Western European Study Group IU Bloomington

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Talk for public school educators about using "folk" musics in the foreign-language classroom

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  • You know there's awful lot to be said about this Irish traditional folk music and folk lore, because first of all, you have to learn it, and first you must learn the talk, and then you must learn the grip, and after that you must learn the truckly how, and then you have the whole lot, only just to keep on practicing it. Because Seamus Ennis knows far more about this than even the old folk lordy lordy themselves, because Seamus Ennis once met a little leprechauny truckly how, At the bottom of the garden path And at the gate that came up after that in the limeretty limeretty hill huckers, Long before the earthean throw, Long before the leprechaun erean, and long before the argy forrey, and that was in the deep pond doon, before the emerald isle was dropped 'blucck' in the water.
  • Musician, musicologist, teacher, director of VMC
  • Why choose this term, and what all does it mean?
  • Drawn from my own experience and repertoires, but premises would hold
  • Belle je m'en vais en Allemagne, Oh ma mignonne y venez-vous ? - Oh que nenni, je n'y vais pas; Car tout garçon qui part pour la guerre N'en revient pas. Quand vous serez sur ces montagnes Vous n'y penserez plus à moi: Vous verrez l'un' , puis vous verrez l'autre, Et vous perdrez la souvenancev Du temps passé. - Bell' je ferai faire une image A la ressemblance de vous J' la bais'rai tant, puis l'embrass'rai tant Pour conserver la souvenance De notre temps. - Mais que diront tes camarades Te voyant baiser du papier ? - Je leur dirai : c'est le portrait, C'est le portrait de ma mignonne Du temps passé. - Tu ne baiseras pas mon image En Allemagne pendant sept ans. Auprès de moi, tu resteras; Car tout garçon qui part pour la guerre N'en revient pas.
  • What I teach, where I teach, who I teach
  • Recognizing that post-literate classroom students share some key weaknesses—and strengths —with pre -literate learners.
  • Metaphor, folklore, folk wisdom There were three men came out of the west Their fortunes for to try, And these three men made a solemn vow John Barleycorn must die. They've ploughed, they've sown, they've harrowed him in Threw clods upon his head, And these three men made a solemn vow John Barleycorn was dead. They let him lie for a very long time Till the rains from Heaven did fall, And little Sir John sprung up his head And so amazed them all. They've let him stand till Midsummer's day, Till he looked both pale and wan. And little Sir John's grown a long, long beard And so become a man. They've hired men with the scythes so sharp, To cut him off at the knee, They've rolled him and tied him by the waist, Serving him most barbarously. They've hired men with the sharp pitchforks, Who pricked him through the heart And the loader, he has served him worse than that, For he's bound him to the cart. They've wheeled him around and around a field, Till they came unto a barn, And there they made a solemn oath On poor John Barleycorn They've hired men with the crab-tree sticks, To cut him skin from bone, And the miller, he has served him worse than that, For he's ground him between two stones. And little Sir John and the nut brown bowl And his brandy in the glass And little Sir John and the nut brown bowl Proved the strongest man at last The huntsman, he can't hunt the fox Nor so loudly to blow his horn, And the tinker, he can't mend kettle nor pots without a little barley corn
  • [Cite past publications and research; practical hands-on training, ways in which teaching outside the classroom and according to oral/aural methods have been brought back into the classroom.]
  • That the ancient wisdom and oral/aural/vernacular traditions had their own literatures .
  • Don Niperi Septoe
  • That, like more prose/observation/literary traditions, those literatures effectively and precisely conveyed that information which the tradition itself believes to be essential.
  • History, locality, personal autobiography It oft-times has been told, that the British seamen bold Could flog the tars of France so neat and handy, Oh! But they never met their match, till the Yankees did them catch Oh, the Yankee boys for fighting are the dandy, Oh. The Guerriere, a frigate bold, on the foaming ocean rolled Commanded by proud Dacres, the grandee, Oh! With as choice a British crew as ever a rammer drew Could flog the Frenchmen two to one so handy, Oh! When the frigate hove in view, says proud Dacres to his crew, "Come clear the ship for action and be handy, Oh! To the weather-gage, boys, get her." And to make his men fight better Gave them to drink, gunpowder mixed with brandy, Oh! Then Dacres loudly cries, "Make this Yankee ship your prize, You can in thirty minutes, neat and handy, Oh! Twenty-five's enough, I'm sure, and if you'll do it in a score I'll treat you to a double share of brandy, Oh!" The British shot flew hot, Which the Yankees answered not Till they got within the distrance they called handy, Oh! "Now," says Hull unto his crew, "Let us see what we can do, If we take this boasting Briton we're the dandy, Oh!" The first broadside we poured carried her mainmast by the board Which made this lofty frigate look abandoned, Oh! Then Dacres shook his head, and to his officers said, "Lord! I didn't think those Yankees were so handy, Oh!" Our secon told so well that their fore and mizzen fell, Which doused the royal ensign neat and handy, Oh! "By George!" says he, "We're done!" And they fired a lee gun While the Yankees struck up Yankee Doodle Dandy, Oh! Then Dacres came on board to deliver up his sword. Tho'loth was he to part with it, it was so handy, Oh! "Oh! Keep your sword," says Hull, "For it only makes you dull, Cheer up, and let us have a little brandy, Oh! Now, fill your glasses full, and we'll drink to captain hull And so merrily we'll push around the brandy, Oh! Johnny Bull may boast his fill, let the world say what it will, The Yankee boys for fighting are the dandy, Oh!
  • That, particularly in the teaching of those exact traditions and given their longevity, it would be arrogant not to pay attention to those literatures
  • Oh! the French are on the sea," says the Sean van Vocht, "Oh! the French are on the sea," says the Sean van Vocht, "The French are in the Bay, they'll be here at break of day, And the Orange will decay," says the Sean van Vocht, "And the Orange will decay," says the Sean van Vocht. "And where will they have their camp?" says the Sean van Vocht, "And where will they have their camp?" says the Sean van Vocht. "On the Curragh of Kildare and the boys will all be there With their pikes in good repair." says the Sean van Vocht, "With their pikes in good repair." says the Sean van Vocht "And what will the yeomen do?" says the Sean van Vocht, "And what will the yeomen do?" says the Sean van Vocht, "What will the yeomen do but throw off the red and blue, And swear they will be true to the Sean van Vocht? And swear they will be true to the Sean van Vocht?" "Then what colour will be seen?" says the Sean van Vocht, "Then what colour will be seen?" says the Sean van Vocht, "What colour should be seen where our fathers' homes have been But our own immortal green? " says the Sean van Vocht, "But our own immortal green? " says the Sean van Vocht. "Will old Ireland then be free? " says the Sean van Vocht, "Will old Ireland then be free? " says the Sean van Vocht, "Old Ireland shall be free from the centre to the sea; Then hurrah for liberty," says the Sean van Vocht.
  • That these literatures may provide relevant insights into teaching in very different cultural/historical contexts, and even in other topic areas. These modes of teaching were employed, not only for the “fine arts,” but also for history, medicine, law, theology, and so on.
  • History, protest, literature, untold sto c. 1649, Anon. 1 You noble Diggers all, stand up now, stand up now, You noble Diggers all, stand up now; The waste land to maintain, seeing Cavaliers by name Your digging do disdain, and persons all defame. Stand up now, stand up now. 2 Your houses they pull down, stand up now, stand up now, Your houses they pull down, stand up now; Your houses they pull down to fright poor men in town, But the Gentry must come down, and the poor shall wear the crown. Stand up now, Diggers all! 3 With spades and hoes and plowes, stand up now, stand up now, With spades and hoes and plowes, stand up now; Your freedom to uphold, seeing Cavaliers are bold To kill you if they could, and rights from you withhold. Stand up now, Diggers all! 4 Their self-will is their law, stand up now, stand up now, Their self-will is their law, stand up now; Since tyranny came in, they count it now no sin To make a goal a gin, to starve poor men therein. Stand up now, stand up now. 5 The Gentry are all round, stand up now, stand up now, The Gentry are all round, stand up now; The Gentry are all round, on each side they are found, Their wisdom's so profound to cheat us of our ground. Stand up now, stand up now. 6 The Lawyers they conjoin, stand up now, stand up now, The Lawyers they conjoin, stand up now; To arrest you they advise, such fury they devise, The devil in them lies, and hath blinded both their eyes. Stand up now, stand up now. 7 The Clergy they come in, stand up now, stand up now, The Clergy they come in, stand up now; The Clergy they come in, and say it is a sin That we should now begin our freedom for to win. Stand up now, Diggers all! 8 The tithes they yet will have, stand up now, stand up now, The tithes they yet will have, stand up now; The tithes they yet will have, and Lawyers their fees crave, And this they say is brave, to make the poor their slave. Stand up now, Diggers all! 9 'Gainst Lawyers and 'gainst Priests, stand up now, stand up now, 'Gainst Lawyers and 'gainst Priests, stand up now; For tyrants they are both, even flat against their oath, To grant us they are loathm free meat and drink and cloth. Stand up now, Diggers all! 10 The Club is all their law, stand up now, stand up now, The club is all their law, stand up now; The clup is all their law, to keep poor men in awe; But they no vision saw to maintain such a law. Stand up now, Diggers all! 11 The Cavaliers are foes, stand up now, stand up now, The Cavaliers are foes, stand up now; The Cavaliers are foes, themselves to disclose By verses, not in prose, to please the singing boys. Stand up now, Diggers all! 12 To conquer them by love, come in now, come in now, To conquer them by love, come in now; To conquer them by love, as it does you behove, For He is King above, no Power is like to Love. Glory here, Diggers all!ries
  • Interactivity results not only from the topic , but also from pedagogical mindset .
  • Tunes suitable for dancing the threes and sevens
  • That student learning modes change; that contemporary students are particularly enculturated toward an essentially post-textual, visual, patterning, observation/imitation cognitive landscape.
  • Likewise, vernacular learning depends upon modeling: “read one, see one, do one.”
  • Se do bheatha, a bhean ba leanmhar B'e ar gcreach tu bheith i ngeibhinn Do dhuiche bhrea i seilbh meirleach 'S tu diolta leis na ghallaibh Welcome, lady of great sorrow. We share the grief of your internment, Your fair land in the hands of brigands And you in bondage to strangers. Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Now the summer is coming. Ta grannie mhoal ag teacht thar saile Oglaigh armtha lei mar gharda Gaeil iad fein is ni gaill na spainnigh Is cuirfidh ruaig ar ghallaibh Grannie mhoal (Grace O'Malley) will cross the ocean With armed warriors as her guard. Gaels are they, not French nor Spaniards. They will overwhelm to the foreigners. Oro... A bhui le ri na bhfeart go bhfeiceam Muna mbeam beo ina dhiaidh ach seachtain Grannie mhoal agus mile gaiscioch Ag fogairt fain ar ghallaibh Thank Heaven's King that we shall see Even though we die soon after (the next week). Grannie Mhoal and a thousand warriors Herald the stranger's retreat Oro...
  • Strong at assimilation, subjective interpretation, “deep-reading,” visual sources, “collage”
  • Weak at synthesis, understanding differing experiential perspectives, structural understanding, texts, linear progression
  • You scholars of English one question I'll ask To answer you won't find a difficult task Of Shakespeare's great heroes, which one would you pick To award him first prize for being totally thick Othello you know was a gullible dupe And Hamlet's delaying landed him in the soup But the stupidest moron in all of Shakespeare Was that old King of England, the man they call Lear   Three daughters he had in the course of his life Although we're not told what befell his poor wife I'll bet she ran off to avoid going insane After years of enduring that pompous oul pain At the Donkey and Crown where he drank every night The locals all knew poor old Lear wasn't bright When they said your "Royal Highness we love and revere" The oul fool lapped it up and bought everyone beer   At the age of four-score and in fear of expiring King Lear told his girls he intended retiring Of loss of his faculties sadly he moaned As if he could forfeit what he'd never owned He said that his kingdom he planned to partition Provided his daughters fulfilled one condition "Before I hand over this rich legacy You must tell me how much you admire me," said he   Now the two eldest daughters named Goneril and Regan Knew well what he wanted, so promptly they began To swear how they always did love and respect him They thought that the sun rose each day from his rectum Says Cordelia the youngest, being honest and true "Can't you see Da they're taking the piss out of you" King Lear lost the head and began to scream at her But still she refused her oul father to flatter   Then says the bould Lear, "I swear on my honor I'll split my estate between Regan and Goneril I've nothing for Delia, not land nor finance She can pack her belongings and shag off to France" If that wasn't enough that pathetic oul jerk Left himself without home, without income or perk The two vixens took all and their Da the oul dunce Was to lodge in their houses in alternate months   These daughters of course were both nasty oul shrews But in fairness King Lear gave them every excuse His boiled eggs were too hard or his gravy too thin Or he got too much tonic and not enough gin So they both found their Dad an unbearable bore Ere the first month was over they showed him the door In those far-off days there was no county home So ould Lear like a tramp 'round the country did roam   Up to this he was lacking in guile and in craft But now the old geezer went totally daft He ran through the fields and he crawled through the bogs He was screaming and howling and barking at dogs But in spite of his faults and ridiculous foibles He still had a band of devoted disciples Young Edgar was there and the loyal Duke of Kent And a man called 'the fool', quite a sensible gent   One other wayfarer I'll add to this roster Twas Edgar's blind father, the old Duke of Gloucester He disowned his son who he thought was untrue In fact Lear and himself were of equal IQ Then they heard the news as they wandered all over Cordelia arrived off the ferry in Dover Being now Queen of France she assembled an army Avenging her Da though she heard he was barmy   So thousands of men in the battle were slaughtered And victory it went to the two vicious daughters But they never got to be powerful and rich Overcome as they were by a lecherous itch For Edgar's half-brother they both wished to own The same man for the power of his pelvis was known So one of them poisoned the other one's lager Then did herself in with a seven-inch dagger   Since tragedies must have their audiences crying There followed a terrible outbreak of dying Edgar stabbed his half-brother, that devious oul crook And the shock killed his Daddy, that's Gloucester's oul Duke Cordelia was hanged by a treacherous jailer Lear died when it struck him that he was a failure If he only had snuffed it a few years before He'd have saved everybody all this suffering and gore
  • OOR HAMLET (Adam McNaughtan) There was this king nodding In his garden all alane When his brither in his ear dropped A wee tait of henbane Then he stole his brother's crown And his money and his widow But the dead king walked and got his son And said,"Now listen, kiddo I've been killed and it's your duty To take revenge on Claudius Kill him quick and clean and show The nation what a fraud he is The boy says, "Right, I'll do it But I'll have to play it crafty So that nobody will suspect me I'll kid on that I'm a dafty So wi all except Horatio (and he trusts him as a friend) Hamlet - that's the kid He kids on he's round the bend And because he's not yet willing For obligatory killing He tried to make his uncle think He's tuppence off the shilling Took the mickey oot Polonius Treated poor Ophelia vile And told Rosencrantz and Gildenstern that Denmark's blooded bile Then a troup of traveling actors Like the 784 Arrived to do a special one night Gig in Elsinore Hamlet, Hamlet, acting balmy Hamlet, Hamlet, loves his mommy Hamlet, Hamlet, hesitating Wonders if the ghost's a fake And that is why he's waiting Then Hamlet wrote a scene for The players to enact While Horatio and him would watch To see if Claudius cracked The play was called "the Mousetrap" (not the one that's running noo) And sure enough, the King walked out Before the scene was through. So Hamlet's got the proof that Claudius Gived his dad the dose The only problem being now that Claudius knows he knows So while Hamlet tells his ma that her New husband's not a fit man Uncle Claud puts out a contract with The English king as hit man Then when Hamlet killed Polonius The concealed corpus delecti Was the King's excuse to send for An English hempen necktie With Rosencrantz and Gildenstern To make sure he got there But Hamlet jumped the boat and put The finger straight on that pair Meanwhile Laertes heard his dad had been Stabbed thru the arras He came racing back to Elsinore Toute-suite, Hot foot from Paris And Ophelia with her dad killed by The man she wished to marry After saying it with flowers She commited hari-kari Hamlet, Hamlet, there's no messin' Hamlet, Hamlet, Learned his lesson Hamlet, Hamlet, Yorick's crust Convinced him that men, good or bad, At last must come to dust Then Laertes lost the place and was Demanding retribution But the king said, keep the head and I'll provide you a solution And he arranged a sword-fight with The interested parties With a blunted sword for Hamlet and A sharp sword for Laertes And to make things double sure The old belt and braces line He fixed up a poison sword tip and A poisoned cup of wine And the poisoned sword got Hamlet But Laertes went and muffed it Cause he got stabbed himself and he Confessed before he snuffed it Then Hamlet's mummy drank the wine and As her face turned blue Hamlet says, "I quite believe The King's a baddy through and through Incestuous, treacherous, damned Dane He said, to be precise, And made up for hesitating by Killing Claudius twice He stabbed him with the sword and forced The wine between his lips Then he said, the rest is silence And he cashed in all his chips They fired a volley over him that Shook the topmost rafter And then Fortinbras, knee-deep in Danes Lived happily ever after Hamlet, Hamlet, end of story Hamlet, Hamlet, very gory Hamlet, Hamlet, I'm away If you think this is boring You should read the bloody play Copyright Adam McNaughtan
  • That we might find it fruitful to employ more nuanced and supple paradigms for “literacy”; that as teachers we might benefit by exploiting “new” literacies even as we consider remediation to teach “old” ones.
  • That, given the very long history of these methods’ applicability in pre-literate cultures, students can still respond viscerally or intuitively even in the absence of prior experience with them.
  • e.g. “Once upon a time…”
  • Patterns and their power :
  • Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans     Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you Cuirfidh mé suas chuig Sadhbh Sheáin thú I'll send you up to Sadhbh Sheáin's Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you 'S cuirfidh sí buairthín sa ngleann ort And she will put a spancel on you in the glen Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you Cuirfidh mé suas chuig Sadhbh Sheáin thú I'll send you up to Sadhbh Sheáin's Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you 'S cuirfidh sí buairthín sa ngleann ort And she will put a spancel on you in the glen     Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans     Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you Cuirfidh mé suas chuig Sadhbh Sheáin thú I'll send you up to Sadhbh Sheáin's Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you 'S cuirfidh sí buairthín sa ngleann ort And she will put a spancel on you in the glen Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you Cuirfidh mé suas chuig Sadhbh Sheáin thú I'll send you up to Sadhbh Sheáin's Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé I'll send you, I'll send you, I'll send you 'S cuirfidh sí buairthín sa ngleann ort And she will put a spancel on you in the glen
  • Oral literature & the vernacular memory employ and depend upon patterns, templates, and consistent procedures. Alfred Lord’s insights regarding Homeric epic based upon observation of Bulgarian singers ( The Singer of Tales ).
  • Emigration, diaspora, exile
  • This modeling can be extended to teach thought processes, problem-solving, modes of interaction, critical thinking, and personal conduct. And typically all at the same time .
  • The power of narrative arcs (chronological or otherwise): “Let me tell you a story”
  • In teaching any cultural expression, context reveals content—content reveals context;
  • Western European Study Group IU Bloomington

    1. 1. Vernacular literatures in the (post-)/(multi-)literate classroom “ A Homeland of the Mind” Incorporating Culture in the Language Classroom: Exploring Cultural Identity through Music Indiana University Bloomington, June 2009 Dr Christopher Smith, Associate Professor & Chair of Musicology; Director: Vernacular Music Center & TTU Celtic Ensemble Texas Tech School of Music - christopher.smith@ttu.edu http://ttuvmc.org
    2. 2. Seamus Ennis: “The Grip”
    3. 3. Disclaimer!
    4. 4. VMC
    5. 5. “ Vernacular”?
    6. 6. Example: Message: Trust your own performance skills
    7. 7. Belle je me’en vais en Allemagne
    8. 8. What, where, and who?
    9. 9. Pre- versus post-literacy One key insight
    10. 10. John Barleycorn
    11. 11. The world, the classroom, & the body that links them One key insight
    12. 12. An dro: Garcon a marier
    13. 13. Intuition 1 Vernacular literatures
    14. 14. Seamus Ennis: Don Niperi Septo
    15. 15. Intuition 2 Those literatures’ precision
    16. 16. The Constitution and the Guerriere The Constitution and the Guerriere
    17. 17. Intuition 3 Paying attention to these literatures
    18. 18. The Shan Van Vocht
    19. 19. Intuition 4 Relevance beyond the ancient
    20. 20. Gerrard Winstanley (1609-76): You Noble Diggers All
    21. 21. Premise Topics versus mindsets
    22. 22. The Threes… and Sevens…
    23. 23. Premise Learning modes, ancient & post-modern
    24. 24. Patterns & their power “ Read one, see one, do one.”
    25. 25. Example: the power of the drone: Óró Sé Do Bheatha Abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Oro, se do bheatha abhaile Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Oh, welcome home. Now the summer is coming Grannie mhoal (Grace O'Malley) will cross the ocean With armed warriors as her guard. Gaels are they, not French nor Spaniards. They will overwhelm to the foreigners. Oro... Thank Heaven's King that we shall see Even though we die soon after (the next week). Grannie Mhoal and a thousand warriors Herald the stranger's retreat Oro…
    26. 26. Premise Students: strengths Example: Iconography
    27. 27. “ Farmer Giles & his wife shewing off their daughter Betty to their neighbours, on her return from school” --James Gilray, 1809
    28. 28. Premise Students: handicaps
    29. 29. You scholars of English one question I'll ask To answer you won't find a difficult task Of Shakespeare's great heroes,/ which one would you pick To award him first prize for being totally thick Othello you know was a gullible dupe And Hamlet's delaying landed him in the soup But the stupidest moron in all of Shakespeare Was that old King of England, the man they call Lear   Three daughters he had in the course of his life Although we're not told what befell his poor wife I'll bet she ran off to avoid going insane After years of enduring that pompous oul pain At the Donkey and Crown where he drank every night The locals all knew poor old Lear wasn't bright When they said your "Royal Highness we love and revere" The oul fool lapped it up and bought everyone beer   a ACT I. Scene I.   Enter Kent, Gloucester, and Edmund   … Glou. Sir, this young fellow's mother could; whereupon she grew round-womb'd, and had indeed, sir, a son for her cradle ere she had a husband for her bed. Do you smell a fault? Kent. I cannot wish the fault undone, the issue of it being so proper.   Glou. But I have, sir, a son by order of law, some year elder than this, who yet is no dearer in my account. Though this knave came something saucily into the world before he was sent for, yet was his mother fair, there was good sport at his making, and the whoreson must be acknowledged.
    30. 30. OOR HAMLET (Adam McNaughtan) There was this king nodding In his garden all alane When his brither in his ear dropped A wee tait of henbane Then he stole his brother's crown And his money and his widow But the dead king walked and got his son And said,"Now listen, kiddo I've been killed and it's your duty To take revenge on Claudius Kill him quick and clean and show The nation what a fraud he is The boy says, "Right, I'll do it But I'll have to play it crafty So that nobody will suspect me I'll kid on that I'm a dafty
    31. 31. Premise “ New” literacies
    32. 32. Premise Visceral/intuitive
    33. 33. Breton bourees
    34. 34. “ Once upon a time…” Premise
    35. 35. Patterns & their power
    36. 36. Na Ceannabhain Bhana Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Goirim fhéin Micil 's Máire I myself applaud Micil and Máire Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin I myself applaud, I myself applaud, I myself applaud Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána The little fair canavans
    37. 37. Patterns & their power Memory, orality, recall
    38. 38. Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore
    39. 39. Patterns & their power Extending this use
    40. 40. Patterns & their power “ Let me tell you a story…”
    41. 41. Patterns & their power Context & content & their interplay
    42. 42. Thank you!
    43. 43. Participation
    44. 44. “ party pieces”
    45. 45. Making rather than buying
    46. 46. Finding your own repertoires to teach the concepts you want to teach
    47. 47. Music as a medium, language as another
    48. 48. Ethics, values, history, critical reading/listening/speaking/thinking
    49. 49. Multi-generational communication
    50. 50. Skills versus data
    51. 51. Modeling desired modes
    52. 52. Expert musicianship is not the issue; most of these musics were originally intended for participation

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