Uploaded on

Workshop at UAL …

Workshop at UAL
London University of Arts
Alexandra Okada

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
862
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Developing argumentative maps for reading and writing Alexandra Okada The Open University Knowledge Media Institute [email_address]
  • 2. What is an argumentative map? It is a graphical representation which connects YOUR THOUGHTS IDEAS THAT YOU HEAR INFORMATION THAT YOU SEE THINGS THAT YOU FEEL THROUGH QUESTIONS… CLAIMS… PROS… CONS…. EVIDENCE… CONCLUSION
  • 3. Agenda 1. Introduction 2. Examples 3. Activities Reading… Mapping… Writing… 4. Discussion 5. Next steps…
  • 4. What criteria do you consider important for writing a good essay? (select 4) Understanding of context Strong Argumentation Understanding of concepts Evidence of reading Factual accuracy Clear Structure Personal stance Consistent Conclusion Relevance to question
  • 5.
    • You have to take a stance if you like so you decide where you’re going to be and then you can take views that are similar to your views and then flip over and argue the other side, people who’ve got a different view, to put their view across so you’ve got two sides of the argument but still stick with your view in the conclusion (Freya AS208 Arts - North, 2003)
    What do you understand by “argument”? Have you identified it as something teachers would be looking for in your essays?
  • 6. You have to take a stance (a position in an argument) if you like so you decide where you’re going to be (your main claim) and then you can take views that are similar to your views and then flip over and argue the other side, people who’ve got a different view, to put their view across so you’ve got two sides of the argument but still stick with your view in the conclusion (Freya AS208 Arts - North, 2003) What do you understand by “argument”? Have you identified it as something teachers would be looking for in your essays?
  • 7. STANCE A POSITION ARGUMENT VIEWS SIMILAR DIFFERENT TWO SIDES OF ARGUMENT IS IN MEANS HIGHLIGTS CONCLUSION YOUR VIEW INTRODUCTION DISCUSSION END Mapping main concepts for argumentative writing
  • 8. What do you understand by “argument”? Have you identified it as something teachers would be looking for in your essays?
    • I’m assuming that my tutor will then be looking to see that I’ve made a coherent persuasive and balanced argument […] that presumably that I’ve taken the evidence weighed it up interpreted it as belonging to one side or the other that I’ve considered both sides of the question and then taken a line that isn’t just sitting on the fence or if I have sat on the fence I’ve explained why it’s necessary to sit on the fence and I’ve put my reasons and justif- you know put my opinions with a justification. (Teresa AS208 Sci - North, 2003)
  • 9. What do you understand by “argument”? Have you identified it as something teachers would be looking for in your essays? I’m assuming that my tutor will then be looking to see that I’ve made a coherent persuasive and balanced argument […] that presumably that I’ve taken the evidence weighed it up interpreted it as belonging to one side or the other that I’ve considered both sides of the question and then taken a line that isn’t just sitting on the fence or if I have sat on the fence I’ve explained why it’s necessary to sit on the fence and I’ve put my reasons and justif- you know put my opinions with a justification . (Teresa AS208 Sci - North, 2003)
  • 10. CONHERENT CLEAR POSITION EVIDENCE INTERPRETED VIEWS BOTH SIDES BALANCED MEANS WITH MEANS HIGHLIGTS PERSUASIVE YOUR REASONS ARGUMENT WICH CONSIDER OF QUESTION JUSTIFICATIONS WITH MUST BE
  • 11. Toulmin argumentation scheme In Toulmin form, there are six basic components of an argumentative move: Claim : is the position on the issue and the essence of the argument. This represents the arguer’s conclusion. Data : i.e. initial grounds for the argument and evidence that can be accepted as factually true. This can be based on facts, events, examples and statistics. Warrant : evidence used to support the connection between the data and the claim. It can be “authoritative” based on a reference by an expert; “motivational” based on convictions or “substantive” based on example, classification, generalization or cause and consequence. In science, the quality of the warrant is based on scientific concepts (substantive) rather than own convictions (motivational). Rebuttal : This states the exceptions to the claim and is an exception to the truthfulness of the argument. It illustrates instances where the argument may not be true. Qualifier : This states the "strength" of the claim. It represents the validity of an argument and indicates the context or circumstances where the argument is “true”. Backing : A source of authority for the warrant…
  • 12. Toulmin argumentation scheme Evidenced-based Dialogue Map Simplifying Toulmin’s Scheme through Evidence-based Dialogue Map
  • 13. How to use Compendium http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/course/view.php?name=KM
  • 14. Using Compendium to map ideas and documents
  • 15. Activity Using Compendium for reading
    • DESUBLIMATION Gérard Wajcman translated by Barbara P. Fulks Art: Janine Antoni
    • DOCUMENTS OF DISSENT - MARTHA ROSLER Art in America ,   March, 2001  by Eleanor Heartney
  • 16. Can you find good arguments in this text? Knowledge Mapping for reading This is to say that I would like simply to introduce a historic factor into the debate on psychoanalysis and art. In truth, Lacan already envisaged it. In this regard, a remark in Seminar VII seems to me to be somewhat unrecognized. Lacan said at this time: " There is no correct evaluation possible of sublimation in art if we do not think that every production of art, especially of the Beaux-Arts, is historically dated. One does not paint in Picasso's epoch as one painted in Velasquez's epoch, one does not write a novel any more in 1930 like one wrote in the time of Stendhal ." I have the strange impression that psychoanalysts have remained blind and deaf to this remark and this dimension, and that one generally treats the concept of sublimation as a transcendental concept, eternal, universal and intangible, entirely unconnected in any case from the history of art and of the historicity of works of art. DESUBLIMATION Gérard Wajcman translated by Barbara P. Fulks Art: Janine Antoni
  • 17. Activity Using Compendium for writing
    • Choose the topic for mapping and writing about
    • DESUBLIMATION Gérard Wajcman translated by Barbara P. Fulks Art: Janine Antoni
    • DOCUMENTS OF DISSENT - MARTHA ROSLER Art in America ,   March, 2001  by Eleanor Heartney
    • AN ISSUE IN YOUR THESIS
  • 18. Discussing Examples developed
  • 19.
    • How useful do you think maps are for constructing scientific arguments?
    • Did you find any problems during the process of mapping?
    • Would you use a map in future? If so, say why?
    • Overall, does the map make the process of reading and writing any easier? Why?
    Research – knowledge mapping
  • 20.
    • Next Steps
    http://labspace.open.ac.uk/UAL
  • 21. References
    • Okada, A.; Buckingham Shum,S & Sherborne,T. (2008, in press). Knowledge Cartography: software tools and mapping techniques, London:Springer. http:// kmi.open.ac.uk /books/knowledge-cartography
    • Okada, A. and Buckingham Shum, S. (2008, forthcoming) Evidence-Based Dialogue Maps as a research tool to evaluate the quality of school pupils’ scientific argumentation.
    • North, S. (2003) Emergent disciplinarity in an interdisciplinary course: theme use in undergraduate essays in the history of science. A thesis submitted to the Open University.