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  • 2 min
  • 3 min: goal of the presentation: teach your peers
  • 3: algorithms, mechanisms, sensors, signal processing, focus on multi-robot systems
  • 2 min: Intelligence is a function of ALL things coming together: sensors, algorithms, mechanisms and communication
  • 2 min – The Athlete robot is no doubt a robot. Focus, however, is on the mechanical design. The robot has 6 legs that can have the robot move, act as pinchers and pick up stuff, or manipulate the environments with add-on tools. There is little sensing, little computation, and little autonomy on this robot. In fact, nobody even bothered thinking about how to coordinate all the different joints (6 x6 ) to actually perform all the actions that the robot theoretically could do.
  • 4 min. Explain Sensing actuation computation and communication. Again: focus is on a revolutionary mechanical design. My labmate at MIT MarsetteVona – a computer scientist like you – built the interface for controlling the robot. He also developed computational tools that allow to calculate all the joint positions of a robot as a function of a virtual articulation. For pinching, e.g., you can think about calculating all your joint positions as a function of contact points with a virtual object. Show video.
  • 6 min – Big Dog, what it can do, why it was build. Interesting mechanical design (four legs with 4 DOF each). Focus here is on control: how to create a gait to move the robot forwards, and – more difficult – how to react so that the robot remains stable
  • 2 min : explain where the meat is in the big dog
  • 5 min : justin is putting it all together, massive sensing, state-of-the art control, mechanism, computation and communication
  • 2 min
  • 4 min

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Robotics
    CSCI 4830/7000-006
    August 23, 2010
    NikolausCorrell
  • 2. Syllabus
    Theory
    Locomotion
    Kinematics
    Perception
    Localization
    Planning and Navigation
    Practice
    Simulation exercises
    Debates
    Participation in online competition
    Youtube
  • 3. Links and Places
    Class wiki
    http://correll.cs.colorado.edu/pmwiki
    Code
    How-Tos and exercises
    CU Learn
    http://culearn.colorado.edu
    Submission of assignments
    Exercises
    CSEL 128
    http://sac.colorado.edu
    Contact
    ECOT 733 (my office)
    Phone: (303) 492-2233
    nikolaus.correll@colorado.edu
    Try this out asap!
    Try this out asap!
  • 4. Textbook
    Introduction to Autonomous Mobile Robots, Roland Siegwart and Illah R. Nourbakhsh, MIT Press
    Available from CU Bookstore next week
    Weekly reading assignments
    Lecture is complementing the book
  • 5. Activities and Grading
    Final examen
    Deliverables
    Weekly reading assignments
    Midterm
    Debate
    Class participation
    Must attend to lectures and seminars
    40%
    20%
    20%
    10%
    10%
  • 6. What will you learn?
    What are robots, what is the science and technology behind building robots and programming them?
    Why is robotics hard?
    Hands-on experience programming of driving, walking and crawling robots
  • 7. What will not be covered?
    Because we will be working in simulation, we will not cover
    Components you build are less likely to work than those that you buy
    Components you bought are much harder to debug than those you built
    Software-engineering
    Take: Advanced robotics
  • 8. Not be covered
    C / C++ / Java
    Computer Vision -> CSCI 5722
  • 9. Why robots?
    Robots will work more efficient and safer than humans
    From repetitive tasks to true autonomy
    Improve lifestyle and education
    Potentially as disruptive as the wheel, printing press, steam engine, internet
  • 10. “Small-scale”
    http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
  • 11. http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
  • 12. http://correll.cs.colorado.edu
  • 13.
  • 14.
  • 15.
  • 16. Early robots
    George Devol, *1912
    ~1940
    ~1950
    Are these robots or automatons?
    Which are more robots than others and why?
    “Unimate”, shipped to GM in 1961
  • 17. What is a robot?
    Sensing
    perception
    Computation
    making sense of your senses
    Actuation and Mechanism
    moving and manipulation
    Communication
    communicating with people, objects and other robots
  • 18. Who is doing robotics?
    Social
    Sciences
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Aerospace
    Engineering
    Physics
  • 19. Athlete Robot, NASA/JPL. Videos © California Institute of Technology, Simulation MarsetteVona
  • 20. Athlete
    Sensing
    Joint positions
    Computation
    Off-line
    Actuation/Mechanism
    6x6 DOF legs, wheels
    Communication
    Remote control
    http://www.mit.edu/~vona
  • 21. “Big Dog”, Boston Dynamics, AP Photo/ApichartWeerawong
    Youtube 4min
  • 22. Big Dog
    Sensing
    Legs: Joint positions and force, ground contact
    Body: Gyroscope, Stereovision
    Computation/Control
    High-frequency closed-loop control
    Actuation/Mechanism
    4 x 4 DOF hydraulic legs
    Communication
    Remote Control
  • 23. Rollin’ Justin, 2009, DeutschesLuft und Raumfahrtzentrum
    Ronny Hartmann/AFP/Getty Images Youtube 3min
  • 24. Justin
    Sensing
    Arms/torso/fingers: position, force/torque
    Head: vision, hearing
    Computation
    Compliant control of fingers and arm
    Object recognition and language processing
    Motion planning for collision-free paths
    Actuation
    2 x 6 DOF Kuka arm, torso, legs, 2 x 4 x 3 DOF hand
    Communication
    Aural and speech
  • 25. Kiva Systems, Picture: Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe Youtube (4min)
  • 26. Kiva
    Sensing
    Bar codes on the floor (localization), odometry
    Computation
    Centralized, grid-based algorithm
    Actuation
    Moving on the grid, lift cupboards
    Communication
    Many-to-one (centralized), user to server
  • 27. This course
    Theory
    How do sensors and actuators work
    How can we describe and control a robot’s motion
    Algorithms for localization and navigation
    Practice
    Programming Robots in Webots
    Designing a robot soccer player
    Debating about robot technology in class
  • 28. Webots
    Realistic, physics-based simulation
    Simulates robot dynamics, sensor noise
    Write controllers in Java or C
    Goal: write a competitive robot for ratslife
  • 29. RatsLife Competition
    Upload your controller to www.ratslife.org
    Controller is evaluated nightly against other players worldwide
    Download a video of the competition the next day
    Upload your controller into a real robot setup
  • 30. Ratslife
    You will design a controller in teams of 2
    Skills
    Perception
    Navigation
    Planning
    You will implement this controller and evaluate it against your peers
  • 31. Summary
    A robot becomes autonomous due to a combination of
    Actuation
    Sensing
    Computation
    Communication
    Robotics is an interdisciplinary effort
    Computer science research makes robots intelligent
  • 32. Next Meetings / Assignments
    Wednesday, 4.45pm, ECCS 128
    First steps in Webots
    Reading
    Webots User Manual (wiki)
    Questions on Chapter 2, pages 13 – 32 (culearn), due Monday, September 13, 5pm.
  • 33. Acknowledgments
    The acquisition of Webots was sponsored by