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    Ed tech 503   instructional design - final project Ed tech 503 instructional design - final project Document Transcript

    • Setting Up a Google+ AccountSarah Miller03/26/2012EdTech 503, Jennifer Freed
    • Page |2Table of ContentsReflective Synthesis Paper ........................................................................................................................ 4Part 1 – Topic .............................................................................................................................................. 6 Part 1a – Stated Learning Goal ............................................................................................................. 6 Part 1b – Description of the Audience ................................................................................................ 6 Part 1c – Rationale .................................................................................................................................. 6Part 2. Analysis Report .............................................................................................................................. 7 Part 2a – Description of the Need ........................................................................................................ 7 Part 2a.1 – Needs Analysis Survey .................................................................................................. 7 Part 2a.2 – Needs Analysis Survey Results Report ....................................................................... 8 Part 2b – Description of the Learning Context................................................................................... 9 Part 2b.1 – Learning Context ............................................................................................................ 9 Part 2b.2 – Transfer Context ........................................................................................................... 11 Part 2c – Description of the Learners ................................................................................................ 12 Part 2d - Learning task analysis ......................................................................................................... 14Part 3 – Planning ...................................................................................................................................... 24 Part 3a – Learning Objectives ............................................................................................................. 24 Part 3b – Matrix of Objectives, Blooms Taxonomy, and Assessments. ....................................... 26 Part 3c – ARCS Table ........................................................................................................................... 29Part 4 – Instructor Guide ......................................................................................................................... 31Part 5 – Learner Content ......................................................................................................................... 35Part 5a. Learning Materials ..................................................................................................................... 35 Part 5b. Formative and/ or Summative Assessment Materials...................................................... 40 Part 5c. Technology Tool Justification ............................................................................................... 41Part 6 – Formative Evaluation Plan ....................................................................................................... 41 Part 6a – Expert Review ...................................................................................................................... 41 Part 6b – One-to-One Evaluation ....................................................................................................... 42 Part 6c – Small Group Evaluation ...................................................................................................... 43 Part 6d – Field Trial.............................................................................................................................. 43
    • Page |3Part 7 – Formative Evaluation Report ................................................................................................... 45 Part 7a – Evaluation Survey or Rubric .............................................................................................. 45 Part 7b – Report the Results of the Expert Review .......................................................................... 47 Part 7c – Comments on Change ......................................................................................................... 49Part 8. AECT Standards Grid ................................................................................................................. 49Works Cited .............................................................................................................................................. 50
    • Page |4Reflective Synthesis PaperI have said before that I think instructional design is like magic: like pulling a rabbit out of a hat.As I have progressed through this class, though, I have come to realize that it is more like magicthan I thought, but it most closely mirrors the behind-the-scenes process; it resembles thescaffolding holding up the crane suspending the floating object on the magician’s stage. I won’tpretend to really be knowledgeable about what goes on behind the scenes, in order for a magictrick to take place or a beautiful circus act to look effortless, but I think that instructional designis similar.Experienced teachers can pull a rabbit out of a hat, without 16 weeks of preparation, like we’vehad. The best can make you believe and love that what they are teaching you is one of the mostuseful pieces of information you will ever learn, seemingly without any effort. At one point inthe past, however, they put a lot of work into the framework for that lesson. They considered iftheir students needed to learn the material, whether they had the equipment needed to teachthe lesson, and what strategy or strategies they would employ.In order to perform a convincing magic trick, one needs to be familiar with the design processnecessary to achieve the desired outcome. That’s what we’ve accomplished, this term – welearned how to get from Point A (we want our students to learn X) to just before Point B (today,I’m going to teach a lesson on X). Personally, it has been eye-opening. I thought I had a goodidea of what instructional design was and I thought I had worked as an instructional designerat one point. While both of those things still seem true – at least partially - it is also true that Ihave never received any formal training in instructional design. Right now, even though I’mexhausted and as long as I had access to an appropriate SME, I could design you a lesson onmaking a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.In the course of this project, there were a couple of things that I found particularly challenging(and continue to find challenging). The first occurred in the first part of the project: I was notsure exactly how much detail to go into, in developing objectives and creating my flowcharts.For instance, my Goal Statement was comprised of five objectives and at least ten sub-objectives. At the time I thought is that enough? Do I need to break down the sub-objectivesinto sub-sub-objectives? Later on, I saw how iterative the process of instructional design is.After each phase of the formative evaluation, in an ideal world, I would not only make changesthat came out of each stage, but also revise my objectives – change, create or eliminate objectivesbased on the experiences of my learners, feedback from peers, and my own thought process.The second part of this process that I found (and continue to find) challenging came during thesecond part of the project, when we created our instructor guides. My SME Katie said that Ihad not quite gone into enough detail for an instructor to have to use the guide – that it should
    • Page |5have include more timeframes and tips for delivery, for example. She said that if I had writtenthe guide for myself, that it would have been enough detail. Having her read through myproject actually provided me with a little much-needed clarity on the process. I could return tothat part of my project, right now, and flesh out some of the details that she mentioned.Without more specifics, experience or research, however, a lot of that new information wouldbe the product of educated guesswork.This process has been at times strenuous. However, I’ve been looking forward to this class formonths and it is a huge relief to come to the end of it and feel as though I could go out into theworld and design instruction. Specifically, the class will provide a good knowledge base as Imove into my second instructional design class – Instructional Design for Online Learning. Idon’t know exactly how one flows into the other or specifically how either class will influencemy chosen career. What I do know is that I need this experience and education in order to dowhat I feel like I am meant to do in the world.Once I have completed the MET program, I hope to do a combination of things, includingdesigning online training (obvious use of this new knowledge), teaching online classes, andworking as a distance learning administrator of some kind. Ideally, I would like to do this fromhome, but I would also be content to continue working in the nation’s community or juniorcolleges.I am relieved that this class was taught the way that it was. The instructor demonstrated what Ithought was really good instructional design by involving us in our learning. Each week wehave built part of a lesson plan and many of us will leave with a quality, finished usableproduct. I was reading through the 1997 article by Constance Mellon, “Goal Analysis: Back tothe Basics,” where she describes an experience she had in an early software development class.She spent the first 10 weeks of a 14 week term demonstrating what could be done withmultimedia and at the end of the 10th week, she told her students to build a multimedia website.Apparently Constance thought this was a bit daunting of a task to undertake that late in theterm. I am glad that this class was not like that.
    • Page |6Part 1 – TopicPart 1a – Stated Learning GoalGiven prior instruction in ratios and percent and 2 hours of instruction in 4 30-minutesessions, basic math students at a community college will be able to set up a Google+profile, move people and pages they are interested in "following" into pre-determinedcircles, and then complete a worksheet based on information from their circles.Part 1b – Description of the AudienceThe audience for this lesson will be high school students that have received priorinstruction in ratios or percent. This lesson would also be appropriate for first yearcollege students that received prior instruction in ratios and percent, or have recentlygraduated from high school, where they received instruction in ratios and percent.Part 1c – Rationale 1. I chose this topic because if they are not, already, students should be familiar with some form of social networking site. Google is a widely used toolbox of applications in education, and if there were a social networking platform that has “buy-in” this seems like a natural choice. It is easy to collaborate with classmates and co-workers using Google Chat or Hangouts, although this lesson will not cover those features. 2. The instruction would be a healthy mix of supplantive and generative instructional approaches (50% Supplantive and 50% Generative, or 60% Supplantive and 40% Generative). 3. The major instructional strategy for this project will be Declarative. 4. The majority of the learning goals for this lesson were declarative. Words like “define, give, describe, will be able to, and know” were used when the learning goals were written, and those words describe declarative knowledge. Learners will be given some background information on social networking. They will also be provided with some procedural knowledge before being let loose to create a new Google account and sign into Google+.
    • Page |7Part 2. Analysis ReportPart 2a – Description of the NeedPart 2a.1 – Needs Analysis SurveyI developed a needs analysis survey of 18 questions and distributed it to a group ofpeople that I thought would have similar characteristics to the group of learners that Iwanted to focus on. The survey focused on their comfort level with technology, howmuch they use several pieces of technology, and their willingness/ desire to learn more.The survey was created as a form in Google docs and distributed to 50 people viaFacebook and my mobile phone. Here is the link to the survey that people received:http://bit.ly/50312sbm. I used the first 25 responses that I received in my NeedsAnalysis.Here are the questions I included:Needs Assessment Survey Questions1 How comfortable are you with using a personal computer?2 Do you have regular access to a computer?3 How comfortable are you with the concept of social networking?4 Which of the following social networks do you use on a regular basis?5 Approximately how many hours per day do you spend using a social network?6 Do you regularly use email?7 Which of the following email services do you use on a regular basis?8 Approximately how many emails do you send per day?9 Do you have a Google account?10 Have you heard of Googles social network, Google+?11 If you answered no to the previous question, how comfortable would you be with incorporating Google+ (or another social network) into your business or school work?12 Do you want to learn how to set up a Google+ profile?13 Is a social network (such as facebook or twitter) regularly used in your school or place of business for either collaboration on work or distributing information?14 If you were going to be taught how to set up a Google+ profile, how would you like to see the information presented (check all that apply)?15 Do you want to use Google+ to reinforce knowledge of other subjects?16 How introverted or extroverted do you consider yourself to be?17 How do you prefer to spend your time?18 What is your preferred method of communicating with others (check all that
    • Page |8 apply)?Part 2a.2 – Needs Analysis Survey Results ReportOverall, my respondents were pretty comfortable with technology. Nearly all of themhave regular access to computers and use email. Virtually all of the respondents arecomfortable using facebook and most of them have at least heard of Google’s socialnetwork, Google+.The respondents seemed split on their interest in using a social network at work orschool, and they did not appear to want learn more about Google+ overall. My surveydid not allow for “Additional Comments,” though I do wish I had included them. Itcould have provided a bit more insight into what respondents were thinking about,when they filled out the survey.In order to simplify my results, I averaged the numeric level of comfort with personalcomputers for my respondents with the numeric level of comfort of respondents withsocial networks. 76% of respondents are “very comfortable” with computers and socialnetworks, while several others are still a bit wary. Answers I received were on a scaleof 1 (not comfortable) to 5 (very comfortable). Level of Comfort w/ Computers and Social Networking: Average 3 4 5 4% 20% 76%
    • Page |9Part 2b – Description of the Learning ContextThe learning environment for this project will be a high school or college level computerlab, equipped with enough computers for the size of the class. If the class is too largefor the computer lab available, learners will be taught in multiple sections. Learners willhave already received instruction on ratios and percent. Part of their work will be doneonline and part of it will be done with pencil and paper. The instruction will bedelivered in person, but could also be delivered online or with the aid of a flash-basedtutorial.What Learner Characteristics are important to assess in the context of my Project.Learners need to be computer literate; they need to have the oft-mentioned priorinstruction in ratios and percent. I hope that they will have an interest in social media,or at least an awareness of it.Some of the questions I will need to ask, in order to determine my learnercharacteristics: o Do you have regular access to a computer? o Do you use a computer regularly? o Are you a member of a social network, such as facebook or twitter? o Do you regularly keep in touch with friends, family, and/ or classmates on said social network? o Do you have an account with Google, already? o Are you interested in using social media to help you reinforce some of the things you are learning in your math class?Part 2b.1 – Learning ContextWe have a computer lab at Tillamook Bay Community College that is probablyrepresentative of where this lesson would take place. It has about 15 standarddesktop computers with internet access available, and a whiteboard at the front ofthe room. The school also has a laptop cart with around 8 computers on it, soalthough space would be at a premium, the computer lab could accommodate up to23 learners. The room is also equipped with a projector.The instructors I have thought about for teaching this lesson are under the age of50. They come from diverse backgrounds and they teach a variety of subjects –computer application systems, business and writing. We also have one instructorunder the age of 30 that is teaching a noncredit class in Facebook marketing. As anexample, here is the description of that class:
    • P a g e | 10 Facebook Marketing for Small Business, Introduction C (Insert Citation) Introductory course for Small Business Owners who do not currently have a Facebook account or limited usage of the site. Topics are hands-on and include navigating Facebook, creating a personal and business account, basic site management, and evaluating effectiveness. This course is offered through OSU Open Campus. The cost is $49. Register at: https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/334I also looked at the previous college I worked with and found something similar: Series III: Summer term “Marketing for Today” (Insert Citation) The focus of this 6-session program includes all areas of marketing for the business professional. Topics discussed include: using traditional marketing methods; newspaper, radio, TV, and writing press releases; customer service, knowing what a customer wants, treating the customer right, solving customer service issues; improving sales skills, prospecting for customers, making the pitch, closing the sale; social networking and blogging, Facebook, Twitter, cautions; going to The Cloud; effective use of your website, search engines and marketing your websiteNeither class description mentions Google+ specifically, but a lesson on how tocreate and use a Google+ profile could be a valuable central point to a similar class.Both of these schools are vastly different. Tillamook Bay Community College issmall, contained in single building and serves fewer than 2000 students peracademic year. The other school is a multi-building campus with a couple ofsatellite campuses, and it serves about 10000 students per year.Given their disparate sizes and the fact that both schools have a similar classoffering, I think a lesson in how to set up a Google+ profile is timely and given theright time and place, it could be useful.
    • P a g e | 11Part 2b.2 – Transfer ContextMany of the skills learned or used in this lesson will be transferable, even thoughcollectively it is difficult to ascertain when one would put together a Google+profile for the sole purpose of completing a math worksheet.First of all, the obvious computer skills that students must have prior to completingthis lesson. For the sake of simplicity, I have assumed that all of my learners knowhow to use a personal computer and a computer mouse. Using a computer isalmost as necessary as breathing, at this point. Students should be able to use acomputer and recognize it as something that could enhance both their professionaland personal lives.Google+ itself is as good a tool for social networking as any of them and shouldstudents choose too, they will be able to continue to use their Google Accounts andGoogle+ profiles for any purpose they choose, once the lesson has ended. Forinstance, if I had a pet-sitting business, I could post specials (“2 Nights for the Priceof 1!”) or announce prize-winners (“Congrats to Suzy Q – she won a free massage!).Finally, learners will be completing a worksheet on ratios and percent, once theyhave completed setting up a Google+ profile. This activity will help them reinforceknowledge that they have been exposed to, already. Ratios and percent are usefulin a variety of settings: determining how many gallons of gas it would take for yourcar to travel 321 miles, for example.
    • P a g e | 12Part 2c – Description of the LearnersIn general, learners will be first or second-year college students that havecompleted beginning algebra. They need to know how to operate a personalcomputer and mouse, and be able to comfortably navigate the internet. Ideally,they will be open-minded about technology and the advent of social networking inschools and businesses.When I distributed my Need Assessment Survey, I asked respondents if they wereintroverted or extroverted, and how they would want to have information aboutGoogle+ delivered to them. The responses I received were across the entirespectrum of Introversion vs. Extroversion with 1 being “Very Introverted” and 7being “Very Extroverted.” Here is what my results looked like: How Introverted or Extraverted are You? 1(Very Introverted) 2 3 4 5 6 7 (Very Extroverted) 0% 12% 16% 8% 20% 20% 24% Figure 1 How Introverted or Extraverted Are You?For this subject matter, I thought it would be interesting to see how respondentswould like to see have information delivered to them. I did not know what theirresponses would be and with such a homogeneous mix of Introversion andExtraversion, I do not know if I could have correctly predicted their responses,either. It turns out that nearly 50% of my respondents would like have informationdelivered to them via a computerized tutorial, with help available to them, if theyneed it.
    • P a g e | 13How Would You Like to Have Information Presented? Alone Lab Tutorial Lecture 7% 25% 47% 21% Figure 2 How Would You Like to Have Information Presented?
    • P a g e | 14Part 2d - Learning task analysisFigure 3 Learning Objective - Given prior instruction in ratios and percent and 2 hours of instruction in 4 30-minute sessions, basic math students at a community college will be able to set up a Google+ profile, move peopleand pages they are interested in " following" into pre-determined circles, and then complete a worksheet based oninformation from their circles.
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    • P a g e | 24Part 3 – PlanningPart 3a – Learning ObjectivesMajor ObjectiveGiven prior instruction in ratios and percent and 2 hours of instruction in 4 30-minutesessions, basic math students at a community college will be able to set up a Google+profile, move people and pages they are interested in "following" into pre-determinedcircles, and then complete a worksheet based on information from their circles.Detailed Objectives1. After engaging in 1 30-minute instruction session, learners will be able to define and give examples of social networking.1.a. After engaging in the first 10 minutes of the first 30-minute instruction session… learners will know what the definitions of social media and social networking are, and be able to explain the difference between them.1.b. After engaging in the 2nd and 3rd 10 minutes of the first 30-minute instruction session… learners will have formed into small groups and discussed several different social networks that are currently in use.2. At the end of the first instruction session, learners will be able to describe Google+ to someone who has a rudimentary knowledge of social media.2.a. After engaging in the first 15 minutes of the first 30-minute instruction session… learners will be able to define Google+.2.b. During the 2nd 15 minutes of the first 30-minute instruction session… learners will explain Google+ in their small groups or online discussions.3. After engaging in the second (and/or third) 30-minute instruction session, the learners will be able to demonstrate that they know how to set up a new Google account.3.a. After engaging in the first 10 minutes of the second 30-minute instruction session… learners will be able to determine whether or not they already have a Google account.3.b. After engaging in the 2nd 10 minutes of the second 30-minute instruction session… learners that already have a Google account will be asked to navigate to the Google
    • P a g e | 25 website and sign in and be patient, while learners that do not already have a Google account will be asked to navigate to the Google website and demonstrate that they know how to create a new account.3.c. After engaging in the 3rd and final 10 minutes of the second 30 minute instruction session… learners will be asked to sign into their new Google accounts, if they have not already done so, and demonstrate that they can familiarize themselves with the black menu bar at the top of the screen.4. After engaging in the third 30-minute instruction session, the learners will be able to demonstrate that they can set up a Google+ account, describe what circles are, how to create them and how to find and add their classmates to circles that have been pre-determined by their instructor.4.a. After engaging in the first 10 minutes of the third 30-minute instruction session… learners will be able to demonstrate that they can sign into and set up their Google+ accounts, and find the “Circles” button.4.b. After engaging in the 2nd 10 minutes of the third 30-minute instruction session… learners will be able to describe what circles are and how to create them.4.c. After engaging in the 3rd and final 10 minutes of the third 30 minute instruction session… learners will be able to demonstrate that they can find and add their classmates to circles that have been pre-determined by their instructor.5. After engaging in the fourth and final 30-minute instruction session, learners will have reviewed the concept of circles, will know how to determine how many people are in a single circle, know how to determine how many total people they have circled, and determine how many people have circled them. (Procedural knowledge (IS).)5.a. After engaging in the first 10 minutes of the fourth 30-minute instruction session… learners will have reviewed the concept of circles and will know how to determine how many people are in a single circle.5.b. After engaging in the 2nd 10 minutes of the fourth 30-minute instruction session… learners will demonstrate that they know how many people are in a single circle.5.c. After engaging in the 3rd and final 10 minutes of the fourth 30 minute instruction session… learners will know how to demonstrate that they can determine how many total people they have circled and how many people have circled them.
    • P a g e | 26Part 3b – Matrix of Objectives, Blooms Taxonomy, and Assessments.Matrix of Objectives, Blooms Taxonomy, Assessment PlanLearning Bloom’s Format of Description of Sample items (e)Objectives Taxonomy Assessment test form (d)(a) Classification (b) (c)1 Knowledge Post- Paper and Please give me 3 Assessment Pencil examples of social Assessment networks:1.a Comprehend Post- Paper and What is the Assessment Pencil difference between Assessment a social network and social media?1.b Comprehend Post- Observation: On Give Student Y an Assessment the Job example of a Performance currently used Social Network and tell them what it is most commonly used for.2 Comprehend Post- Paper and Give me a simple Assessment Pencil definition of Assessment Google+:2.a Knowledge Post- Paper and What is Google+? Assessment Pencil Assessment2.b Knowledge Post- Observation: On Explain to Student Assessment the Job Y what Google+ is. Performance3 Apply Post- Observation: On Show me how you Assessment the Job navigated to the Performance Google website.3.a Apply Pre- Observation: On Please raise your Assessment the Job hand if you already have a Google
    • P a g e | 27 Performance account.3.b Apply Post- Observation: On Learners Assessment the Job demonstrate ability Performance to find and fill out the form for creating a new Google account.3.c Apply Post- Observation: On Do you use any of Assessment the Job the applications Performance that you see in the black menu bar? What are they?4 Knowledge Post- Observation: On What is a circle? Assessment the Job Performance4.a Apply Post- Observation: On Please sign into Assessment the Job your Google+ Performance account.4.b Knowledge Post- Observation: On Show me how you Assessment the Job would create a new Performance circle named “Gamma”.4.c Apply Post- Observation: On Show me how you Assessment the Job would add Student Performance Y to your circle called “Gamma”5 Comprehend Post- Paper and Write down how Assessment Pencil many total people Assessment have you circled.5.a Apply Post- Paper and How many people Assessment Pencil are in the circle Assessment called “Gamma”?5.b Apply Post- Paper and Find the number Pencil that indicated how
    • P a g e | 28 Assessment Assessment many people you have circled. Write it down.5.c Apply Post- Paper and Find the number Assessment Pencil that indicates how Assessment many people have circled you. Write it down.
    • P a g e | 29Part 3c – ARCS TableCategories & Subcategories Process QuestionsATTENTIONA.1. Perceptual arousal • What can the instructor do to capture their interest? How can students use this information in their livesA.2. Inquiry arousal outside of the lesson?A.3. Variability • How can the instructor stimulate an attitude of inquiry? Ask students if they have any questions. Ask if they know how this can be used in other classes. Put a screenshot up on the projector and see if that arouses any questions from the learners. • How can the instructor maintain their attention? A tutorial built in flash (for example) would provide visual interest. Reminders of how Google+ can be used in the “real world” would also be helpful.RELEVANCER.1. Goal orientation • How can the instructor best meet the learners’ needs (How do the instructor know their needs?)R.2. Motive matching A needs assessment was done to try and determine the needs of my learners. The showed an interest inR.3. Familiarity communicating with friends/ family and providing updates from the companies they work for. The instructor can gear the discussion toward things of this nature, before turning them loose on building a Google+ profile. • How and when can the instructor provide the learners with appropriate choices, responsibilities, and influences? At the end of each segment, the learners have responsibilities to complete, whether it’s presenting a piece of information to the instructor, discussion of something with their classmates, or putting together part of the Google+ profile. • How can the instructor tie the instruction to the learner’s experiences? Most people will have used Facebook or twitter. The instructor can show them how they can perform similar activities to what they’ve encountered in Facebook,
    • P a g e | 30 twitter or Skype in Google+. They can interact with friends, family and colleagues in much the same way.CONFIDENCEC.1. Learning requirements • How can the instructor assist in building a positive expectation for success?C.2. Success opportunities Continual emphasis of the relevance of learning about Google+ and completing the profile. If this is part of anC.3. Personal control unrelated class, extra credit could be provided. Learners may also enjoy the chance to collaborate with their peers. • How will the learning experience support or enhance the students’ beliefs in their competence? The students will have a finished product at the end of the lesson. They will have fully set up a Google+ profile and learned how to connect with people using that profile. • How will the learners clearly know their success is based on their efforts and abilities? The instructor is not handing out Google+ profiles. She/ he is providing guidance on how to set up a profile. If learners are leery of “the web” or they struggle mechanically with operating a computer and mouse setup, they will find it necessary to work a little harder to complete this lesson.SATISFACTIONS.1. Natural consequences • How can the instructor provide meaningful opportunities for learners to use their newly acquired knowledge/skill?S.2. Positive consequences Letting them know they can connect with the instructor on the social network (another benefit to Google+ is that itS.3. Equity seems to have more of a professional “bent” than Facebook) or encouraging them to connect with their classmates in the future will provide this for the learners. • What will provide reinforcement to the learner’s successes? Either a grade or extra credit will provide the positive consequence. There is also no code to mess up, so if a learner successfully sets up a Google+ profile, they will have a clean, professional-looking web space to use, when
    • P a g e | 31 they are done with the class. Additionally affirmations throughout the lesson such as “good job” and “way to go” can provide “positive consequences. • How can the instructor assist the students in anchoring a positive feeling about their accomplishments? Re-iterate that social networking is a major way in which people communicate and in fact many of the learners’ friends and family probably use a similar website to communicate with one another. The learners will be able to communicate with the people they care about with more ease, if they were not previously familiar with social networking.Part 4 – Instructor GuideIntroductionActivate Attention or Gain AttentionAttention may be gained in a couple of different ways, for this particular lesson.First, the instructor can start the lesson off with a couple of well thought-out questions thatlearners will presumably want to participate in answering. For instance, the instructor couldask any of the following: 1. How many of you use Facebook? What do you use it for? 2. Do your places of business use Facebook or another social network? 3. What do you think Google does? Did you know they also have a social network?Second, if the lesson comes in the form of a tutorial or other online module, the learning event isgoing to be in the form of introductory graphics or a snappy user interface.For the purposes of this project, however, gaining the learners’ attention will most likely beaccomplished through probing questions or detectable enthusiasm on the part of the instructor.Establish Purpose or Inform Learners of PurposeIn this lesson, the learners are going to be setting up a Google+ profile. Establishingpurpose can be as simple as stating that. The instructor may want to look over the detailedlist of objectives and point out a few of the major points he/ she will be covering in thelesson: 1. Background and definitions for social networks.
    • P a g e | 32 2. Setting up a Google+ profile. 3. Working with Circles.Arouse Interest and Motivation or Stimulate Learners’ Attention/MotivationThe instructor should explain why learning to use a social network is important. They cantalk about how social networking is a prolific form of communication, not only in thepersonal lives of millions of people, but in their professional lives as well.Businesses regularly post events and updates to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.The instructor should emphasize that social networking is going to continue to be a part ofall our lives.Preview the Learning Activity or Provide OverviewIn this lesson, the instructor will first provide an overview of social media and socialnetworking. Next, he/she will put the students into small groups, in order to discusscurrently used social networks.Later in the lesson, the instructor will guide students through the process of setting up a Googleand/ or a Google+ account. After that, students will be asked to sort their classmates intoCircles/ Groups within Google+.Finally, learners will be asked to perform some simple ratio and percent calculations usinginformation from their circles.BodyRecall relevant prior knowledge or Stimulate recall of prior knowledgeEven in the unlikely event that learners have not heard of Facebook, the concept of socialnetworking will be introduced. By the end of the first 30 minute instruction session, knowledgeof social networking will become prior knowledge and students will be able to recall it for thepurposes of their small group discussions.Additionally, the instructor might make it a point to compare social networks to our in-the-fleshnetworks of friends, family and colleagues. In doing this, learners might be lead to thedefinition of an electronic social network, where people connect, help one another or hang out.This might also be a good time to mention that you can “hang out” with others online, too,either through video chat or Google+’s “hang out” feature.Process information and examples or Present information and examples
    • P a g e | 33Focus Attention or Gain & Direct AttentionWhen learners start working on setting up their profiles, it might be necessary to keep themfocused on the task at hand. The instructor might do this by posing questions to the group,such as: 1. What similarities or differences do you notice between the sign up process for Google+ and Facebook? (Might not be a relevant question for Facebook users that are going on 5 or so years of usage.) 2. Can other social networks be connected to Google+ or vice-verse?The instructor should remind students that they can continue to use this profile for theirpersonal or professional use, once the lesson is completed.Employ Learning Strategies or Guide or Prompt Use of Learning StrategiesPrompts the instructor can use to stimulate learning might include the following: • “In order to remember the address for Google, think of the number. Maybe the visual will help you remember the address.” • “When you create a new password for your Google account, be sure to write it down somewhere. Suggest that learners enter it into a notepad file, for now, and save it to a flash drive. There are also ways to create secure files – it might be helpful to have one of these methods handy, in the event of more paranoid learners.” • “One option is to write the password, username and site where it is used in a word document. You can then “protect” the document in MS Word with a password.”Practice or Provide for and Guide PracticeThe instructor should expect that at the end of each 10 or 15 minute section of the lesson,the learners will be conferring with a small group. During these times, they will bepracticing the information that they have gained during the presentation portion of thelesson.Additionally, there is a practical aspect to this lesson, where the student actually builds andsets up a profile. Presumably, this takes place during and after the demonstration portionof the lesson. Naturally, students will need to practice what has been covered in the lesson,in order to complete the major learning goal for this lesson.
    • P a g e | 34If a beneficial electronic tutorial were made available to guide the students through tisprocess, then the instructor could let the students “practice” and follow the tutorial, and beable to answer questions, rather than being the tutorial.Evaluate Feedback or Provide FeedbackThe instructor will ask the students to answer questions on working with circles, towardthe end of the 3 or 4 instruction sessions. This will be the most complicated aspect of thislesson. Additionally, if students have provided accurate information about their circles, theinstructor should be able to determine if the answers on their ratios/ percent worksheet arecorrect.ConclusionSummarize and review or Provide summary and reviewThe instructor will re-iterate what has been covered during the lesson. The instructor canreview the fractions/ percent worksheet with the class as a whole, if she/ he chooses, andreview any vague or confusing points of the lesson during that conversation with thelearners.Transfer learning or Enhance transferThe instructor will re-emphasize that students can continue to use their Google+ profiles (orother social network profiles) in life outside of this lesson. More than likely, their friends,family and co-workers use them. Down the line, they may be asked to do something likemanage the social media of a business they currently work for, plan to work for or start inthe future.Like the telephone and video and email, social networking websites are a way tocommunicate and therefore, they’re relevant to a life outside of the classroom.Granted, it is unlikely that the learners will need to calculate statistics for their circles,outside of class, unless of course they need to do that in order to project what they want thenumbers to look like for their business, in the future.Remotivate and Close or Provide Remediation and Closure • The instructor will let the learners know that the lesson is over.
    • P a g e | 35 • The instructor will emphasize [again] that the information covered during the lesson can be used at the learners’ will outside of the classroom. Being comfortable with social media might be a deciding factor in a job one day. • The instructor will express appreciation for the learners’ attention and invite them to “circle” him/ her on Google+, and contact him/ her if they have any questions about how to use their profiles.Assess Learning or Conduct Assessment EvaluateAssessment is done throughout the lesson, by listening to feedback from students or byhaving them demonstrate skills necessary to create a Google+ profile.Feedback and Seek Remediation or Provide Feedback and RemediationThere are probably very few lessons out there that are perfect. The instructor will receivefeedback from learners on the pace of the lesson and have the following questions answered: • Does it need to be 1.5 or 2 hours long, or would it be better as a 20 minute lesson, overall? • Does there need to be an instructor, or would the learners prefer to work through a tutorial on their own?Learners contacted during the needs assessment were asked some of these questions, but itwould also be neat to see the instructor administer a post-assessment or follow-up survey, tofind out what the students thought after the fact. Information from the survey will be used toimprove future lessons.Part 5 – Learner ContentPart 5a. Learning MaterialsFlash-Based Tutorial: How to Setup a Google+ AccountAdditionally, I am working on a flash-based tutorial for learners, in the event that theinstructor decides that he or she is interested in going down the tutorial-based route Ihave suggested occasionally.Here is a link to the flash-based tutorial: http://goo.gl/eU6L4. It is currently incomplete,but I hope to complete enough of it to make the point that it would be a useful additionto this lesson in the future.
    • P a g e | 36The group of learners most likely to benefit from this tutorial would be more the more tech-savvy group that is interested in working ahead of the class. There is a lot of room forrefinement and improvement in the tutorial, in order to accommodate a wider spectrum oflearners.The purpose of this material is to reinforce the knowledge that is being delivered by theinstructor by providing a slightly more visual approach to learning the material. It would mostlikely be administered shortly after the first 30 minute instruction session.Screenshots:
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    • P a g e | 38 Worksheet on Ratios and Percent Worksheet: http://goo.gl/cMpZg. This is the worksheet I hope to have learners complete at the end of this lesson in creating a Google+ profile. I really liked the format of the survey I submitted to potential learners, when I did my Needs Analysis, so I have decided to use Google Docs, again, to put this together. I also noticed that when you use Google’s URL Shortener athttp://goo.gl/, a QR code is generated for the URL. If the instructor or learners areinterested in experimenting with mobile technology, it is possible to scan this QR codeand complete the worksheet online.The purpose of this worksheet is to reinforce knowledge of a couple of math concepts –ratios and percent –through the use of the newly created Google+ account. Theworksheet will be used at the end of instruction, or as learners complete the setup oftheir Google+ profiles.Screenshots:Please note: the templates are property of Google. I did not design them – when you create aform in Google Docs, you can select a “theme” as well.
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    • P a g e | 40Part 5b. Formative and/ or Summative Assessment MaterialsI created an assessment using Google Docs that can be administered to the learners atthe end of the lesson. It requests declarative knowledge of the learners. It could beused in conjunction with the Ratios and Percent worksheet, in order to gain a morewell-rounded view of the learners’ abilities, coming out of this lesson.Here is the link to the assessment: http://goo.gl/vPU6c.Screenshots:Please note: the templates are property of Google. I did not design them – when you create aform in Google Docs, you can select a “theme” as well.
    • P a g e | 41Part 5c. Technology Tool JustificationDesktop/ Laptop Computer Lab – each student needs hands-on experience with the setup of the Google+ account. This is only possible if each student is able to work on a computer at the same time as the instructor.Projector – in order for the instructor to demonstrate the creation of a Google+ profile, a projector is a logical tool for delivering information to a group of students.Flash-Based Tutorial – provided as a different format for the delivery of the information, in order to accommodate a wider variety of learners, but also to allow more tech-savvy students to work ahead.Google-Docs-Based Assessments/ Worksheets – Google docs was chosen for convenience. The worksheets and responses are automatically stored online, but in addition, if necessary, the worksheet/ assessment can be printed for learners to fill out.Part 6 – Formative Evaluation PlanPart 6a – Expert Review1. WHO the SME is and WHEN you expect to submit your design document and materials to the SMEand receive feedback.
    • P a g e | 42My SME is Katie Paulson. She’s a PhD candidate in Instructional Design for Online Learning. I’mhoping submit my design to her, early this weekend. She is planning on having it returned to me beforethe end of next week.I worked with Katie for about 2.5 years, and she’s someone whose judgment I trust without hesitation.2. WHAT questions you will ask the expert about your instructional materials (and responses)? • How accurate and up-to-date is the content? • How consistent is the contents perspective? • How consistent is the pedagogical approach with current instructional theory in this content area? • How appropriate is the instruction for the target learners? • How consistent are the instructional strategies with the principles of instructional theory? • Do you see any areas that need to be improved? • Have I overlooked some type of evaluation that is specifically related to the technology being used in the project? • Additional Comments/ Feedback:Part 6b – One-to-One EvaluationIn order to do this evaluation, I would talk to the instructor-to-be about who wouldmake appropriate guinea pigs, or whether we should use staff as guinea pigs. Once wehave secured a couple of “test learners,” I would find out about available facilities andschedule a time where myself, the instructor, and our “test learners” could meet forabout 3 hours. I think this would be more than enough time to run through the lesson,and be able to receive feedback from both the learners and the instructor.At the end of each session, we could have a feedback/ question-and-answer session. Forinstance, at the end of the first session, I would ask the learners what they thought: didthe instructor cover too much information for you to absorb in one sitting; did theinformation seem relevant, meaning do you think you can take anything away from thislesson that you will want to use later on?Surveys are a great tool and we could include one at the end of this trial run, asking foradditional feedback, such as what did they like or dislike about the lesson; what wouldthey change; what learning aides would be useful. This survey could also bedistributed to the instructor, instructional designer and other present parties, for thebroadest feedback.Involved in the process: • Math Instructor • Instructional Designer
    • P a g e | 43 • 1 or 2 Learners representing target audienceKey Questions: • Do you understand the instruction? • What are you thinking as you navigate through the tutorial (if used)? • What could be improved?Part 6c – Small Group EvaluationMy instruction wound up including a lot of group discussion, so it might be beneficialfor the small-group evaluation to be just that. The text mentions that the small groupcould be broken up.In this phase of evaluation, we will be implementing any changes that resulted from theone-to-one evaluation, and asking a lot of the same questions. Additionally, we willdetermine whether the learners have pre-requisite skills. This can be done using pre-and post-testing.In this phase of evaluation, the designer is more of an observer.Involved in process: • Math Instructor • Small group of Learners • Instructional Designer (as an observer)Key Questions: • Do you understand what is being asked of you? • Can you successfully navigate through the tutorial (if used)? • What was the most difficult aspect of this instruction? What was the easiest?Part 6d – Field TrialField TrialIn this phase of the evaluation, we will be implementing any changes that resulted fromthe small-group evaluation. Additionally, we will look at whether there are anyadministrative or equipment issues that crop up during the instruction.During this phase of evaluation, feedback from the learners is once againimportant. Surveys at the beginning of instruction or at the end of the lesson (or both)would be beneficial. In this phase of evaluation, the designer is often not present. His
    • P a g e | 44or her will include managing data: ensuring that pre- and post- tests are distributed,and analyzing data as he or she receives it.Involved parties: • Regular-Sized Group of Target Learners • Math Instructor • Instructional Designer (data analysis)Key questions:On a scale of 1 to 5: • How well did you understand the instruction? • Do you think the tutorial (if used) takes too much time?Additional: • What did you like? • What could be improved?
    • P a g e | 45Part 7 – Formative Evaluation ReportLink to survey: http://goo.gl/OhCisPart 7a – Evaluation Survey or RubricPlease note: the templates are property of Google. I did not design them – when you create aform in Google Docs, you can select a “theme” as well.
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    • P a g e | 47Part 7b – Report the Results of the Expert ReviewOverall, the feedback I received from my SME was good. The average of her numericalresponses to my work was 4 (on a scale of 5). Major suggestions that Katie made forimprovement included the following: • In terms of either teaching the lesson or setting up/ designing the lesson, she suggested a knowledge “scaffolding,” where students that are more proficient with Google+, social media, or technology in general are paired with less knowledgeable students. • Lesson plan needs to be more clearly organized, since the intent of this project is to hand the lesson off to an instructor. This should include “questions, definitions, approximate time on task, dividing into group suggestions, potential feedback or prompts, etc.”Katie also pointed out a few strengths in my project, including the following: • If I can complete my flash tutorial that I want to include with this project, she thinks it is an advantage to this lesson, especially for more tech-savvy students that want to work ahead. • She felt that the lesson was manageable. She also felt that the target audience was clear and that the level of the material was appropriate for that audience.
    • P a g e | 48Table 1 Questions and Responses from Professional Evaluation Numeric/ Mult. Questions Additional Comments Choice Response It appears that the content is up to date and accurate. I am not a current Google+ user but it How accurate and up-to- appears that I could successfully manage this task date is the content? 4 at the end of this mini-course. How consistent is the pedagogical approach with current instructional theory in this content area? 4 This one is very difficult to gauge in social media type learning tutorials. If you have the people who are very computer proficient and tech savvy parts of this may seem to slow. However, if you have less social media and tech savvy learners it may be just right. Consider using some sort of knowledge scaffolding when breaking students into groups so that those who rate themselves as more knowledgeable/proficient in social media for How appropriate is the instance are paired with those less knowledgeable instruction for the target so that the more savvy can help to teach the less learners? 3 savvy and the knowledge will balance out. How consistent are the instructional strategies with the principles of instructional theory? 4 Good alignment in this area I am not sure if this is a lesson that the designer will be teaching or that they will be handing over to an instructor to teach. If it is being handed over to another instructor to teach I think that a clearly organized step-by-step lesson plan would be beneficial. Complete with questions, definitions, approximate time on task, dividing into group suggestions, potential feedback or prompts, etc. However, if the designer is teaching it I assume Do you see any areas that they have all of that knowledge and will have no need to be improved? Yes problem teaching the course as is outlined. Have I overlooked some type of evaluation that is specifically related to the technology being used in the project? No
    • P a g e | 49 Overall, I think this is a very well done project with an appropriate mix of visual aids, activities and tasks chunked into manageable units for both teaching and learning and good rationale for the need. I think having the flash tutorial is an added bonus that can be used as a standalone and/or for Additional Comments/ remediation for those students who may struggle Feedback: with any of the concepts. Great job with emphasizing the benefits of learning a social media tool, the need for the knowledge, and the possible application. The target audience and population is clear and the How consistent is the content is written to meet the needs of that contents perspective? 5 audience.Part 7c – Comments on ChangeI would like to complete more of the tutorial that I promised in the Instructional Materialssection. However, while it is incomplete, it is viewable and the viewer gets a sense of what Iintended.I went through the instructor guide and worked on the tense and tried to make it a little morereadable. I would like to do more work on it, overall, and provide more details to the potentialinstructor.I employed Microsoft Word’s spelling and grammar check, and caught more errors that Ithought were out there.The ratio and percent worksheet is complete and available in the instructional materials sectionof this report.A post-lesson assessment has been created and is available in the assessment materials sectionof this report.Part 8. AECT Standards Grid Assignments meeting standard in whole or part Standard 1: DESIGN 1.1 Instructional Systems Design (ISD) X ID Project 1.1.1 Analyzing X ID Project 1.1.2 Designing X ID Project 1.1.3 Developing X ID Project 1.1.4 Implementing X ID Project 1.1.5 Evaluating X Selected Discussion Forums; ID Project
    • P a g e | 50 1.2 Message Design 1.3 Instructional Strategies X ID Project 1.4 Learner Characteristics X ID Project Standard 2: DEVELOPMENT 2.0 (includes 2.0.1 to 2.0.8) X ID Project 2.1 Print Technologies X Reading Quiz; ID Projects 2.2 Audiovisual Technologies 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies X (all assignments) 2.4 Integrated Technologies Standard 3: UTILIZATION 3.0 (includes 3.0.1 & 3.0.2) 3.1 Media Utilization X (all assignments) 3.2 Diffusion of Innovations 3.3 Implementation and ID Project Institutionalization X 3.4 Policies and Regulations Standard 4: MANAGEMENT 4.0 (includes 4.0.1 & 4.0.3) 4.1 Project Management 4.2 Resource Management 4.3 Delivery System Management 4.4 Information Management Standard 5: EVALUATION 5.1 Problem Analysis X 5.2 Criterion-Referenced Measurement X ID Project 5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation X ID Project 5.4 Long-Range Planning Works Cited1. Mellon, C. (1997). Goal Analysis: Back to the Basics. TechTrends, 42(5), 38–42.2. Smith, P. L., & Ragan, T. J. (2004). Instructional Design (3rd ed.). Wiley.