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Vocab ssiltt 2012   show-1
 

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  • Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Thirsty --- Bone-dry, cottonmouthed, dehydrated, parched, yearning for…, Raining – drizzling, misting, coming down in buckets, shower, sprinkle, drizzle Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Part 1
  • Part 1 Function words cue a reader to the structure of a sentence, are, that, a to, the of, etc.--make spoekn languagemeanginful These 107 words (sight words) make up 50% of words in texts, and are part of oral language development--don ’ t study them Tier 1--words whose meanings students are likely to know already--clock, lunch, baby, --don ’ t study Tier 2 words--fortunate, maintaint, merchant, environment, exhale, likely to appear in a wide variety of texts fairly frequently, and in oral language. These are the words for explicit study Tier 3--irksome, pallet, retinue--very rare, appear only once or twice in a text, specific, and so can use context to figure them out Given a text, find some tier 1, 2, 2 and function words for a grade level you select
  • Word Ladder Part 1
  • Can be made into an anchor chart, laminated, and used repeatedly. Use for all different kinds of vocab– math (rhombus, pentagon, etc) – language (personification, hyperbole, etc) Part 1

Vocab ssiltt 2012   show-1 Vocab ssiltt 2012 show-1 Presentation Transcript

  • SSILTT 2012Teaching Vocabulary
  • Teaching Vocabulary• Supports content area learning-- concepts, ideas, connections, domain- specific vocabulary• Supports literacy in general• Mississippi has a history of low vocabulary achievement
  • Vocabulary differs across income groups (Hart and Risley) 1200Vocabulary (known words) 1000 800 Professional 600 Working Class Welfare 400 200 0 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 Months
  • Less effective instruction:• Memorizing definitions for 10 or 20 words a week (or a word of the week) – These words don’t reappear in student talk or writing – Copying definitions Through incidental learning in a language rich environment, students can learn 17-20 words/day, 3000 words/year
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one tothe other: The diameter and thecircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one to Me and my parentsthe other: The diameter and the correlate because withoutcircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation them I wouldn’t be here.
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one to Me and my parentsthe other: The diameter and the correlate because withoutcircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation them I wouldn’t be here.Meticulous. Very carefulor too particular aboutsmall details
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one to Me and my parentsthe other: The diameter and the correlate because withoutcircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation them I wouldn’t be here.Meticulous. Very careful I was meticulous aboutor too particular about falling off the cliff.small details
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one to Me and my parentsthe other: The diameter and the correlate because withoutcircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation them I wouldn’t be here.Meticulous. Very careful I was meticulous aboutor too particular about falling off the cliff.small detailsRedress. 1. Set right;repair; remedy: King Arthurtried to redress wrongs inhis kingdom.
  • DefinitionsDictionary Definitions Students’ SentencesCorrelate. 1. Be related one to Me and my parentsthe other: The diameter and the correlate because withoutcircumference of a circlecorrelate. 2. Put into relation them I wouldn’t be here.Meticulous. Very careful I was meticulous aboutor too particular about falling off the cliff.small detailsRedress. 1. Set right; The redress for gettingrepair; remedy: King Arthur well when you’re sick is totried to redress wrongs in stay in bed.his kingdom.
  • What does work: Reading• Wide reading is THE most important way to foster vocabulary development – Wide reading – Wide reading – Wide reading
  • Create a Language-Rich Environment• Use interesting words yourself• Play with words• Word of the day
  • Return their language to them with more interesting vocab• I’m thirsty!  I’m _________• It’s raining!  It’s _________• What are we having for lunch?• This homework stinks!
  • Explicit Instruction in UsingMorphemes for Structural Analysis• Morphemes--meaningful chunks of words• Morphology--study of the meaningful chunks of words• Roots, affixes (suffixes and prefixes)• How many morphemes in shoes, celery, polysyllabic?
  • Ways to teach the meanings of morphemes• Word sorts (in-, un-)• Word chains (sort polyhedron words)• Root word/Vocabulary Trees (def is “roots”, branches are words that use root, twigs are where you heard it)• Think of a sort you could do that focuses on the meanings of word parts (morphemes) important in your discipline (e.g., in math: graph means picture vs. graph means word)• Share
  • Model Using Morphemes to Figure Out Words• Discuss handout/procedures for a think- aloud• Think out loud about how you used morphemes to figure out the meaning of a word• Devon model• Groups practice and share• Discuss
  • Using morphemes to figure out wordsSometimes morphemes are all you need:• indefatigable What are some key morphemes in your content area?
  • Adding in context• Sometimes not so helpful She was a sartorial nightmare.• Sometimes helpful. His sartorial style runs toward jeans, Hawaiian shirts and cowboy boots. The doctor prescribed me an antipruritic for my poison ivy.
  • Explicit Instruction in Using Context• Model, model, model• Demonstrate using more and more context
  • Using Context• How could I be such a mensa?
  • Using Context• How could I be such a mensa? She scolded herself as she sat cross-legged, the telephone cradled in one hand and a cookie in the other.
  • Using Context• How could I be such a mensa? She scolded herself as she sat cross-legged, the telephone cradled in one hand and a cookie in the other. She blamed her biology teacher for her problem.
  • Using Context• How could I be such a mensa? She scolded herself as she sat cross-legged, the telephone cradled in one hand and a cookie in the other. She blamed her biology teacher for her problem. If he hadn’t made them dissect frogs, she wouldn’t have been so absentminded. (from Gary Soto’s The Challenge)
  • Kinds of Context Clues• Definition: . . . Then the predator, an animal that hunts and eats other animals, entered• Synonym: He walked with alacrity, hurrying to his destination• Antonym: He walked slothfully, you could never get him to hurry• Example: Predators like lions, tigers, bears, sharks, eagles, even bats . . . .• Gist: vaguely somewhere in the text (mensa)
  • Teach with a think-aloud•Think out loud. Explain your thinking tostudents to model how to use context clues tofigure out the word.•Practice it in groups. Find a difficult or likelyunfamiliar word in your text, think aloud abouthow you used context to figure it out. Name the“kind” of context clue you used.•Share.
  • Look in your framework• What morphemes are there?• What’s a sort or other activity you could do to teach the meaning of one of those?
  • When morphemes and context won’t work: Using Reference Tools• Must be a sophisticated user and know the first definition won’t always work• Which definition fits the meaning of the sentence: – “Cell phones are polluting our most sacred family traditions such as the evening meal.”• What “text features” do you need to know to use this reference tool?• Other reference tools?
  • Explicit Study of Words: Selecting Words for Study• Function words - glue sentences together (the, because, is)• Tier 1 words - already known (school, baby)• Tier 2 words - worth studying, multiple meanings, important to content, key morphemes, etc.• Tier 3 words - exceedingly rare and specialized (antipruritic)
  • Triple-Entry Vocab Journal• Select words for journals or let students record words as they write (see handout)• After, let students compare responses Word in context Look up, Picture, of sentence in choose right memory aid, or text, underlined def, write in phrase own words
  • Word Sorts• Conceptual word sorts: – Conceptually (e.g., related to nervous vs. digestive system, spiders vs. insects, etc.) – Open word sorts--students decide how to sort them• There’s value in the debating• Sort words before, during, and after reading/thematic study• Think of other ways to sort words• Sort the same set of words multiple ways
  • Word Chains• Sort words according to a scale or quality – Synonyms for hunger, most to least – Put words in order according to a chemical process or mathematical procedure – Environmental consequences of different ways of getting energy (solar, coal, nuclear), from least to most harmful• Come up with a word chain to teach words in your content area
  • Possible Sentences• Teacher selects a few words before study• Students analyze them, then create a “possible sentence”• After study, students rewrite possible sentences based on new knowledge of words » Janet Allen
  • Interactive Word Wall• Select words for content/concept study• List on word wall before/during/after• Sort words according to concepts or put in alphabetical order--so they’re easy to find and useful• USE the words throughout study
  • Using Interactive Word Wall Words• Sort the words• Use the words to write summaries• Write narratives or poems using the words together• Use the words in a Venn diagram• Hold students accountable for spelling these words correctly in writing• Word 20-questions or charades• Use the words in a persuasive letter etc.• Other ideas?
  • Portable Word Wall• Individualized word walls
  • Other Graphic Organizers• Word Web/Spider Map• Word Scroll• Folded flash cards-fold like a note card, word on front, def on top inside, examples on bottom inside, illustration on the back• Others?
  • Words Across Contexts: Homographs• Encourages thinking about the content-specific meanings of words and the concepts in the text• What would the word surf mean to: A. A kid on the beach? B. A techie? C. Someone watching TV?• What would the word current mean to: A. An electrician B. A boat captain C. A newspaper writerDo one of your own!
  • Word Knowledge Rating ScaleWord Know it well Have seen or Have no idea heard it
  • Word Detective
  • Frayer ModelDefinition in your own words Facts/CharacteristicsA quadrilateral is a shape with * 4 sides4 sides. * May or may not be * equal length * Sides may or may not Quadrilateral be parallelExamples Nonexamples•Square •Circle•Rectangle •Triangle•Trapezoid •Pentagon•rhombus •dodecahdron
  • Verbal and Visual Word Association (VVWA)
  • Wrap-Up Re-sort words List all strategies so far/use notecards. Go throughframework and discuss which could be used for thebenchmarks in Competencies 1 and 2.