From E-Learning to Active Learning: Transforming the Learning Environment

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Experts from University College London share findings and best practices.

Slides from a webinar event 25 April 2013

Always on the forefront of education and research, University College London boasts one of the world’s most sophisticated e-learning strategies and learning environments. With a mission to deliver the “voices and ideas of UCL experts” to a global audience, the team bringing that goal to fruition is uncovering the benefits of e-learning. By utilising blended learning technologies, the UCL E-Learning Environments team realises the potential to deliver an active learning experience to instructors and students alike.

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From E-Learning to Active Learning: Transforming the Learning Environment

  1. 1. From E-Learning to Active Learning: Transforming the Learning Environment Carl Gombrich, Steve Rowett and Clive Young University College London
  2. 2. Steve Rowett E-Learning Environments
  3. 3. • “London’s Global University” • Founded in 1826 as the first university in England for students of any race and religion • Now a top 20 global research university with income of £800m ($1,200m) per year • 25,000 students • Term structure; exams at end of academic year About University College London
  4. 4. “UCL will be flexible, innovative and at the forefront of developments in the use of new technologies to support and enhance teaching and learning.” UCL Council White Paper 2010-2010 UCL strategy
  5. 5. • Echo 360 rebranded as “Lecturecast” • Installed in 62 lecture theatres • A few departments record all lectures, but most leave choice to individual lecturer Lecture recording at UCL
  6. 6. • 5700 teaching events recorded so far in 2012-13 • About 20% of all lectures • 200,000 student views of recordings in 2012-13 (and we haven’t yet reached the peak exam period) • Average of 10,000 views per week Some statistics
  7. 7. Carl Gombrich Programme Director, Bachelor of Arts and Sciences (BASc)
  8. 8. http://lecturecast.ucl.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/adc1491d-6554-49fc-a595-74a9093a3be5
  9. 9. How flipping the lecture hall and engaging with students’ questions can improve learning and teaching Five Steps to Successful Flipping
  10. 10. • Personal capture software downloaded to desktop • Standard camera and microphone – built in options work fine • The usual Microsoft Office documents + any bespoke images etc. you wish to include • Graphics tablet (optional, but can add a lot) – I used Wacom/Bamboo Equipment
  11. 11. • Record lectures in advance – at home, in the office, even outside. Use Lecturecast -- Easy. • Ask students to view lecture before timetabled lecture slot. • Ask students to upload 3 questions each with timings based on the lecture – and send these questions to Moodle. • Take a poll of the most popular, say, 10, questions. • Go to the timetabled lecture slot with questions: interact, debate, solve problems with the students. What to do
  12. 12. • HQ screenshot What to do
  13. 13. • Students can interact with lecturers on questions that interest them/problems they want to work through. • Students/lecturers get better relationships in terms of mentoring/personal contact etc. • Submitting questions is part of formative assessment so everyone is involved in the learning. • Active learning: lecture times can be used for summative assessments: short tests, blog pieces, group work, debates. Good things about this
  14. 14. • Maybe the equipment won’t work – I hate technology :-/ • It will take me double the time – 1 hr to record the lecture, 1hr for the interactive class • I hate working to camera • Students and colleagues will make fun of me or say inappropriate things about my style or the lecture Things you might worry about:
  15. 15. • Maybe the equipment won’t work – I hate technology :-/ • It will take me double the time – 1 hr to record the lecture, 1hr for the interactive class • I hate working to camera • Students and colleagues will make fun of me or say inappropriate things about my style or the lecture o Don’t worry; be happy  Things you might worry about:
  16. 16. On flipping, see e.g. • http://mast.unco.edu/programs/vodcasting/ • http://vodcasting.ning.com/forum/topics/screen-recording • http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html • http://andrewdouch.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/flipping-the-classroom/ For a good ‘how to...’, see • http://vodcasting.ning.com/video/how-to-make-an-educational-screencast-mac • On fears of using the technology/inappropriate comments, see http://www.sonicfoundry.com/webcast/5-reasons-faculty-shouldnt-fear-lecture- capture?fullscreen=1 References
  17. 17. Steve Rowett E-Learning Environments
  18. 18. Feedback from student survey Of the lectures you watched online, how many did you also attend in person?
  19. 19. • “Lecturecast: more useful than when the lecture was attended in person as you can replay sections of the lecture and perhaps did not understand the first time and pause it to take notes.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Good uses of technology
  20. 20. • “Lecturecast and slides online. Without these, attending lectures in October is completely useless by the time you get to summer exams, as I can't write everything fast enough at the time or remember what they said.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Good uses of technology
  21. 21. • “Using Lecturecast. This has really helped to go over the parts of the lecture which I didn't fully understand / didn't have time to write down so quickly. It helps me to consolidate smaller parts of the lecture, as I can pause whenever I wish to do so.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Good uses of technology
  22. 22. • “Lecturecast extremely helpful for statistics lectures - I come from a humanities background and initially struggled with subject matter. Being able to listen to each lecture more than once was hugely helpful.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Good uses of technology
  23. 23. • “Lecturecast together with discussion forums afterwards. Promotes understanding via discussion and further question could be asked.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Good uses of technology
  24. 24. Clive Young E-Learning Environments
  25. 25. The pedagogy of lecture capture • UCL lead on European Erasmus project REC:all – recording and augmenting lectures for learning • Can lecture capture systems enable new models of learning design? • Guides published in 2013 [www.rec-all.info/] :all
  26. 26. Opposing views? • Is lecture capture the single worst example of poor educational technology use in higher education? (Mark Smithers 2011) or • The uninspired label “lecture capture,” fails to convey the disruptive potential of this tool (Janet Russell 2012)
  27. 27. Elements of educational video Image + Interactivity + Input + Integration Film strip/slide TV / VHS Desktop video Multimedia Web media Lecture capture Cloud/social video
  28. 28. • visual demonstration, dramatisation, presenting visual evidence, emotional appeal (Hempe 1999) • authenticity and reality (Thornhill et al 2002) • "retain information better if able to visualise a lecturer saying it” (UCL student) • help orientate esp. if students unfamiliar with material or lecturer (Kukkonen 2012) Image Image
  29. 29. Interactivity • Access – own devices, Choice – on- demand, search, Control – start, stop, pause, review (Rosenberg 2001) • Popular at UCL: “we can listen to the lectures again for better understanding of the topics!“ • Big users non-native speakers of English and the “very motivated” (Stewart, 2012)
  30. 30. Interactivity • A transmission model of learning? (Jouvelakis 2009, Smithers 2011) • Davis (2009) - students are "actively choosing specific sections of content to review rather than passively revisiting entire lectures”. • “...an active learning activity *that+ provides them with additional control and interaction with the material“
  31. 31. Integration (and Flipping) Ideas • Prepare or motivate • Elaborate on and further explain • Recall and integrate • Lead-in to an assignment • Learning guidance and strategies • Content to encourage analysis dial-e designs (JISC)
  32. 32. Input (from students) Role of the student [after Chris O’Hagan+ • Sit back film and TV • Sit forward internet video • Stand up ‘social video’ – commenting and contribution – lecture capture not an archive but and active resource, open to debate. New models of assessment http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/310344132/
  33. 33. • Image - instruction • Interactivity - construction • Integration – conversation and context • Input - participation Analysing lecture capture
  34. 34. Beyond lecture capture
  35. 35. Beyond ‘lecture capture’
  36. 36. Steve Rowett E-Learning Environments
  37. 37. • Lecturetools • A more interactive lecture experience • Trialling from September 2013 • Live streaming of lectures • Valuable service for students? • Efficiencies in real estate Future developments
  38. 38. Live streaming of lectures Graph showing demand for live streaming of lectures
  39. 39. Live streaming of lectures If we streamed your lectures live, how many would you watch online and how many would you watch in person?
  40. 40. • “I think Lecturecast is a good thing - however if lectures were streamed live I think it would be inevitable that students wouldn't attend lectures and therefore not engage with the course.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Live streaming
  41. 41. • “The current level of technology provides me with enough support without taking away from the tactile experience that comes from attending lectures and interacting with the professor and students in person.” Student comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Live streaming
  42. 42. • “I disagree strongly with being able to stream lectures live - why should I bother coming in to teach if none of the students can be bothered. it should work both ways if this is to be implemented, i.e. possibility of the teaching to happen remotely too.” Staff comment, UCL Student IT Survey, January 2013 Live streaming
  43. 43. “I was quite surprised to find that students will absolutely defend to the death the lecture – a mode of learning that many of us are getting used to thinking of as an out-of- date method of teaching.” Toni Pearce, National Union of Students
  44. 44. poor educational technology or positive disruptive potential Final thought
  45. 45. Questions and discussion
  46. 46. From E-Learning to Active Learning: Transforming the Learning Environment Carl Gombrich, Steve Rowett and Clive Young University College London

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