H&S And Project Planning
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H&S And Project Planning

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A briefing on heath and safety and project planning for students in engineering at Swansea University. Updated October 2009.

A briefing on heath and safety and project planning for students in engineering at Swansea University. Updated October 2009.

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    H&S And Project Planning H&S And Project Planning Presentation Transcript

    • EG-353 Research Project Health and Safety & Project Planning
    • Health and Safety
      • Safety regulations
      • Things you must k now
      • Safety procedure
      • Your responsibly
      • Risk Assessment
      • Safe working
    • The School Safety Regulations Read Them!
    • Object of the Safety Regulations
      • To assist you in observing reasonable safety measures and thereby minimise the risk of injury to yourself and also damage to property.
      • To educate you in safety and to give you an example in laboratory organization and practice which is safe and manages risk.
      • To allow you to follow the University’s safety Policy Statement.
      See Section 1 of the Safety Regulations
    • University Safety Organization
      • Vice Chancellor
      • Heads of School
      • Members of Staff
      • School Safety Officer
      • You
      See Section 5 of the Safety Regulations
    • Things You Must Know
      • Emergency Telephone Numbers
      • Fire arrangements
        • in particular your nearest exit and marshalling point
      • First aid arrangements
        • Occupational health centre
        • First-aid boxes
        • First aiders
      See Sections 2, 3 and 4 of the Safety Regulations
    •  
    • Safety Procedure
      • You are expected to act responsibly
      • It is your duty to report anything you consider to be unsafe to the Safety Officer
      • All accidents which cause personal injury and absence from work for three or more days will be reported to HSE
      • All minor accidents have to reported to school safety advisor
      See Section 6 of the Safety Regulations
    • Your Safety and Responsibilities
      • “ In academic activities, you are presumed to be untrained and uninformed in all matters of professional, personal and public safety”
      • Practice of the school is to give you more responsibility as you progress.
      • Particularly true of Level 3 where practical work is an essential component.
      • Your supervisor is essentially responsible for your training and informing you of any risks associated with your project.
      See Section 7 of the Safety Regulations
    • The Risk Assessment Form
      • Completed on line by your supervisor
      • Reviewed and accepted by you
      • Paper version in back of the Safety Regulations
      • No submitted form = no practical work!
      See Section 8 of the Safety Regulations
    • Demo
    •  
    • The Risk Assessment Process
      • Instigated by your supervisor who should
        • discuss your project’s risks with you
        • define the hazards that you may encounter
        • ensure that you receive necessary training
        • ensure that you have proper protective clothing, etc.
        • ensure that you are made aware of specific laboratory regulations that apply to your project/work place.
      • When submitted you will receive an email with link to engineering intranet
      • You need to login to engineering intranet to indicate that you have read and understood your project’s risk assessment and to “sign it off”
      • Your login is same as for University intranet.
    • Safe Practice in Laboratories and Workshops
      • Laboratories are to be kept clean and tidy
      • British Standards and Codes of Practice are to be followed
      • Services switched off at the end of the day
      • Notices must be attached to potential hazards
      • Names and contact details of personnel
      • Radioactive material labelled as such
      • No smoking. No Drinking!
      • Your supervisor should brief you fully on particular local regulations!
      See Section 11 of the Safety Regulations
    •  
    • Working in Labs
      • Working hours 8.30 am to 1.00 pm and 2.00 pm to 4.30 pm.
      • You are not allowed to carry out experimental work outside working ours unless with explicit, documented permission.
      • High risk equipment can only be used if you have been trained in its use and while under supervision of your supervisor, a technician or a demonstrator.
      See Section 12 of the Safety Regulations
    • Designated High Risk Equipment
      • Listed in the Safety Regulations
      • Usable only with permission of a technician who is satisfied that you know how to safely use the equipment and understand the risks.
      • No workshop equipment to be used!
      See Section 14 of the Safety Regulations
    • IT Labs
      • IT labs available to all students from 8.30 am to 5.00 pm on week days
      • Room 43 available until 6.00 pm on week days
      • No access to IT labs at week ends.
      See Section 16 of the Safety Regulations
    • Other Considerations
      • See the safety regulations for specific information on general safety and specific hazards.
      • Your supervisor should advise you on specific hazards that apply in your case.
      See Sections 18-20 of the Safety Regulations
    • When in doubt, do nothing without expert guidance
    • Project Planning
      • Purpose of the plan
      • What to plan
      • How to plan
      • Typical plans
      • Gantt charts
      • Using the plan
    • Purpose of the Plan
      • Gets you to define the scope of your project
      • Enables you to break your project down into manageable tasks
      • Gets you to think about how to best allocate your time
      • Ensures that you record and therefore meet all the deadlines
      • Provides a means of tracking/control/evaluation
      • Moves the ownership and responsibility for your project from your supervisor to you!
    • What Goes into the Plan
      • The aims (outcomes) of the project that you expect to have achieved by the end (you’ll be assessed on these)
      • A description of the project – in your own words (ownership)
      • A list of the tasks that have to be performed to achieve the aims of your project
      • A list of the milestones (deliverables) that will enable you, your supervisor and the School, to monitor and track your progress
      • A timetable (Gantt chart) for the project that indicates the time allocated to each task and the delivery (due dates) of the milestones.
    • How to Plan
      • Discuss your project with the supervisor
      • Agree on the aims and the description
      • Get advice on the activities that will be needed to complete the project (these will depend on the type of project)
      • Put the tasks into a sequence that starts from nothing and ends with a delivered thesis.
      • Allocate time to each task (seek advice, but be prepared to guess) and put the tasks on to a timeline. (Project started on September 29th.)
    •  
    • Typical Plans
      • Aims
      • Description
      • Main tasks
      • Milestones
      • Gantt chart
    • The Aims
      • A list of two to five objectives that you expect to have achieved by the end of the project
      • Presented in the form of one sentence bullet points.
        • These appear on page one of the Planning Statement (and will form basis of assessment)
        • Be realistic and conservative (examiners will be impressed if you exceed the aims, but may mark you down if you fail to meet all that you said that you would)
      • Note : the project aims are not the same as the learning outcomes for the research project module
    • Description
      • You chose (or were allocated) a project based on the supervisor’s description.
      • The description is your version of the project brief.
      • It should be in your own words and may have different emphasis and scope from that of the original suggestion.
      • It is important that you have discussed this with your supervisor and that you have both agreed a description.
      • To help the examiners, you should clearly indicate in your description the type of project:
        • Research, experimental study, software development, product design, etc.
      • It’s your project: You have to own the description!
    • Main Tasks
      • To complete any large project, it needs to broken down into small well defined sub projects.
      • These can be tackled independently and completion is often marked by a milestone
      • Some tasks will be completed in parallel, but the key ones will form a sequence.
      • Some tasks will be common to all projects, others will be project specific.
    • Common Tasks + milestones
      • Project planning/progress monitoring
        • project planning statement, progress report
      • Library research
        • “ Literature review” chapter in thesis
      • Write up
        • Thesis/extended abstract/presentation for viva
    • A Traditional Research Project
      • Typical Aim :
        • to determine known knowledge about a topic
      • Tasks :
        • Perform a library search (search results)
        • Gather materials (copies of relevant sources)
        • Extract and précis important information (abstracts)
        • Compare views across sources (comparison of sources)
        • Perform a critical review (literature review)
        • Present the known knowledge (thesis)
    • An Experimental Study
      • Typical Aim :
        • to discover/verify a new theory or investigate a new technique/material/approach
      • Tasks :
        • Understand the problem (theory)
        • Design experiment (method)
        • Perform experiment(s) (results)
        • Discuss the results (discussion)
        • Form Conclusions (thesis)
    • A Design Project
      • Typical Aim :
        • to determine known knowledge about a topic
      • Tasks :
        • Gather requirements (requirements)
        • High level design (conceptual design)
        • Detailed design (mechanical drawing/software design)
        • Implementation (product/prototype)
        • Test (test results)
        • Evaluate (thesis)
    • Milestones
      • External indicators of progress
      • Standard milestones (dates specified in first briefing)
        • Project planning statement (PPS)
        • Progress report (PR)
        • Dissertation and Extended Abstract
        • Presentation and Defense (viva)
      • Other milestones
        • Depend on the project type
    • How much detail?
    • KISS Keep it simple stupid it
    • A matter of time
      • 300 hours
      • 11 weeks before Christmas
      • But wait … 2 weeks have already gone!
      • So 9 week s before Christmas
      • 8 weeks a fter exams
      • 5 weeks to write up
      • 300 / (9 + 8 + 5) = 14 hours per week
      • Tick Tock!
    • Gantt Chart Shows You (and your supervisor)
      • When you have time
      • How much time you have
      • What tasks you have
      • When are milestones due
      • When you will be working
      • When you won’t be working
      • All tasks/milestones identified in plan must appear on chart
      • My advice : KISS and go for a simple “waterfall model”
    • Typical Gantt Chart
    • Using the plan
      • Most projects will have a critical path which has to be carefully controlled
        • If a task on the critical path over-runs the project will be late.
      • You may have to re-plan if progress is better/worse than expected.
      • Plan helps you to assign time to your project and your supervisor to monitor your progress and effort.
      • Failure to follow plan is not necessarily a failure of the project
        • providing you learn from the experience and can justify need to re-plan.
      • Failure to follow the plan because it was never realistic will result in lost marks!
    • The Progress Report
      • Your first chance to publicly compare your progress against the plan.
      • Lists achievements against plans:
        • Tasks completed versus tasks to be completed
        • Milestones delivered
        • Accounts for slow or faster progress then expected
        • Discusses any changes that were needed as project aims became clearer
        • Presents a modified Gantt chart if appropriate
      • Should be brief!
    • Summary
      • Health and safety and risk assessment
      • Project Planning
    • What now?
      • Discuss your project with you supervisor and determine aims, description and main tasks.
      • S/He will instigate your risk assessment.
      • You should draft a project plan – use the template provided on Blackboard – for discussion with your supervisor a week before the deadline.
      • Both must be complete by 5.00 pm, Friday 24 th October.
        • Risk assessment completed on School Intranet
        • Email project plan (in Word .doc format) to designated research group coordinator with CC to supervisor – one document please!
        • Name document eg-353-pps-student-number.doc .
      • Remember late submission = 0 marks!
    • Coming Next Research Techniques and Tools