Taking notes

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Brief presentation used to explain the differences between types of notetaking for High School students: Direct Quotes, Paraphrasing, and Summary and how to use Noodletools to help take notes.

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Taking notes

  1. 1. Taking Notes The devil is in the details…
  2. 2. Can’t I just highlight stuff?  Nope.  You’ll make the librarians very crabby.  You will suffer back injuries from carrying everything around.  The computer will eat your file.  You will run out of room on your desk.
  3. 3. Seriously,  Keep everything!!!  Good note taking saves a TREMENDOUS amount of time.  Getting the citation info the first time saves headaches.  Resources have a way of coming back to bite you —take your notes seriously.
  4. 4. Notetaking helps you avoid plagiarism  Helps figure out which ideas are  Original  From the research  Keeps ideas organized  Who said what and from where is documented  Gives other people proper credit  For paraphrases and summaries too  Helps you cite the sources you use  Even for images
  5. 5. What is “good note taking”?  You can look back after a week and still know what you were talking about.  It said that the situation was muddled  Coulter clearly states, “The liberal faction…”  Includes:  Facts,  Statistics,  Paraphrases  Summaries  Personal ideas
  6. 6. Self-assessment checklist Along the way review your writing  Ask yourself: Have I…  Documented all my sources?  Answered my information needs?  Supported my conclusions?  Forgotten anything?
  7. 7. Strategies in Notetaking Personal Thinking Blending source materials in with your own thoughts— making sure your own voice is heard.
  8. 8. Before taking notes RATE the source  Is this Relevant to my focus?  On what Authority is this based?  Have I already Taken this? What’s new?  Do I need Everything or just part?
  9. 9. Quotes, Paraphrases, and Summaries—an overview As Panno’s essay explains, scientists are hoping pig hearts could save human lives. Sum up the main idea in one sentence. Think “key point”. For overview of information or in general support of an assertion Getting the big idea from a source into a sentence 15 words or less. Summary It currently isn’t possible for pig’s hearts to be in humans, but if science can do more engineering (Panno 825-6) then a human body may not know the donor is a pig. Read the source and put it into your own words. DON’T change meaning! Most often because it keeps your paper from sounding like a mish-mash of voices. Re-writing a resource in your own words (2-4 sentences) Paraphrase And as the same author states, “it may be possible to genetically engineer donor pigs so they lack the glycosyltransferases that produce the cell-surface antigens.” (Panno 825-6). Put it in quotations and write down the source EXACTLY as it’s written. An exceptional insight or definitions that can’t be changed Exact word-for- word statement from a source. Quote What does it look like in-text? How do I do it? When do you use it? What is it? Abilock http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/ethical/catandmouse2.pdf
  10. 10. NoodleBib Notecard Components  Title  Source  Piles  URL  Pages  Tags  Existing Tags  Direct Quotation  Paraphrase  My Ideas
  11. 11. Quotation Tied to a bibliographic citation (!)  Exact passage from print or digital source  Prompts for page and paragraph  Or URL for digital sources  Can cut and paste if digital.
  12. 12. Direct Quotes  Use a good turn of phrase  Use the essential statement  Use a quote from an expert  Use an image  Offer an opposing thought  Use quotation marks and attributions,  According to Tomlinson, “People without scars lead boring lives.”
  13. 13. Quote from…  Primary Sources  To draw on wisdom of original author  Use the precise words of the author  Copy exact lines of a piece of literature (poem, essay, drama, fiction)  To reproduce graphs, charts and statistical data.  Secondary Sources  To further discussion or explain complex material  To make your own point especially if furthers the original quote.  To display excellence in ideas and expression by experts on the topic  Overuse shows lack of focus, inadequate evidence-use these sparingly  Pictures / Images
  14. 14. Example of a Quotation
  15. 15. “Paraphrase”  As valuable as a Direct Quote!  Lets you discuss KEY IDEAS from a text.  Puts ideas in context of the larger text.  Often summarize more than is quoted  Can have Summary sentences mixed in  Keeps the VOICE of the paper YOUR OWN.
  16. 16. Word-substitution IS NOT paraphrasing  Use a thesaurus to fine-tune language during the writing of a draft, NOT during notetaking!  WordNet  Visual Thesaurus
  17. 17. The Paraphrase  Someone else’s IDEAS, but in your own words.  A difficult but important skill  Worth the practice  Keep the Direct Quote near to make sure you really are using your own words.  Still needs to be cited IN the paper.
  18. 18. Example of Paraphrase
  19. 19. To paraphrase well, you must  Understand what you are reading  Extract the key points  “Explain what the author believes.”  Mark or extract important words and ideas  Identify details or evidence that support the author’s thesis  Evaluate the Fit  How does it compare with what you already learned or know?  What conclusions can you draw?
  20. 20. Quotes, Paraphrases, and Summaries—an overview As Panno’s essay explains, scientists are hoping pig hearts could save human lives. Sum up the main idea in one sentence. Think “key point”. For overview of information or in general support of an assertion Getting the big idea from a source into a sentence 15 words or less. Summary It currently isn’t possible for pig’s hearts to be in humans, but if science can do more engineering (Panno 825-6) then a human body may not know the donor is a pig. Read the source and put it into your own words. DON’T change meaning! Most often because it keeps your paper from sounding like a mish-mash of voices. Re-writing a resource in your own words (2-4 sentences) Paraphrase And as the same author states, “it may be possible to genetically engineer donor pigs so they lack the glycosyltransferases that produce the cell-surface antigens.” (Panno 825-6). Put it in quotations and write down the source EXACTLY as it’s written. An exceptional insight or definitions that can’t be changed Exact word-for- word statement from a source. Quote What does it look like in-text? How do I do it? When do you use it? What is it? Abilock & Geiger 11/16/04, rev. 09/09/05, rev Abilock & Smith 3/1/07
  21. 21. The “My Ideas” field  Questions?  Does it fit with what I know?  Does it represent a different perspective?  Do I agree?  What is important about this passage or source?
  22. 22. Take Personal Notes  Record your discoveries  Hmm, that’s interesting…  Reflect on findings  Well, what would happen if…  Make connections  That doesn’t make sense when compared to…  Identify prevailing views and patterns of thought  Most of the lit seems to suggest…
  23. 23. Make connections  To use as a notepad.  Find an image for this  Identify area of confusion.  Find out what ‘hedgerow’ looks like  Pinpoint a big idea.  Competing values –trust v. organic  Use the “My Ideas” field in whatever way WORKS for YOU!
  24. 24. Formatting options let you mark elements of your notes & interact according to your needs
  25. 25. “Tags” field  Keywords or concepts  Conflicting information  (e.g., “climateVfungus”)  Comparing trends  (e.g., regions)  Controlled vocabulary  Relate notes to main topic  Understand the key categories or issues
  26. 26. “Notecard Tabletop”  Virtual ORGANIZING  Allows you to see all the notes in one place and decide how they work together  Flexible  Sub-topics  Section headings  Issues  Categories  Quick view of notes you made  Group Notecards into PILES  Bridge to outline or concept map
  27. 27. “Outline”  Organize your Ideas  Put similar notecards into “Piles”  Drag notecards into the Outline area that makes sense  Printing Outline prints notecard information into the Outline.
  28. 28. Self-assessment checklist Along the way review your writing  Ask yourself: Have I…  Documented all my sources?  Answered my information needs?  Supported my conclusions?  Forgotten anything?
  29. 29. Big ideas of notes  Notes are my thinking tools, to help ME  All researchers have feelings of being overwhelmed during notetaking  Note taking is a process of understanding, not scribing  Citations document your authority
  30. 30. Student A Student B Student C Student D © Joy McGregor 2004 Good Notetaking Helps Which of these papers is best? Why? http://www.slideshare.net/joymcg/visualising-synthesis
  31. 31.  This slide show was originally created by C. Tomlinson WITCC Adjunct http://www.slideshare.net/ctomlins/taking-notes  Additional elements by D. Abilock, Geiger, and S. Smith http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/ethical/catandmouse2.pdf  Modified by K. Covintree

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