Protecting Your ASSets – Intellectual Property<br />Presented by Kirk Cesari<br />CESARI INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW<br />AU...
What is Intellectual Property (IP)?<br />A creative work, invention, idea, or useful information<br />Trademarks<br />Pate...
Intellectual Property Myths<br />Intellectual Property doesn’t matter to my business.<br />I can use the same strategies a...
Why IP matters…<br />You have a business and you have competitors<br />You have a great idea  and you don’t want someone e...
Protect your ASSets<br />Contracts<br />Employment and Independent Contractor Agreements<br />Non-Disclosure Agreements (N...
What can be a Trademark?<br />A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, or design, or a combination thereof, that identifies ...
Trademark FAQs<br />Is registration required?<br />No, but many benefits are provided <br />What can be a trademark?<br />...
What is a Patent?<br /><ul><li>An exclusive right to make, use, or sell
Subject matter for a patent: machine, process, composition of matter, or article of manufacture
U.S. Patent Term –20 years from date of filing
Provisional Patent – establishes a filing data and acts as a 1-year placeholder for the applicant to file a regular (utili...
Why Get Patents?<br /><ul><li>Potential valuable asset
Licensing and royalty potential
Cross-licensing
Documentation of R/D efforts
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Cover your ASSets

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Cover your ASSets

  1. 1. Protecting Your ASSets – Intellectual Property<br />Presented by Kirk Cesari<br />CESARI INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW<br />AUSTIN, TX<br />512-921-9069<br />kcesari@cesari-iplaw.com<br />4/12/2011<br />1<br />
  2. 2. What is Intellectual Property (IP)?<br />A creative work, invention, idea, or useful information<br />Trademarks<br />Patents<br />Copyrights<br />Trade Secrets<br />Confidential Information<br />Examples: company or product names, products, inventions, music, photos, business plans, clients lists … potentially any idea or creative work valuable to your business.<br />4/12/2011<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Intellectual Property Myths<br />Intellectual Property doesn’t matter to my business.<br />I can use the same strategies as some other company is using.<br />Form contracts are great, I just plug in my business name and sign on the line.<br />Software is not patentable.<br />A big law firm can do it all, so I’ll just hire them for everything (self-promoting plug)<br />4/12/2011<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Why IP matters…<br />You have a business and you have competitors<br />You have a great idea and you don’t want someone else to exploit it<br />You are trying to get funding for your start-up<br />What should you do?<br />4/12/2011<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Protect your ASSets<br />Contracts<br />Employment and Independent Contractor Agreements<br />Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs)<br />Exclusivity Agreements, Development Agreements, etc.<br />Trademarks<br />Patents<br />Copyrights<br />Trade Secrets<br />4/12/2011<br />5<br />
  6. 6. What can be a Trademark?<br />A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, or design, or a combination thereof, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others. <br />A service mark is the same as a trademark, except that it identifies and distinguishes the source of a service rather than goods. <br />4/12/2011<br />Page 6<br />
  7. 7. Trademark FAQs<br />Is registration required?<br />No, but many benefits are provided <br />What can be a trademark?<br />A mark that is distinctive –it can identify a source of goods<br />There are four general categories: (1) arbitrary or fanciful, (2) suggestive, (3) descriptive, or (4) generic. <br />The requirements for, and degree of, legal protection will depend upon which category it is in.<br />4/12/2011<br />7<br />
  8. 8. What is a Patent?<br /><ul><li>An exclusive right to make, use, or sell
  9. 9. Subject matter for a patent: machine, process, composition of matter, or article of manufacture
  10. 10. U.S. Patent Term –20 years from date of filing
  11. 11. Provisional Patent – establishes a filing data and acts as a 1-year placeholder for the applicant to file a regular (utility, etc.) patent application</li></ul>4/12/2011<br />Page 8<br />
  12. 12. Why Get Patents?<br /><ul><li>Potential valuable asset
  13. 13. Licensing and royalty potential
  14. 14. Cross-licensing
  15. 15. Documentation of R/D efforts
  16. 16. Ammunition (via counterclaims of infringement)
  17. 17. May cause competitors to have to avoid
  18. 18. Rewards innovation
  19. 19. Protects capital investment</li></ul>4/12/2011<br />Page 9<br />
  20. 20. Copyright Basics<br /><ul><li> A Copyright is secured automatically when an original works of authorship is created.
  21. 21. In the U.S., Federal Registration provides the owner with several advantages
  22. 22. Registration may be made at any time within the life of the copyright
  23. 23. Works made for hire have a duration of 95 years from publication or 120 years from creation, whichever is shorter.</li></ul>4/12/2011<br />Page 10<br />
  24. 24. What is not Copyrightable?<br /><ul><li> Works that have not been fixed in a tangible medium of expression
  25. 25. Titles, Names, Short Phrases, and Slogans; familiar symbols or designs; mere variations of typographical ornamentation, lettering, or coloring; mere listings of ingredients or contents
  26. 26. Ideas, procedures, methods, systems, processes, concepts, principles, discoveries, or devices
  27. 27. Works consisting entirely of information that is common property and containing no original authorship (such as alphabetical white page listings)</li></ul>4/12/2011<br />Page 11<br />
  28. 28. Trade Secrets<br />“…any information, including a formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique, or process, that derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to the public or other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure and use and is subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy.”<br />-Uniform Trade Secrets Act <br />4/12/2011<br />Page 12<br />
  29. 29. Economically Valuable Information <br />May include:<br />“Know-How” information<br />Positive or negative information that could be of potential use<br />Information concerning customers or vendors<br />Pending unpublished patent applications and disclosures<br />Processes or compilations of information<br />4/12/2011<br />Page 13<br />
  30. 30. Confidential Information<br />Confidential Information may include:<br />any Company proprietary information, technical data, trade secrets or know-how<br />Such as: research, product plans, services, customer lists, markets, software, development, inventions, processes, …marketing, finances, or other business information.<br />4/12/2011<br />Page 14<br />
  31. 31. Sharing of Confidential Information<br />Limit distribution, only share with those who have a “need-to-know” <br />have signed a contract that protects the information (NDA, employment agreement, contractor agreement, development agreement, etc.)<br />Label all confidential information as such<br />Properly dispose of Confidential Information<br />Prior to sharing information with another, determine if you need an NDA to cover your discussions<br />4/12/2011<br />Page 15<br />

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