GROUPON WHY THE BUSINESS MODEL JUST WORKS — FOR SOME    by Gregg Stewart                                               ...
  This article appeared in the September 2010 issue of SES Magazine. Contents are copyrighted by TMP Directional Marketing...
        •      Local: Upon registration, indicate your local market to receive offers. In this way, Groupon can           ...
        •      The aforementioned statistic indicates habitual users of social media. According to Royal               Pin...
 Conclusion If this business model works for you, Groupon can be a profitable lead‐generation tool. But be aware of settli...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Magazine Article: Groupon

970 views

Published on

I wrote this article for SES Magazine under the byline of executive leadership, showing how Groupon and group buying use a business model that works for some, not all.

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
970
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Magazine Article: Groupon

  1. 1.    GROUPON WHY THE BUSINESS MODEL JUST WORKS — FOR SOME    by Gregg Stewart             1  
  2. 2.   This article appeared in the September 2010 issue of SES Magazine. Contents are copyrighted by TMP Directional Marketing, 15miles and SES Magazine. What Is Groupon? The concept of couponing is nothing new. Coca‐Cola created the idea in 1887 as a way to offer soda samples to potential customers. Nearly 123 years later, couponing has become a billion‐dollar industry, thanks, in large part, to e‐coupons that are outpacing print coupons 10:1. In 2009, digital coupons alone saved consumers more than $858 million, a 170‐percent increase over the year prior.1 And from July 2009 to July 2010, more than 46.4 million American consumers used online coupons, resulting in more than $1 billion in savings — year‐over‐year growth of 100 percent.2 Like every industry, couponing has had to adapt to changes in technology and media to reach consumers with relevance. What started as simple promo codes for e‐retailing has morphed into a popular breed of e‐couponing that is changing the sales‐promotion game. That’s because the couponing business model has been refreshed to keep pace with today’s consumers. Chicago‐based Groupon — one of many recent start‐ups to test the new style of couponing — is thriving beyond anyone’s initial predictions (I came across one report that called the service “digital coupons on steroids”3). By now, I’m sure you’ve heard that Groupon was valued at $1 billion earlier this year, making it the frontrunner in the e‐couponing industry and a part of an elite group of Web 2.0 start‐ups that have reached the milestone. As the market leader, Groupon, which could reach 150 markets worldwide by 2011, has quickly gone mainstream to generate hefty consumer savings (more than $336 million since its November 2008 launch) through the sale of approximately 7.7 million units (e.g., Groupons). In short, Groupon borrows its business model from The Point, which is the company behind the e‐couponing service. Through collective action, Groupon “works as an assurance contract: If a certain number of people sign up for the [daily deal in each local market], then the deal becomes available to all; if the predetermined minimum is not met, no one gets the deal that day.”4 For businesses, it’s free to advertise on Groupon; the service simply takes a cut from each sale. Groupon Is Cross Platform Why has Groupon been able to impact sales generation for so many local businesses, while remaining profitable for itself? Unlike print coupons that are one dimensional, digital coupons have the potential to go cross platform, combining different marketing facets:  • Online: Register online.                                                              1  Coupons.com, press release, “Growth of Digital Coupons Outpaces That of Printed Newspaper Coupons 10 to 1: Coupons.com Reports 2009 Growth and Year‐End Milestones,” 10 February 2010. 2  Coupons.com, press release, “Growth of Digital Coupons Outpaces That of Printed Newspaper Coupons by 10 to 1, According to New Data Released by Coupons.com: Savings Printed in Last 12 Months Exceeds $1 Billion; June Sets Monthly Printed Savings Record,” 26 July 2010. 3  Location Awhere, blog, “Would the further localization of Groupon still work?” 21 May 2010. 4  Wikipedia.  2  
  3. 3.   • Local: Upon registration, indicate your local market to receive offers. In this way, Groupon can  geographically segment and target subscribers, based on radius.  • E‐mail: Receive a daily Groupon e‐mail.  • Online (again): After clicking the e‐mail’s call to action, redirect to a promotional landing page  to purchase. Rather than receive daily e‐mails, visit a custom URL (e.g.,  Groupon.com/Milwaukee) for your market.  • Mobile: In lieu of e‐mails, download the GPS‐enabled app to browse and redeem local deals (no  printer required).  • Social: The landing page showcases user reviews about the featured business, facilitating online  conversations among shoppers.  • Offline: Groupon, like many social‐commerce services, drives offline response, as customers  must visit the businesses to redeem the deals. Groupon Is Lead Generation  $11 MILLION What makes Groupon so appealing is its lead‐generation  Marking Groupon’s largest national effort potential. Not only does your business gain local brand  to date, Gap offered $50 worth of clothing exposure among thousands, you’re also advertising to an  for $25 on August 19 in 85 markets. audience that may not know of you or may not shop with  >>Learn more at ClickZ Stats by visiting you under normal circumstances. With a discount, they are  ClickZ.com more apt to try something “new,” which equates to new foot traffic. Remember, to get the daily deal, a minimum number must take action, guaranteeing you paying customers, who, according to Groupon, spend 60 percent above the value of the digital coupons. Groupon Is Audience Savvy Audience awareness is critical to Groupon’s success:  • Fifty percent of Groupon users go out at least two times per week (an established base of offline  activities). In fact, Groupon claims that 92 percent of business owners believe the service brings  in eager, “quality” customers, who are committed to spending because they already purchased  the deal.5  • ExactTarget states that 58 percent of consumers start the day by checking e‐mail, making  Groupon a viable platform.6  • Sixty‐eight percent of Groupon users are 18 to 34. This is significant, considering more than 90  percent of online consumers, aged 18 and up, subscribe to permission‐based e‐mails.7 Securing  permission first increases your chances of eliciting positive response (e.g., higher open rate),  versus traditional, “invasive” marketing.  • Groupon’s key age demographic consists of cross‐platform adopters; 95 percent who follow  brands on Facebook or Twitter also subscribe to commercial e‐mail, and 70 percent follow  brands on both Facebook and Twitter.8                                                              5  http://www.grouponworks.com 6  Exact Target, Subscribers, Fans and Followers. 7  CrossView, press release, “Shoppers Prefer Email Promotions Over Social Media, Survey Shows,” 14 July 2010. 8  Ibid.  3  
  4. 4.   • The aforementioned statistic indicates habitual users of social media. According to Royal  Pingdom, 18‐to‐34‐year‐olds comprise the largest segment of users across the 19 social‐ networking sites studied.9 Factor that into Groupon’s concept of relying on users to share offers  via Facebook, Twitter, etc., either by clicking the social‐share icons embedded in the daily  landing pages or by engaging in independent word‐of‐mouth advertising. The importance  behind this is twofold: 1.) No one gets the daily deal if enough customers don’t register (it  benefits users to spread the word), and 2.) users are rewarded with Groupon credits for  recommending others (the viral buzz attracts new customers). Groupon Is Risky? While Groupon seems like a sure‐fire bet for local businesses, one common question I get asked is, “Does it generate brand loyalty, or are users likely to shop around to secure deep discounts?” Groupon is a discount service, so companies have a legitimate concern about its ability to cheapen brands. But bear in mind that Groupon, at its core, is meant for local businesses with limited exposure; it’s not really meant for luxury brands. That’s because an underlying motivation behind Groupon’s deep discounts is the facilitation of less risk for the customer who is unfamiliar with your business. As more sites appear, discounts will become easier to obtain, which could teach consumers to seek discounts first, then quality. But, in the end, your product must drive revenue. It’s Groupon’s function to get customers to your doorstep; after that, it’s up to you. Have you taken an introspective look at your own brand? If your product (and the experience to secure the product) is quality, then most advertising platforms will work. Consider that Groupon works best when your gross profit margin is greater than 50 percent of your retail price. That’s why Groupon caters to and is alluring for businesses that boost profit through add‐on sales (e.g., restaurants and spas). For example, let’s pretend you own a spa that offers $200 massages.  $200 x 50% (discount) = $100  $100 x 50% (Groupon fee) = $50  Your revenue = $50 My recommendation is to closely analyze your business’ goals and objectives, and factor in whether Groupon will work for you. As you strategize, ask yourself if you have slim profit margins. Can you justify cutting your price in half? Can you make a profit through volume? What discount percentage will generate sales volume? Will price reduction create enough repeat business and/or above‐Groupon spending to be profitable? These questions may help you determine alternate avenues.                                                                9  Royal Pingdom AB, “Study: Ages of Social‐Network Users,” 16 February 2010.  4  
  5. 5.  Conclusion If this business model works for you, Groupon can be a profitable lead‐generation tool. But be aware of settling in as Groupon does the work. While Groupon can generate new foot traffic, it’s up to you to create repeat business. Plan now for how you will keep customers coming back. You could develop a loyalty program with incentives to entice repeat sales. Or, through e‐mail or social media, follow up with first‐time customers with an exclusive offer. Whatever you do, strategize about bringing customers incentives in ways that don’t deplete your margins. About the Author  A 20‐year veteran of local‐search marketing for Fortune 500 companies, Gregg Stewart  is vice president of interactive at TMP Directional Marketing and is president of its  interactive‐services division 15miles. As the world’s largest local‐search agency,  TMPDM called upon Stewart to lead the charge of transitioning from a traditional  agency to a comprehensive media firm. He was responsible for assembling high‐ performance teams that developed digital solutions to yield sales‐generating results at  the local level.   @greggstewart                  5  

×