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Building Collaborative Muscle
 

Building Collaborative Muscle

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We are The Corporate Learning Institute. CLI has been providing clients with custom-designed services since 1986. ...

We are The Corporate Learning Institute. CLI has been providing clients with custom-designed services since 1986.
We work with organizations with the belief that personal, customized services build confident and motivated individual contributors and teams are the backbone for any organization.
For more information about our services, we invite visit our website, at http://www.corplearning.com
Feel free to contact partner Susan Cain at (630)-347-6333
Feel free to contact partner Tim Buividas at (312)-615-2211

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    Building Collaborative Muscle Building Collaborative Muscle Document Transcript

    • Building Collaborative Muscle in Your Organization: Borrowing Best Practices from Matrix Organizations CLI Quick Read CorpLearning.com | CorpLearning@CorpLearning.com | 800.203.6734
    • Building Collaborative Muscle in Your Organization: Borrowing Best Practices from Matrix Organizations SUSAN CAIN, Ed. D. Do the people in your organization operate collaboratively across your company? Many organizations have moved away from a top-down business model (within a department only) toward a more “matrix” operating approach. Many combine both business approaches successfully. Matrix management is essentially a process for pooling people to operate more efficiently across the functional areas of your organization. Skills and information flow horizontally across to better manage large projects, develop products or deliver services. In a way, it creates large multi-disciplinary teams capable of forming powerful interdependent networks. Think “grid” instead of “vertical.” Most employees in matrix companies report to the head of their department and across to project managers or to a self-managed team. When you think about it, this necessitates the need for a multiple command and control structure. A matrix organization necessitates new infrastructures including behaviors, skills and cultural norms around networking and sharing information. The Business Case for Matrix Organizations According to Paul Rogers and Jenny Davis-Peccoud of Bain &Company (http://www.bain.com/Images/DECISIONS_INSIGHTS_12_Networked%20 organizations.pdf), matrix organizations are also known as the networked or “boundaryless” company: It’s a world of multiple bosses, endless solid-line and dotted-line. Decisions, after all, determine performance. Better, faster decisions and better, faster execution naturally produce better results than do poor, slow or badly executed decisions. This connection between decisions and results is intuitive; it’s also supported by data that we gathered from more than 760 companies around the world. Decision effectiveness and financial results correlate at a 95 percent confidence level or higher for every country, industry and company size we studied.1 Companies that rate best on decision effectiveness take two steps that other companies often ignore. First, they identify and concentrate on their most important decisions. This category includes not only the obvious candidates—big decisions involving a lot of resources—but also the routine everyday decisions that deliver (or fail to deliver) a great deal of value over time. Second, these companies work hard to optimize not just the quality of their key decisions but also decision speed, execution and the degree of effort involved. High performance organizations excel on all four dimensions. CorpLearning.com | CorpLearning@CorpLearning.com | 800.203.6734
    • CLI coaches many organizations moving toward increasing their matrix potential. Many experience an increase in speed for delivering outputs enterprise-wide. Borrowing Best Practices from Matrix Organizations Many CLI clients have changed their fundamental approach from vertical management to a matrix-based or modified-matrix approach. “Most corporate employees already need to work across their organization to deliver their outcomes. This creates urgency to build collaboration skills that can help individuals work up, down and across an organization’s functional areas,” CLI’s Dr. Susan Cain noted. How can organizations build collaboration skills quickly and embed them in their culture? CLI has developed a training approach that helps employees transition faster. “We know how adults learn best-with hands-on training; how they make decisions to adopt new skills, and how to embed changes in the organization’s culture,” stated Dr. Cain. There are four essential best practices needed for improving the matrix potential of your organization: 1. A clearly articulated business model explaining the value of matrix operations. 2. A clear map that allows people to understand the expectations, behaviors and action steps they must take to operate in a matrix environment. 3. Informal opportunities for people to network. 4. Formal skill training to help people adapt and articulate the functional skills needed in a matrix organization. These include adapting to change, asking and giving information and support, and solving problems as a multi-functional team. CLI recommends four steps to improving the collaborative potential of employees. 1. Take the pulse of your organization by launching The Denison Organizational Culture Survey-an assessment that measures the perception of your organization’s current capabilities. Analyzing the performance gaps in your organization increases the urgency to change, and sets the needed direction for change to occur. 2. Collaborate with CLI to custom-design a training and development solution to close performance gaps. Focus on the outcomes you need in the performance areas that need it the most. 3. Accelerate results by mixing approaches-use informal and formal meetings and gatherings to introduce the need for change, and formal training for skills and capabilities needed to close them. Then mix skill training in the classroom and with informal CorpLearning.com | CorpLearning@CorpLearning.com | 800.203.6734
    • networking with hands-on activities in the outdoors-on CLI’s low ropes course or portable team challenge activities. 4. Monitor change informally with open discussions or formally with evaluations or, better yet, use The Denison Organizational Culture Monitor, to measure progress toward performance goals. We are The Corporate Learning Institute. CLI has been providing clients with customdesigned services since 1986. We work with organizations with the belief that personal, customized services build confident and motivated individual contributors and teams are the backbone for any organization. For more information about our services, we invite visit our website, at http://www.corplearning.com Feel free to contact partner Susan Cain at (630)-347-6333 Feel free to contact partner Tim Buividas at (312)-615-2211 CorpLearning.com | CorpLearning@CorpLearning.com | 800.203.6734