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Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read
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Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read

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This powerpoint addresses literacy in young children with special needs. For teachers, librarians, and other professionals, there are some specific strategies that will be useful in helping these …

This powerpoint addresses literacy in young children with special needs. For teachers, librarians, and other professionals, there are some specific strategies that will be useful in helping these children read. This presentation does not address reading instruction specifically (such as phonics, etc.), but rather, methods that will make it easier for children with certain special needs to read and enjoy reading. Such strategies include the use of available assistive technology, as well as adapted books.

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  • 1. An Introduction to Strategies for Helping Children with Special Needs Read Courtney Fischer University of North Carolina – Greensboro March 2012
  • 2. Dyslexia and Other Learning Disabilities- Dyslexia: often, difficulty in reading; see letters out of order or in reverse- Well-spaced words and clear lettering- Audio books- BookTalker and BookWorm
  • 3. Intellectual andDevelopmental Disabilities - General strategies helpful - Developmentally- appropriate books - Reading together and out loud
  • 4. Motor Skill Impairments - Adapted devices - Electronic readers - Use of Dycem - Bookstands - Computer programs
  • 5. Blindness and Visual Impairments- Braille or large print- Audio books- Book stands and supports- Adequate lighting- Magnifying devices- Screen readers and text scanners- Sensory items added to adapted books
  • 6. Deafness and Hearing Impairments - Hearing aids and amplification devices - Books in American Sign Language (ASL) or Signed English - Video translations
  • 7. Adapted Books- Pre-made versus DIY- Pictures above words- Page-turners- Sensory items- Laminate pages- Scanning a book
  • 8. Available Assistive Technology Recap - BookTalker and BookWorm - iPad and electronic book devices - Glare-reduction screens and magnifiers - Hearing amplifiers - Audio books - Video technology
  • 9. Resources- North Carolina Assistive Technology Program- Focus on Literacy program, of A Brighter Path Foundation in Winston-Salem- Local library systems- Online resources
  • 10. ReferencesBerkeley, S., & Lindstrom, J. H. (2011). Technology for the struggling reader: Free and easily accessible resources. Teaching Exceptional Children, 43(4), 48-55.Darnell, M. (2004). Reading with dyslexia. Retrieved from http://www.creative-writing-solutions.com/reading-with-dyslexia.htmlErickson, K. A., Hatch, P., & Clendon, S. (2010). Literacy, Assistive technology, and students with significant disabilities. Focus On Exceptional Children, 42(5), 1-16.Goldin-Meadow, S., & Mayberry, R. I. (2001). How do profoundly deaf children learn to read? Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 16(4), 222-229.Kirchner, R. (2010). Reading tips for children with dyslexia. Retrieved from http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Reading_Tips_DyslexiaLaurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. (1995). 15 principles for reading to deaf children. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/clerc_center/information_and_resources/info_to_go/language_and_literacy/literacy_at_the_cle rc_center/welcome_to_shared_reading_project/15_principles_for_reading_to_deaf_children.htmlNYC Department of Education. (2012). Adapted books. Retrieved from http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District75/Departments/Literacy/AdaptedBooks/default.htm#arShannon, M. (2006). The A-Z of adapting books for students with disabilities. Retrieved from www.ncatp.org/.../a-z%20of %20adapting%20books.docTurner, N. D., & Traxler, M. (1997). Childrens literature for the primary inclusive classroom: Increasing understanding of children with hearing impairments. American Annals Of The Deaf, 142(5), 350-55.Wopperer, E. (2011). Inclusive literature in the library and the classroom. Knowledge Quest, 39(3), 26-34.

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