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VC M&E Module 2 - Develop or Review Your Causal Model
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VC M&E Module 2 - Develop or Review Your Causal Model

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  • -Explain pg. 14 of ME guide (differences btwn the 2 and why causal model is necessary)
  • By engaging others in the causal model development or review process you will ensure that everyone sees the project through a similar lens. This is a critical component of the learning environment that value chain projects need in order to succeed.
  • -Explain the domains from pg. 16 of the ME guide
  • Explain that this is a very basic example and that a case example is coming up. After these areas are outlined, causal pathways must be ID’d by design teams.
  • Questions to ask:Is the project goal and purpose still aligned with your initial intention? Is the causal model thorough, logical and realistic, showing as far as possible how the selected interventions will create significant impact? Are the solutions tailored to the constraints faced by project enterprises in reaching identified markets? Does the sum of interventions or results at each step in the causal pathway logically flow into the achievement of the next? Do we have evidence from our design process to support the linkages all along the causal model? Are there conditions that have not been considered and need to be added as an assumption or a risk? Can we effectively manage the project we are proposing?
  • This effort can both ensure your logic is valid and demonstrate to clients how your thinking has evolved and what you have done with their input.
  • Do you want to integrate the “How to use a causal model to develop a logframe” into the presentation?

Transcript

  • 1. VALUE CHAIN MONITORING AND EVALUATION GUIDEMODULE2 Developing, Reviewing and Refining Your Causal Model
  • 2. GETTING STARTED1May 22, 2012
  • 3. GETTING STARTED2May 22, 2012
  • 4. GETTING STARTED3May 22, 2012
  • 5. MATERIALS / INPUTS RECOMMENDED DOCUMENTS PEOPLE• Goal and Purpose • Field Staff Statements • Project Manager• Master Problem Tree• Sustainable Solutions • Program Managers Table • Key Partner Staff• Interventions Table • Possibly Partners• Risk Manager 4 ***IF YOU ALREADY HAVE A CAUSAL MODEL, SKIP TO May 22, 2012 STEP 3.***
  • 6. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE • STRUCTURE YOUR CAUSAL 1 MODEL • DRAW YOUR CAUSAL MODEL 2 • VERIFY CAUSAL PATHWAYS 3 AND FINALIZE CAUSAL MODEL • DOCUMENT YOUR WORK 45May 22, 2012
  • 7. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 1Causal Models aredeliberately flexible inorder to accommodate a IMPACT LEVELwide range of potential Householdprojects and interventions. DomainThe model establishes 4domains of impact: Sector Domain OUTCOME LEVEL Women’s Empowerme Enterprise nt and Domain Gender 6 Equity May 22, 2012 Domain
  • 8. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 1From bottom to the top, your causal modelshould be designed to present the followinginformation: Underlying assumptions Interventions Outputs Leading outcomes Lagging outcomes 7 Impacts May 22, 2012
  • 9. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 1 TIPS FOR STEP 1In developing causal models, teams should focuson ensuring the model is detailed, logical andrealistic and that the final product provides a clearsummary of the project’s intent and expectationsfor change.8May 22, 2012
  • 10. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE • STRUCTURE YOUR CAUSAL MODEL 1 • DRAW YOUR CAUSAL MODEL 2 • VERIFY CAUSAL PATHWAYS AND 3 FINALIZE CAUSAL MODEL • DOCUMENT YOUR WORK 49May 22, 2012
  • 11. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 2 Purpose and Goal Statements Assumption Assumption Intervention Intervention Outcome Outcome10May 22, 2012
  • 12. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 2 COMPLETING STEP 2To actually draw your causal model, using flip chartpaper and index cards or post-it notes is typically agood approach as you will likely make manychanges. Once you’ve figured out the format anyof the following programs can be used to create aformal design:11May 22, 2012
  • 13. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 2 FINAL PRODUCT12May 22, 2012
  • 14. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE • STRUCTURE YOUR CAUSAL 1 MODEL • DRAW YOUR CAUSAL MODEL 2 • VERIFY CAUSAL PATHWAYS 3 AND FINALIZE CAUSAL MODEL • DOCUMENT YOUR WORK 413May 22, 2012
  • 15. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 3 At this stage, take a step back and review the causal model as a whole.14May 22, 2012
  • 16. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 2 Verifying Your Model Reengage with clients that have fed into the project design process. Engage potential project participants in your design process.15May 22, 2012
  • 17. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE • STRUCTURE YOUR CAUSAL 1 MODEL • DRAW YOUR CAUSAL MODEL 2 • VERIFY CAUSAL PATHWAYS 3 AND FINALIZE CAUSAL MODEL • DOCUMENT YOUR WORK 416May 22, 2012
  • 18. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: STEP 4 Finalize and Develop a Formal Version of Your Causal Model17May 22, 2012
  • 19. STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: Goal Achievement STEP 4 IMPACTS Purpose Cross Cutting/Gender Equity/ Women’s Empowerment Outcomes Direct Enterprise-Level Outcomes Indirect Sector-Level Outcomes AchievementLaggingOutcomesLeadingOutcomes Outputs Interventions 18 May 22, 2012
  • 20. COMMON PITFALLS Allowing important issues or anticipated results to ‘fall off’ the model. Being inflexible or forcing teams to adopt any particular model will undermine this exercise.19May 22, 2012
  • 21. TEMPLATES AND SUPPORTINGMATERIALS COMPARISONS BETWEEN TERMINOLOGIES OF DIFFERENT DONOR AGENCIES for RESULTS / LOGICAL FRAMEWORKS Ultimate Impact End Intermediate Outputs Interventions Outcomes OutcomesNeeds-based Higher Consequence Specific Cause Solution Process Inputs ProblemCARE Program Impact Project Effects Outputs Activities Inputsterminology ImpactCARE logframe Program Goal Project Intermediate Outputs Activities Inputs Final Goal ObjectivesMEDA logframe Goal / Impact Project Purpose / Outcomes Outputs Resources (inputs / activities)PC/LogFrame Goal Purpose Outputs ActivitiesUSAID Results Strategic Objective Intermediate Results Outputs Activities InputsFrameworkUSAID Logframe Final Strategic Goal/ Intermediate results Activities 202E Goal ObjectiveDANIDA + DfID Goal Purpose Outputs ActivitiesCIDA + GTZ Overall goal Project purpose Results/outputs Activities InputsEuropean Union Overall Objective Project Results Activities Purpos eFAO + UNDP + Development Objective Immediate Objectives Outputs Activities InputsNORADUNHCR Sector Objective Goal Project Objective Outputs Activities Input/Resourc esWorld Bank Long-term Objectives Short-term Objectives Outputs InputsAusAID 20 Scheme Goal Major Development Outputs Activities Inputs May 22, 2012 ObjectivesValue Chain Causal Goal Lagging Leading Outputs InterventionsModel Outcome Outcomes
  • 22. QUESTIONS ? COMMENTS ?21May 22, 2012
  • 23. Want to Learn More?Multiple ways to continue the discussion and continue learning:• Initiate a monthly session on the M&E guide and case studies from across CARE. Contact cpennotti@care.org• Join the Market Engagement Community of Practice on LinkedIn.• Join a task force to review and refine the universal 22 indicators. Contact nardi@careinternational.org May 22, 2012