takes a skilled staff and a skilled & respected chair to make this happen
  • WIA Overview 101(2012)

    1. 1. A WorkforceInvestment Act Primer: What It’s About Where We’ve Been Where We Are
    2. 2. Purpose of Session• WIA Basics: Background, History, Purpose• How It Works: Infrastructure, Regulations, Money• Intent• Current Issues and Challenges
    3. 3. History – skill building is not new
    4. 4. WIA Predecessors• Federal Control• Serve Job Seekers Only• Social Service Intent - helping people• “Silo” Programs• Boards Directly Provide Services• Services to Specific Target Groups
    5. 5. W h a t is a W o r k f o r c eD e v e lo p m e n t S y s t e m ? WIBs One-stops Education: Civic: pK -12 CBOs/FBOs Post-secondary Community Groups Competitive Workforce Policy Makers Business Supports: Transportation Economic Housing Development Amenities
    6. 6. Purpose of WIA• Enhance National Productivity Competitiveness – Increasing Occupational Skill Levels – Improving Quality of Workforce• Improve Lives of Workers by: – Increasing Employment, Retention and Earning of Participants• ISSUE: Who is the focus? Incumbent? Dislocated workers/ Low Income? Can you serve them all? Equally well?
    7. 7. WIA Title 1 Funding Structure DOLETA Distributes to State Agencies
    8. 8. P e r s p e c t iv e … Served Exiters PlacementAdult 7,125,900 5,381,582 55.2%Dislocated 1,287,208 800,032 57.3%WorkersYouth 267,454 131,203 59.0% 8,680,562 6,312,817
    9. 9. Workforce Board Composition• Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEOs) appoint Local Board Members – Business Reps (must be board majority) – Economic Development – Education – Labor Organizations – One Stop Partners – Community Based Organizations• ISSUE: Board Membership
    10. 10. Board Responsibilities• Planning• Contract for Operations & Service Providers• Oversight for operations & outcomes• Negotiate Performance Measures with Governor• Coordinate Activities with Economic Development and Education / Training
    11. 11. How It Works• Boards Directly: – Ensure Collaboration – Avoid Duplication – Fiscal, Regulatory and Performance Compliance – Local Strategy Development
    12. 12. How It Works• Boards Contract for: – One Stop Operators? – Youth providers – Adult? – Dislocated Worker Services? – Governor’s have the call on allowance of Boards to provide services
    13. 13. One Stop Service System• Programs: – WIA Title 1: Adult, Youth and Dislocated Workers • Eligibility • Documentation • Service Provision • Tracking • Reporting
    14. 14. One Stop Service System• Must have one “full service” one-stop in each area• 17 Mandated Partners – Determine Roles & Responsibility, level of collaboration, cost sharing – Core Services – Intensive Services – Training Services• ISSUE: How to fund the infra-structure
    15. 15. One Stop Service System: Core Services• Intake and Orientation• Skill & Interest Assessment• Access to job listings• Access to resume writing tools• Labor Market Information• Workshops (job seeking, resume writing, interviewing, etc.)• Info on Partners• Resource Room (computers, phones, etc.)
    16. 16. One Stop Service System: Intensive Services• More comprehensive assessments• Individual career and service planning• Individualized job readiness help• Case Management
    17. 17. One Stop Service System: Training• Individual Training Accounts (tuition assistance for vocational / technical training)• Local flexibility / ability to narrow eligible occupations / industries• Technical Schools• On The Job• Customized (including incumbent worker)• Eligible Training Provider lists
    18. 18. One Stop Service System: YouthServices• Older Youth & Younger Youth• In School & Out Of School• Year ‘Round & Summer Components − 10 Mandatory Services: Tutoring & Dropout Prevention, Alternative secondary schools, summer employment, paid and unpaid work experience, occupational skill training, leadership development, supportive services, mentoring, follow up services, comprehensive guidance and counseling
    19. 19. One Stop Service System: BusinessServices (typical)• Business Needs Must Be Addressed in Local Plan• Provide Labor Market Information• Resource Room• Referrals• Job Postings
    20. 20. Common Performance Measures• Many partners affected - Entry into unsubsidized employment - Retention in unsubsidized employment - Earnings - (youth) placement into employment or education - (youth) attainment of degree or certificate - (youth) literacy and numeracy gains ISSUE: What are the “right” metrics? Adult literacy = jobs or preparedness? Business Services? WIBs?
    21. 21. W h a t is t h e J o in t W o r k o fth e Wo r k fo r c eD e v e lo p m e n t S y s t e m ?
    22. 22. P roc e s s C ha rt Youth Adults Re-train preK-12 post-secondary Educate career info education new skills internships transitionalPrepare/Train dual enrollment continuing new career retain employment summer skills & market skills & market Match experiences need/openings need/openings self-sustaining self-sustaining Retain wages wages
    23. 23. The Emerging View of the WIB’s Roles?
    24. 24. NAWB: The Essential Thoughts onRe-Auth• Focused on the customers• Administered and decisions made at the customer-level• Governed by effective business-led workforce investment boards with data based decisions• Marked by processes of continuous improvement• Adequately funded• Judged by relevant outcomes
    25. 25. So it’s 2012…• November looms in all discussions – what can be addressed between now & then? – Elementary & Secondary Education Act? – WIA?• Oh yea….that budget stuff – President level funds WIA – House? – Senate?• Budget or Continuing Resolution?
    26. 26. C o lla b o r a t io n …We have to keep talking to all the system: “A dialogue is more than two monologues.” - Max M. KampelmanBut… “Politeness is the poison of collaboration” - Edwin Land
    27. 27. THANK YOU Christine Quinn President South Central Michigan Works! 517-437-0990 cquinn@scmw.org

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