Summerschool storytelling Roy Grunewald

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Masterclass Storytelling by Roy Grunewald

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Summerschool storytelling Roy Grunewald

  1. 1. THE POWER OF strategic STORYTELLING in experience events
  2. 2. Roy Grünewald CV: •  Studies: Cultural Management, Academy for drama directory •  Drama teacher and director •  Creative producer Arjan van Dijk Events •  General manager municipal theatre Gorinchem / Targett entertainment & events •  Teacher Imagineering & management creative industries NHTV •  Guest teacher concept development and storytelling •  Column writer •  And…
  3. 3. •  www.inextensio.eu commercial and public events •  www.roygrunewald.com concept development & storytelling arts, culture and tourism
  4. 4. I CREATE EXPERIENCES and use STORYTELLING What do you do all day long Mr. Grünewald??? Are you rich????
  5. 5. Commissions: •  Concept development Virtual Museum •  ‘OPEnRAam’ Concerts •  Innovative concept Dutch Fortified Cities Event •  ‘Operalala’ Brabantstad European Cultural Capital •  Touristic experience discoveries •  Concept innovative museum experience ‘Gorcumpascum Magica’ •  Dutch Windmill Experience
  6. 6. PROGRAM •  Why storytelling in events? •  What is strategic storytelling -our brain •  Manipulation of the imagination •  Tools •  Practice
  7. 7. STORYTELLING is the most important instrument to manage and to enrich the experience of the public
  8. 8. Storytelling in events Narratives provide the experience and image and so the VALUE of the event
  9. 9. Storytelling is much more then just telling a story People can imagine, dream, create metamorphoses, they understand (hidden) messages, they feel emotions
  10. 10. Storytelling in events: It’s telling the event story in a way that the number of facts trigger the emotions and is a contribution to the experience A VERY IMPORTANT EVENT EXPERIENCE TOOL
  11. 11. STORYTELLING events have a double aim •  Marketing strategy: the strategic message must be memorable in the consumers brain (content) •  Experience events: to create maximum involvement (design)
  12. 12. But first: WHAT IS STORYTELLING?
  13. 13. STORYTELLING The narrative forces
  14. 14. From Neaderthal…
  15. 15. Till Nokia
  16. 16. Storytelling in daily life •  The first lie… •  Where are you, what are you doing, did something happened? •  Last night I was with that girl… •  Gossips, jokes, bragging, exaggeration, lies, fraud, tricks, love declarations Everything told in another way than announcements or reports
  17. 17. Basicly there are 3 forms of communication •  Announcement (demand, order, point of view) > we do, follow or not etc. •  Report (number of facts, journals, processes) > we accept or not •  Story (imagination, emotion) > let us believe, experience, let us think, learn)
  18. 18. Why we all love stories more than announcements and reports? Why we all understand stories better than announcements and reports?
  19. 19. Because stories activate our brain by triggering imagination curiosity Our brain will puzzle
  20. 20. •  It’s within our DNA •  The gene FOXP2 •  Fysical and neurological skills
  21. 21. Example •  My uncle died at the age of 49. One year later, his butler died •  Harley Davidson is the best motorbike in the world.
  22. 22. Just add… •  My uncle died at the age of 49. One year later, his butler died of grief. > plot, emotion, we wonder, want to know… •  Harley Davidson brings you forward and behind… > Interpretation of facts, insinuation, promise
  23. 23. Strategic words listen
  24. 24. Brain acitivity •  Keys •  Chair •  Coffee •  Perfume •  Secret •  Running away •  Love •  Neutral •  Neutral •  Taste •  Fragrance •  Curiosity •  Movements •  Emotions
  25. 25. Narratives and metaphores, sensorial words, words with secrets, movements, emotions •  Activate our brain in its search (puzzle) for signification, solution •  Trigger our curiosity
  26. 26. How do we recognise a good story? •  We have to understand the facts •  We are involved by the sequence of events •  We feel emotions (laughter, sadness etc.) •  There is a message or morality (what do we learn?)
  27. 27. A good storyteller is able To manipulate the brain of his audience (customer, consumer, public, visitor) etc.
  28. 28. So to tell a brilliant story, (s)he has to: •  Tease the audience (creating curiosity) •  Play with emotions and feelings •  Involve his audience •  Create suspense •  Trigger the imagination of the audience by manipulating the facts
  29. 29. THE TOWER OF LONDON A BLOODY VISIT
  30. 30. A GOOD STORY: Facts and knowledge trigger the IMAGINATION A good story is NOT an announcement or report
  31. 31. What works? basics •  To trigger curiosity •  Step by step building up the imagination •  Activation of the brain •  Result: memory
  32. 32. Storytelling as tool in experience events basics PLUS •  Insinuations and promises •  Translation of the message in a narrative •  Stimulation of imagination •  Wrap the audience, guests in positive emotions •  And they will neeeeeever forget
  33. 33. Practice of storytelling in events •  Concept development (creative proces > storyboard) •  Selling the event (to convince the client) •  Directory and design of the event (to use experience tools > scenario)
  34. 34. So the storyteller (as a concept developer): •  Has to translate the strategic message into a brilliant story •  Has to wrap the message in a way the audience feel positive emotions in their minds.
  35. 35. So the storyteller (as a salesman): •  Has to trigger the curiosity of the client by pulling him into the story •  Has to take the client step by step into the narrative of the event •  Manipulates the client with emotional promises and insinuations •  Bombard him with experiences (emotions, senses, secrets and movements) Then imagination works!
  36. 36. So the storyteller (as event director): •  Has to trigger the curiosity of the guests by pulling them into the story •  Has to take the guests step by step into the narrative of the event •  Manipulates the public with emotional promises and insinuations •  Bombard them with experiences (emotions, senses, secrets and movements) Then imagination works!
  37. 37. EXPERIENCES! Romance, suspence, adventure, discovery, sensations, thrills
  38. 38. The manipulation of the imagination How to activate the brain? How to trigger curiosity? How to create emotions?
  39. 39. STORYTELLING THE TOOLS
  40. 40. YOU CAN HAVE THE MOST BRILLIANT IDEAS… IF YOU CANNOT TELL THEM WITH IMAGINATION AND POWER THE IDEA SHALL NOT BE ACCEPTED
  41. 41. LOGIC THINKING BRINGS US FROM A TO B BUT IMAGINATION BRINGS US EVERYWHERE (Einstein)
  42. 42. The first theatrelaw: ‘your audience is willing to believe what you are and what you tell, if you as an actor (storyteller) are able to convince what you play’ Aristoteles (350 b.C.)
  43. 43. THE KISS OF DEATH!
  44. 44. To convince: •  I believe in what I play (gestures) •  I believe what I’m telling you (language) •  I refer to common knowledge (facts) •  I change reality (manipulating the facts) •  I tease and trigger (manipulating imagination) •  I’m building up suspense (from horror to terror) •  I create a happy end
  45. 45. 3 powerfull instruments to tell idea and message of an event 1.  Story structure (creates cohesion and suspense) > 6 steps 2.  Stratification (using dimensions make stories fascinating) > 3 dimensions 3.  Story energy (make stories convincing) > 5 elements
  46. 46. The incredible story of Little Red Riding Hood and the big bad wolf
  47. 47. 1. STRUCTURE 6 steps
  48. 48. PROLOGUE •  introduction •  dramatis personae •  environment •  time and place/location
  49. 49. THE TRIGGER •  The mission •  The warnings •  The journey from A to B
  50. 50. TEASERS •  building up suspense •  (sub) climaxes and plateaus •  Following trails and false routings
  51. 51. SUSPENSE: •  the audience have information that the characters don’t have •  dosage •  timing
  52. 52. CATASTROPHE •  ultimate climax •  everything seems lost •  and then?
  53. 53. PURIFICATION •  release •  liberation •  salvation •  deus ex machina •  hope
  54. 54. EPILOGUE •  message •  morality •  warning •  (open) ending
  55. 55. STORYTELLING CURVE (structure) suspense prologue introduction trigger subclimaxes & teasers climax purification time epilogue the end
  56. 56. USING THE NARRATIVE OR DRAMATIC CONCEPT OF LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD ALLWAYS WORK!
  57. 57. Endless combinations and variations are possible! But never start with the ultimate climax
  58. 58. Storytelling structure in events The storyboard: Step by step description of the number of ‘things what happen’
  59. 59. Storyboard imagine the event ‘movie’ •  Pre exposure…(invitation, promises) •  …You enter the scene and then… •  …and then…and next…meanwhile… •  …A path of magical moments •  …up to a peak, a climax… •  …pffff…the end and going home… •  …post experience (what is the memory?)
  60. 60. Magical moments •  ‘this is us’… •  Surprise the visitor/guest •  Sub climaxes •  Peaks and easy moments, action and chill
  61. 61. Peak-end rule •  Make the climax memorable •  Timing of the climax moment •  People need time to understand the climax •  The end is ALLWAYS positive (messsage) •  The last experience must be memorable •  > is of great influence of the total experience
  62. 62. storytelling event curve (structure) suspense Pre exposure trigger Mag. mom & teasers Climax, peak chilling time Memory post experience
  63. 63. Structure STORY 1. Prologue 2. Trigger 3. Teasers, building up sub climaxes and suspense 4. Climax 5. Purification 6. Epilogue STORYBOARD EVENTS 1. Pre exposure 2. Entree, start and then… 3. further…next…then… (magical moments) 4. Peak, finale 5. Landing/chilling 6. Post experience
  64. 64. 2. Dimensions 3 Stratifications Secret codes, symbolism, insinuations and interpretations Activate our mind…we wonder
  65. 65. DIMENSIONS •  For children and adults •  Wrapped metafores •  Hidden messsages and symbols •  Suggestive codes •  Insinuations > •  Triggering the subconscious
  66. 66. 1st dimension: physic observations •  Girl: wearing a red riding hood •  Forest: trees, path, grandmothers house •  Wolf: predator who speak human language
  67. 67. 2nd dimension: symbolism, insinuations, promise •  Girl: Why she wears a red hood? How old is she? Naive, initiation rite from child to adult, simple-minded •  Forest: unknown area full of potential danger, slums, the Bronx etc. •  Wolf: hunting for victims, lover boy, gangster, demon
  68. 68. 3rd dimension: judgement and morality •  Girl: Lost her innocence, was saved (learned for the rest of her life: don’t be naive) •  Forest: Darkness, hell of life (be prepared for mischief and disaster) •  Wolf: Human criminal mind, evil (warning)
  69. 69. Her innocence …..
  70. 70. Brutal reality …..
  71. 71. Dimensions in events The railway museum event
  72. 72. 1st dimension: physic observations •  Trains: transportation machines •  Different worlds: transportation concepts •  Travellers: people, moving from A to B •  Technics: machinery
  73. 73. 2nd dimension: symbolism, insinuations, promise •  Trains: economic progress •  Different worlds: people, discovering the world •  Travellers: connecting people •  Technics: inventions
  74. 74. 3rd dimension: value and morality •  Trains: prosperity •  Different worlds: globalisation •  Travellers: understanding •  Technics: innovations
  75. 75. 3. Story energy 5 elements
  76. 76. FIVE ELEMENTS: •  PASSION •  HERO •  OBSTACLE •  INSIGHT •  TRANSFORMATION
  77. 77. MASTERCLASS pitching Convince your client with your STORY
  78. 78. USE NARRATIVE TOOLS •  Start with a promise (make him curious) •  Use the LRR structure •  Magical moments •  Secret codes and dimensions •  Peak end rule
  79. 79. USE NARRATIVE LANGUAGE •  Use strategic words, but don’t exaggerate! •  Triggering senses •  Emotions •  Atmosphere •  Movements
  80. 80. THE CASE •  A Sylvester party •  100 guests •  Message: it was a bad year because of the crisis, but we believe in a better future •  Special location •  Good catering and entertainment •  From 10 pm till 2 am
  81. 81. PRESENTATION •  Sell your idea of the ‘voyage’ of the guests from A to B in a brilliant story •  Convince in 7 minutes •  Use the ‘experience’ curve •  Use a theme •  Remember: tell a STORY, not serial announcements or a report
  82. 82. 22.00 23.00 00.00 01.00 02.00 hours A B
  83. 83. Blue = pre exposure/prologue and trigger Yellow = step by step program Star = climax/peak Green = peak end rule and post exposure
  84. 84. QUESTIONS?
  85. 85. EVALUATION
  86. 86. TOI TOI TOI ROY
  87. 87. This ppt presentation owns to Roy Grünewald Special Concepts. You may only use this for study purposes. Publication and/or presentation for other purposes is not allowed without written permission of the author: Roy Grünewald, Haarstraat 3, 4201 JA Gorinchem +31183-632742 / +316-53781356 roygrunewald@hotmail.com

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