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Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative
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Literacy National Standards - Getting Creative

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Jill Hammonds from CORE Education shows teachers in New Zealand how to take a creative approach to teaching Literacy under National Standards. The discussion considers what Literacy in the 21st …

Jill Hammonds from CORE Education shows teachers in New Zealand how to take a creative approach to teaching Literacy under National Standards. The discussion considers what Literacy in the 21st century is, and how teachers can utilise information communication technologies (ICTs) to ensure that children develop good literacy, visual, digital, and information skills.

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  • 1. Think back to your own time at school: How did you find reading, writing and maths? What was good, bad or indifferent about it?
  • 2. What were the main stimuli during your preschool development years? How does this affect brain development?
  • 3. And what of today’s kids . . . ?
  • 4. National standards are a reality, and could be great, but as we all know, insanity is about doing more of the same and expecting a different result. Spending more time trying to write better, read better etc is not going to do it. Nor is spending more time measuring where kids are at, unless we then do something creative and interesting that will move our diverse learners forward. We need to get creative and find ways to engage our struggling and achieving students in ways that provide intrinsic incentive, authentic feedback and the opportunity to read and express themselves in ways and on topics that interest them.
  • 5. • Clearly purposeful. • For an audience. • That gets a result. • Where students experience success. • Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better. • Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents.
  • 6. • Response. • Genuine reader reaction. • Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers. • Continued interaction.
  • 7. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction.
  • 8. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. Teachers can use same conferencing by printing out.
  • 9. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos.
  • 10. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer.
  • 11. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer. • Can be emailed to friends and family or put on the web for others to read.
  • 12. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer. • Can be emailed to friends and family or put on the web for others to read. • Built in spelling and grammar checker. The squiggles assist with pen and paper writing also as students become word error aware.
  • 13. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer. • Can be emailed to friends and family or put on the web for others to read. • Built in spelling and grammar checker. • Reviewing toolbar makes editing visible and fun. Final copy is just a highlight and accept away. For Mac Users, in Pages Software, look up “Changes Tracking” in the help menu index for instructions on this function. (Thanks to Carol Kendall for sending me this info so quickly.) You will also find here a wealth of information about the editing and revising functions of the programme.
  • 14. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer. • Can be emailed to friends and family or put on the web for others to read. • Built in spelling and grammar checker. • Reviewing toolbar makes editing visible and fun. • Can be easily stored for later review and for inclusion in an e-Portfolio.
  • 15. • Neat and tidy - no need to rewrite after editing. • Can be illustrated with student pictures or photos. • Can be collaborative - 2 or more at the computer. • Can be emailed to friends and family or put on the web for others to read. • Built in spelling and grammar checker. • Reviewing toolbar makes editing visible and fun. • Can be easily stored for later review and for inclusion in an e-Portfolio. • Can be printed for traditional display and storage - pasted into books if need be.
  • 16. Available online at http://juniorclasses.wikispaces.com/Resources
  • 17. Available online at http://juniorclasses.wikispaces.com/Resources
  • 18. • Not clipart! All students can create better pictures if this is scaffolded for them. • The drawing helps to fuel the writing. • Not the main event so make it speedy. • Using the tools of today - embed photos, videos, sound files etc to bring the writing alive for the reader.
  • 19. • Use a small canvas in the Paint or other programme • Fill with background colour before drawing • Thicken up the lines - use the paintbrush rather than the pencil • Use the dragging tools for speed where appropriate • Don’t allow use of the rubber or bombing. • Cut the time allowed - start with 30 mins, then 15, then 10 or 5. No extensions.
  • 20. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result. • More motivating - students don’t really  Where students experience success. feel as though they are writing.  Where students take responsibility but get the • Can be saved as a movie and embedded support they need to get better. on a webpage, blog or wiki.  Where students can see and measure their own • Creates opportunity for audience - can be progress and take used as e-books for reading in the responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to classroom or beyond. parents. Authentic Feedback • Provides opportunities for pick a path  Response. style writing.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment • Can be an individual story or from a wide variety of storyboarded and worked on by several readers. groups of children working independently  Continued interaction. and then stitched together for completion.
  • 21. Two men began to dig a hole out in our soccer field. They piled the dirt around the sides. The dirt was very, very soft. The pit they dug was made deep enough to put in hot irons and two metal baskets. They were digging a pit for our hangi.
  • 22. A fire was laid beside the pit. When they stacked the wood, they criss-crossed it. The steel hangi irons were on top of the stack of wood. The stack was taller than ME. The day was wet and we saw a wonderful rainbow.
  • 23. (You can use layering of photos one directly over another to get a build up view.) The fire was lit and flames flew up into the air. The fire burned for about two hours. As the flames died down, the men dragged the hot irons out of the glowing embers and heaved them into the pit.
  • 24. Two baskets full of food were carefully put on top of the hot irons. A clean wet sheet was laid over the top, then dripping wet sacks. The men shovelled dirt over the sacks and let the hangi steam away.
  • 25. Two and a half hours later, they shovelled off the dirt and took out the yummy Hangi food. The wet sacks were carefully peeled off. Hot steam poured out of the baskets as they carried them to the long serving tables. Mmmmmmmmmm.
  • 26. The mothers and the teachers served the food to all the hungry children. The Hangi smelt delicious.
  • 27. We ate our plate of yummy Hangi food by the new playground. We had potato, pumpkin, stuffing and chicken. I ate all of my food. I loved my plate of Hangi. It was nutritious and delicious.
  • 28. The cunning fox was out hunting at night in the moonlight. He came to farmer Brown’s home paddock, and snuck down to the henhouse. The chickens were all asleep in the roost. The fox patiently dug his way into the henhouse with thoughts of chicken dinner in mind. BUT . . just as he opened the door to the roost . . .
  • 29. The light went on in the farm kitchen. The back door burst open and Farmer Brown came running down the paddock. He had his shot gun in his hand and he looked like he had roast fox in mind.
  • 30. The chicken on the far roost began clucking and squawking and heaving. All of a sudden out from under her feathers appeared . . .
  • 31. a golden egg. The egg cracked open and a trail of smoke shot out from the shell. Out of the smoke appeared a genie with an angry look on his face. “Oh greedy fox,” he growled. “What are you doing in Farmer Brown’s henhouse? I do believe you have come to steal a chicken. But today is not your lucky day, for instead of stealing a chicken, you are going to become one. And from this day forward, you will live in constant fear of greedy foxes!” There was another great puff of smoke, and where the fox had prepared to pounce, sat a very small and feeble chicken.
  • 32. a golden egg. The egg cracked open and a trail of smoke shot out from the shell. Out of the smoke appeared a genie. “Greetings master fox,” said the genie. “Your wish is my command. What would you have me do for you tonight? “Aha genie” grinned the fox. “I would like you to carry me back to my den and lay out a feast for Mrs Fox and all our little children.” “Your wish is my command,” bowed the genie, and before you could count to ten the fox was back in his den seated at a banquet with his wife and the three baby foxes. “Life is looking up,” said Mrs Fox. “Now we will live happily ever after.” And they did.
  • 33. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction. Bulk licence deal contact Innes kennard at innesk@werc.ac.nz
  • 34. Work on building up the length and quality of the writing using captions as well as speech bubbles. Great as a precursor to teaching direct speech in text.
  • 35. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction.
  • 36. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction. http://moturoa.blogspot.com
  • 37. (A reading and writing activity) Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction.
  • 38. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction.
  • 39. http://www.kids-space.org/
  • 40. http://www.essortment.com/all/publishstories_rxvv.htm
  • 41. Intrinsic Incentive  Clearly purposeful.  For an audience.  That gets a result.  Where students experience success.  Where students take responsibility but get the support they need to get better.  Where students can see and measure their own progress and take responsibility for reflecting on that and reporting to parents. Authentic Feedback  Response.  Genuine reader reaction.  Critique and comment from a wide variety of readers.  Continued interaction.
  • 42. Child evaluation comments and feedback from listeners / readers. http://voicethread.com/#home
  • 43. Sign up, post an episode, create your podcast http://podomatic.com
  • 44. http://www.tki.org.nz/r/hot_topics/readandwrite_e.php
  • 45. http://www.kids-space.org/
  • 46. If kids can learn to read from The Bible, then they can learn to read from text beyond their decoding level. They just need support - of a good teacher, or other able students. There’s plenty of easy reading on the web.
  • 47. http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Home.html http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/chinesenewyear/
  • 48. http://science.howstuffworks.com/pulley.htm
  • 49. http://science.howstuffworks.com/submarine.htm
  • 50. http://elearningbop.wikispaces.com/Literacy+Progressions
  • 51. http://elearningbop.wikispaces.com/Literacy+Progressions
  • 52. www.alice.org
  • 53. We need to get creative and find ways to engage our struggling students in ways that provide intrinsic incentive, authentic feedback and the opportunity to read and express themselves on topics that interest them.
  • 54. Building capability, raising achievement For more information about workshops in the CORE Achieve programme, or to find out how you could engage with a CORE facilitator in your school, go to: Web: http://www.core-ed.org/services/achieve Email: achieve@core-ed.org Phone: (03) 348 6627 Jill Hammonds Core Education Ltd Jill.hammonds@core-ed.org Ph 021 344 253

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