CONNECTING THE QUANTITATE AND THE QUALITATIVE:    DATA DRIVEN MESSAGES THAT PERPETUATE      INTERNALIZED RACISM AND OTHERI...
SESSION OBJECTIVESFrame the relationship between data andinstitutional racismAnalyze how we internalize racialized message...
GROUND RULESListen to and respect each otherParticipate with an open mindAssume the best intentionsFocus only institutiona...
KEY CONCEPTSINSTITUTIONAL RACISM ... the routine, ofteninvisible and unintentional, production of inequitable policies,pra...
DATA: MORE THAN JUST NUMBERS      PROS               CONS     discovery            limited     analysis         oversimpli...
“The public conversation around race and academic   achievement has historically taken place before a  backdrop of slavery...
MEANING IN THE MESSAGESCRANIOMETRY   ACHIEVEMENT GAP
CYCLE OF RACIALIZED OUTCOMES
STUDENT DATA PROFILES
CYCLE OF SOCIALIZATIONBorn free of bias, blame, consciousness, and choicePersonal socializationInstitutional and cultural ...
RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 6 months: skin color differences are interestingBy 18 months: toddlers can place photos ofthemselve...
RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 5 years: core sense of racial/ethnic identity isdevelopedBy 6 years: likely to describe and explain...
RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 9 or 10: attitudes have solidified and remainunchanged unless a life-changing event challengesbelief...
MATTERING & MARGINALITY                           students “fail”                           academically and sociallyfeeli...
INTERNALIZED RACISMa complex, multi-generational process in whichpeople are subliminally socialized to accept, believe,and...
INTERNALIZED RACISMexperienced differently by targets and agentstargets experience internalized oppressionagents experienc...
INTERNALIZED OPPRESSIONEffects on Children              Effects on Adults   denial of reality             adaptation: exag...
INTERNALIZED PRIVILEGEEffects on Children           Effects on Adults   denial of reality          individualization   rat...
SOCIAL IDENTITY MAP       Agent                Oppression                  Target         Man                       sexism...
INTERNALIZED RACISM                  In Actionthe power to make and enforce decisionsaccess to resources, broadly definedth...
GATEKEEPERS CONTROL ACCESS.
THE POWER OF STORYpowerful, enduring meansof communicationcrosses culture andcommunityearliest learningexpereinces from st...
THE POWER OF STORY          relationship building          disrupt negative          racialized messaging          share p...
ALLYSHIPwhen a member of the dominant group works to endoppression in their personal and professional lifethrough support ...
BECOMING AN ALLY         Adversary                    AllyActive                Passive                        Active     ...
EDUCATORS AS ALLIESCreate a safe space in your classrooms and office.Allow students to name their own identities. Don’t ass...
TAKEAWAYS TO NOTE:Everyone has a story.Our stories are informed by our own perspectivesand experiences.The messenger is ju...
WWW.CORAJUS.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CORAJUS WWW.TWITTER.COM/BECORAJUS
REFERENCESBison, Julie. “Children and Youth’s Development in Understanding Race, Gender, Disability, and Class.” Adapated ...
Connecting the Quantitative and the Qualitative: Data Driven Messages that Perpetuate Internalized Oppression and “Othering”
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Connecting the Quantitative and the Qualitative: Data Driven Messages that Perpetuate Internalized Oppression and “Othering”

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Data is defined as “information in visible form.” But what information remains invisible? How and why does it matter? Education is all about messaging. Ultimately, the “invisible” messages we send and receive determine how we lead students to understand society and their place in it. Quantitative data is a tool of “othering.” It shapes the way we educate without taking into account the racialized systemic barriers students and teachers confront in the classroom. The popular education model used in social justice movements has proven that lived experiences matter just as much as any numerical statistic. Compassionate storytelling can empower the data you’re given, your leadership and your students.

This session will explore how racialized messaging is embedded in student data profiles as stories that frame an educator’s expectation of a student’s capacity to master specific content areas. Methodically collecting anecdotal information from your students can help you gain insight about what those numbers actually mean to your work and to their development. We will unpack the ways data messages reinforce internalized racism and subsequently impact our roles as gatekeepers. Your interpretation of the numbers is an opportunity to honor your students’ experience and show how those account matter more than the “flat” stories numbers often relay.

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  • Welcome\nIntro - RP - CPL, Corajus\n\n
  • RP\n
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  • RP: Intros - RP & MP\n
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  • “Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom”\n
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  • Education is said to be the great equalizer. What if I told you that education is actually the great normalizer? It represents the single institution that every single citizen is required by the government to enter. (Of course, we have the option to home school; but the vast majority of people attend traditional schools.) \n\nSocialization is the method by which we receive messages. Guess what?! it’s all data! Remember: data is defined as “information in invisible form.” Let’s take a closer look at how socialization works/happens.\n
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  • The cycle begins before we’re born. All of the mechanics, assumptions, roles, and structures of oppression are in place and functioning. Our identities are ascribed to us before our birth without our permission or choice. Our very first socialization informs our sense of self-perception, norms, rules, roles, and the future are shaped by the people who we love and trust the most--our families and teachers. \n\nWe are then inundated with stereotypical messages that shape how we think and what we believe about ourselves and others...it is woven into every structural thread of the fabric of our culture. It’s how we come to understand who’s treated better and worse. Meanwhile, these messages are reinforced by a system that rewards compliance and punishes nonconformity. The results have impacts on both the agents and the targets. We internalize the superiority or the inferiority.\n\nThe good news is that we have a choice. The choice to do nothing and repeat the cycle or the choice to build allyship and movements that create positive change for us all. Authentic relationships have the kind of depth that restore our humanity.\n
  • If messaging determines how you understand your identity, society’s perception of you, and subsequently your position/place in society, then your ideas about race (your own and that of your peers) has been subliminally and explicitly communicated.\n\nWhat’s more is that the messages you received about race from childhood until now are being transmitted to the students you teach.\n\nMessaging is like a dance of communication. ....Those with privilege lead .... We are all constantly sending and receiving signals taht have significant meaning...and it’s all data.\n
  • If messaging determines how you understand your identity, society’s perception of you, and subsequently your position/place in society, then your ideas about race (your own and that of your peers) has been subliminally and explicitly communicated.\n\nWhat’s more is that the messages you received about race from childhood until now are being transmitted to the students you teach.\n\nMessaging is like a dance of communication. ....Those with privilege lead .... We are all constantly sending and receiving signals taht have significant meaning...and it’s all data.\n
  • If messaging determines how you understand your identity, society’s perception of you, and subsequently your position/place in society, then your ideas about race (your own and that of your peers) has been subliminally and explicitly communicated.\n\nWhat’s more is that the messages you received about race from childhood until now are being transmitted to the students you teach.\n\nMessaging is like a dance of communication. ....Those with privilege lead .... We are all constantly sending and receiving signals taht have significant meaning...and it’s all data.\n
  • I grew up in a predominantly black, working class community in Philadelphia. I attended a small private school in my neighborhood where I excelled academically. One day I was called to the principal’s office and instructed to report to a different classroom for rest of the school year. According to the letter sent home to my parents, I was being skipped two grades from 2nd to 4th because of my ability grasp advanced concepts with ease.\n\nLater that school year, my family moved to a predominantly white, upper-middle class community in suburban Washington Township, New Jersey. My parents gave me the usual new school pep talk: behave, be yourself, and make new friends. But it was two weeks before I got the chance to take that sound advice. The administrators in my elementary school held me in the principal’s office for those initial two weeks, putting me through a battery of skills tests. Many of which I passed at first. It wasn’t until they started timing me, challenging me to complete hundreds of multiplication problems in 60 seconds or less that I began to fail.\n\nI remember my father asking me if I’d made any new friends yet. When I told him no because I hadn’t been to class, he and my mother took action. They argued that the school should honor my “skips”and that the reason my aptitude was being question was because I was one of 6 black students in the entire grade. In the end, the school placed me in third grade, not fouth, honoring one of my merit-based advancements.\n\nThe experience caused me to question my intelligence, my ability to succeed, and the ease with which I trust authority to see me for who I am. Though I didn’t have the words for it then, I now realize that I felt invalidated, insecure and marginalized. In essence, I was othered.\n
  • I grew up in a predominantly black, working class community in Philadelphia. I attended a small private school in my neighborhood where I excelled academically. One day I was called to the principal’s office and instructed to report to a different classroom for rest of the school year. According to the letter sent home to my parents, I was being skipped two grades from 2nd to 4th because of my ability grasp advanced concepts with ease.\n\nLater that school year, my family moved to a predominantly white, upper-middle class community in suburban Washington Township, New Jersey. My parents gave me the usual new school pep talk: behave, be yourself, and make new friends. But it was two weeks before I got the chance to take that sound advice. The administrators in my elementary school held me in the principal’s office for those initial two weeks, putting me through a battery of skills tests. Many of which I passed at first. It wasn’t until they started timing me, challenging me to complete hundreds of multiplication problems in 60 seconds or less that I began to fail.\n\nI remember my father asking me if I’d made any new friends yet. When I told him no because I hadn’t been to class, he and my mother took action. They argued that the school should honor my “skips”and that the reason my aptitude was being question was because I was one of 6 black students in the entire grade. In the end, the school placed me in third grade, not fouth, honoring one of my merit-based advancements.\n\nThe experience caused me to question my intelligence, my ability to succeed, and the ease with which I trust authority to see me for who I am. Though I didn’t have the words for it then, I now realize that I felt invalidated, insecure and marginalized. In essence, I was othered.\n
  • I grew up in a predominantly black, working class community in Philadelphia. I attended a small private school in my neighborhood where I excelled academically. One day I was called to the principal’s office and instructed to report to a different classroom for rest of the school year. According to the letter sent home to my parents, I was being skipped two grades from 2nd to 4th because of my ability grasp advanced concepts with ease.\n\nLater that school year, my family moved to a predominantly white, upper-middle class community in suburban Washington Township, New Jersey. My parents gave me the usual new school pep talk: behave, be yourself, and make new friends. But it was two weeks before I got the chance to take that sound advice. The administrators in my elementary school held me in the principal’s office for those initial two weeks, putting me through a battery of skills tests. Many of which I passed at first. It wasn’t until they started timing me, challenging me to complete hundreds of multiplication problems in 60 seconds or less that I began to fail.\n\nI remember my father asking me if I’d made any new friends yet. When I told him no because I hadn’t been to class, he and my mother took action. They argued that the school should honor my “skips”and that the reason my aptitude was being question was because I was one of 6 black students in the entire grade. In the end, the school placed me in third grade, not fouth, honoring one of my merit-based advancements.\n\nThe experience caused me to question my intelligence, my ability to succeed, and the ease with which I trust authority to see me for who I am. Though I didn’t have the words for it then, I now realize that I felt invalidated, insecure and marginalized. In essence, I was othered.\n
  • I grew up in a predominantly black, working class community in Philadelphia. I attended a small private school in my neighborhood where I excelled academically. One day I was called to the principal’s office and instructed to report to a different classroom for rest of the school year. According to the letter sent home to my parents, I was being skipped two grades from 2nd to 4th because of my ability grasp advanced concepts with ease.\n\nLater that school year, my family moved to a predominantly white, upper-middle class community in suburban Washington Township, New Jersey. My parents gave me the usual new school pep talk: behave, be yourself, and make new friends. But it was two weeks before I got the chance to take that sound advice. The administrators in my elementary school held me in the principal’s office for those initial two weeks, putting me through a battery of skills tests. Many of which I passed at first. It wasn’t until they started timing me, challenging me to complete hundreds of multiplication problems in 60 seconds or less that I began to fail.\n\nI remember my father asking me if I’d made any new friends yet. When I told him no because I hadn’t been to class, he and my mother took action. They argued that the school should honor my “skips”and that the reason my aptitude was being question was because I was one of 6 black students in the entire grade. In the end, the school placed me in third grade, not fouth, honoring one of my merit-based advancements.\n\nThe experience caused me to question my intelligence, my ability to succeed, and the ease with which I trust authority to see me for who I am. Though I didn’t have the words for it then, I now realize that I felt invalidated, insecure and marginalized. In essence, I was othered.\n
  • I grew up in a predominantly black, working class community in Philadelphia. I attended a small private school in my neighborhood where I excelled academically. One day I was called to the principal’s office and instructed to report to a different classroom for rest of the school year. According to the letter sent home to my parents, I was being skipped two grades from 2nd to 4th because of my ability grasp advanced concepts with ease.\n\nLater that school year, my family moved to a predominantly white, upper-middle class community in suburban Washington Township, New Jersey. My parents gave me the usual new school pep talk: behave, be yourself, and make new friends. But it was two weeks before I got the chance to take that sound advice. The administrators in my elementary school held me in the principal’s office for those initial two weeks, putting me through a battery of skills tests. Many of which I passed at first. It wasn’t until they started timing me, challenging me to complete hundreds of multiplication problems in 60 seconds or less that I began to fail.\n\nI remember my father asking me if I’d made any new friends yet. When I told him no because I hadn’t been to class, he and my mother took action. They argued that the school should honor my “skips”and that the reason my aptitude was being question was because I was one of 6 black students in the entire grade. In the end, the school placed me in third grade, not fouth, honoring one of my merit-based advancements.\n\nThe experience caused me to question my intelligence, my ability to succeed, and the ease with which I trust authority to see me for who I am. Though I didn’t have the words for it then, I now realize that I felt invalidated, insecure and marginalized. In essence, I was othered.\n
  • Transitions create feelings of uneasiness. (Nancy Schlossberg). People facing change question their ability to manage their transition...as well as what their new role will be. Students (just like me) experience this every time they enter new schools, new classrooms, new lunchrooms, new playgrounds with new teachers, principals, professors and classmates. And that’s normal.\n\nBut almost universally--without exception--in schools/workplaces there are people who are made to feel like they are the ones who really matter. They feel appreciated and are often (if, not regularly) sought out for projects, friendship, group work, and dodgeball teams. At the same time, some are made to feel like they are less important or insignificant. They are marginalized as “others”--and they know it.\n\nThere is a strong correlation between this concept and performance. Often, it eclipses skills and abilities. It happened to me. When people are marginalized their self-esteem and confidence are eroded, so they doubt their abilities and minimized their contributions.\n
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  • Now here’s what that means in practice. Internalized racism is experienced differently by targets (people of color) and agents (white people). Targets experience internalized oppression. Agents internalized their privilege. It’s important to note that most--if not ALL-- of the ways in which internalized racism plays out in UNCONSCIOUS because it’s how we’ve been socialized.\n
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  • how we internalize racism affects how we, in turn, interact with each other. it can lead us to “otherize” one another.\n\n“others” are deemed as such when they fail to fit into the dominant standard or when the dominant standard FAILS fit the others.\n\nit defines who matters and who’s marginalized and invites you to internalize those assignments.\n
  • Decision Making: Policy makers, students themselves,\nResources: the incorporation into institutional policies or practices of attitudes or values that work to the disadvantage of students of color (for example, differential \nStandards: the unquestioned acceptance by the institution of white-middle-class values (for example, the scarcity of authors of color in many secondary schools' English curricula)\nNaming the Problem: schools' being passive in the face of prejudiced behavior that interferes with students' learning or well-being (for example, not addressing harassment or teasing, or meeting it with punishment instead of attempting to build communication and understanding).\n
  • Let’s connect the idea of achieving racial justice with the actual work we do.  In spite of our different levels of experience, we are all GATEKEEPERS. What is a gatekeeper?  Someone who tends or guards a gate, letting people in and out.  A gatekeeper is a person who controls access. Educators are gatekeepers because information--and messages--flow through you like water through a faucet. You decide whether and how much to the open or close the spigot.  \n\nAs one of the chief agents of socialization, teachers control students’ access to: language and literacy, writing and arithmetic, grammar and promotion to the next grade. Educators facilitate students’ understanding of themselves, the world around them, and their place in it. \n\nTake a moment to consider your role as a gatekeeper. Now remember what it was like to be a student. Remember the messages you received from your teacher.  Could it have been based on your own data profile? What stories will you tell about the students you will teach?\n
  • Story is everywhere. Story is everything.\n\nStorytelling is an ideal teaching and learning tool. It takes seriously the need for students to make sense of experience, using their own culturally generated sense-making processes.\n
  • Stories may help teachers to reframe the negative racialized narratives they hear, while making them less prevalent. The rich, diverse, and often untold histories, life stories, and perspectives of people of color can provide opportunities for teachers to learn about and better understand students, families and their communities.\n\nThrough storytelling, educators may disrupt racist messages that students of color often receive in predominantly White settings.\n\nLastly, storytelling serves as a means for both educators and students to carve out spaces to share personal experiences.\n
  • Take a look at this picture? What’s happening here?\nIn 1967, KATHERINE SWITZER became the first woman to enter and run the Boston Marathon. Her entry made history not only because she was the first to do this but because a race official (the gentleman behind her in this picture) forcibly tried to remove her from the competition. Her boyfriend at the time (the gentleman to her right) jumped in to fend him off to allow her to run. The other (male) runners around her, surrounding her for the remainder of the race like a human shield. They finished the race together. This, my friends, is allyship.\n
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  • Michaela and I co-founded an initiative aimed at impacting race-based disparities by unpacking institutional racism, policy by policy, organization by organization, leader by leader. \n\nThe Coalition for Racial Justice was founded with three ideas in mind. First, achieving racial justice will require a synthesis of individual, institutional & systemic change. Our approach hinges on analyzing how we have internalized racialized messaging. Lastly, we recognize the need for academics & advocates to work together in this activism. If you’re interested in learning more, please visit our website at www.corajus.com. You can also like us on facebook and follow us on twitter!\n\nWe thank you for sharing this time with us today. Please complete an evaluation before you leave. We’d love to have your feedback. \n\n\n\n\n
  • Keheler, Terry. “Racial Equity Impact Assessments: An Overview.” Applied Research Center (2009).\n\nHarro, Bobbie. “Cycle of Socialization.” Referenced in Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, 2nd edition by Adams, Blumenfeld, Casteneda, Hackman, Peters, and Zuniga (2010).\n\nBison, Julie. “Children and Youth’s Development in Understanding Race, Gender, Disability, and Class.” Adapted by Cultures Connecting (2012).\n\nNiccol, Andrew, dir. “Gattaca.” Film (1997).\n\nSchlossberg, Nancy. “Marginality and Mattering: Key Issues in Building Community.”\n\n“Mattering & Marginality Team Activity.” ProGroup Managers Toolkit (2004).\n\nBivens, Donna. “Internalized Racism: a definition.” Women’s Theological Center (1995).\n\nDerman-Sparks, Louise and the ABC Task Force, Stacy York, Elizabeth Jones, and The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond. “Racism and Its Effects/Impacts on us All.”\n\nEck, Sally. “Social Identity Mapping.” Women’s Studies, Portland State University.\n\nRodriguez, Dalia. “Storytelling in the Field: Race, Method, and the Empowerment of Latina College Students.” Cultural Studies, Vol. 10, No. 6 (2010).\n\nLee, Rosetta Eun Ryong. “Privilege and Allyship: Owning Our Stuff and Taking Action.” WPC Symposium(2011).\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • Connecting the Quantitative and the Qualitative: Data Driven Messages that Perpetuate Internalized Oppression and “Othering”

    1. 1. CONNECTING THE QUANTITATE AND THE QUALITATIVE: DATA DRIVEN MESSAGES THAT PERPETUATE INTERNALIZED RACISM AND OTHERING EQUITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE APRIL 28, 2012 MICHAELA POMMELLS & REAGEN PRICE COALITION FOR RACIAL JUSTICE
    2. 2. SESSION OBJECTIVESFrame the relationship between data andinstitutional racismAnalyze how we internalize racialized messagesPosition educators as student allies
    3. 3. GROUND RULESListen to and respect each otherParticipate with an open mindAssume the best intentionsFocus only institutional racism, not interpersonalracism or any other “isms”
    4. 4. KEY CONCEPTSINSTITUTIONAL RACISM ... the routine, ofteninvisible and unintentional, production of inequitable policies,practices, social opportunities and outcomes based on racewithin institutions.INTENT vs. IMPACT ... when the adverse affect of apractice or standard is neutral and non-discriminatory in itsintention but, nonetheless, disproportionately affects individualsbelonging to a particular racial group.
    5. 5. DATA: MORE THAN JUST NUMBERS PROS CONS discovery limited analysis oversimplified tell a story biasedpersonal connection negative impact
    6. 6. “The public conversation around race and academic achievement has historically taken place before a backdrop of slavery, Jim Crow, and a host of historical and contemporary practices and cultural icons that give the conversation meaning, a meaning that almost always reinforces our nation’s ideology about black intellectual inferiority.” Lisa Delpit
    7. 7. MEANING IN THE MESSAGESCRANIOMETRY ACHIEVEMENT GAP
    8. 8. CYCLE OF RACIALIZED OUTCOMES
    9. 9. STUDENT DATA PROFILES
    10. 10. CYCLE OF SOCIALIZATIONBorn free of bias, blame, consciousness, and choicePersonal socializationInstitutional and cultural socializationMessages reinforcedMessages internalizedCHOICE: Do something different or Do nothing
    11. 11. RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 6 months: skin color differences are interestingBy 18 months: toddlers can place photos ofthemselves in their racial/ethnic groupBy 2 years: curiosity about differencesBetween 2.5-3.5 years: awareness and absorption ofprevailing negative stereotypes
    12. 12. RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 5 years: core sense of racial/ethnic identity isdevelopedBy 6 years: likely to describe and explain poverty andwealth in observable concrete termsBy 6, 7, and 8 years: cognitively understand theinfluence of socially stereotypes on them
    13. 13. RACIALIZED MESSAGINGBy 9 or 10: attitudes have solidified and remainunchanged unless a life-changing event challengesbeliefsBy 11 of 12: interest in world events, ancestry,history, and geography makes for better “perspectivetaking”By adolescence: see the unequal distribution of wealthbut blame poor people for their poverty
    14. 14. MATTERING & MARGINALITY students “fail” academically and sociallyfeeling that one belongs when they feeland matters to others marginalizedpromotes a healthy and feeling that one does notsuccessful transition fit itstudents succeed produces selfbecause they feel valued consciousness that leads to an inability to perform like normal
    15. 15. INTERNALIZED RACISMa complex, multi-generational process in whichpeople are subliminally socialized to accept, believe,and maintain negative social definitions in such a waythat they support and maintain the contruct ofracialized dominant culture
    16. 16. INTERNALIZED RACISMexperienced differently by targets and agentstargets experience internalized oppressionagents experience internalized privilege
    17. 17. INTERNALIZED OPPRESSIONEffects on Children Effects on Adults denial of reality adaptation: exaggerated visibility or invisibility overidentification with with people distancing separation and alienation assimilation confusion and bewilderment colorism rejection protectionism shame mimicry anger and rage ethnocentrism
    18. 18. INTERNALIZED PRIVILEGEEffects on Children Effects on Adults denial of reality individualization rationalization denial and ignorance rigid thinking tolerance superiority guilt learning fear and hatred fear double standards blaming the victim ill prepared
    19. 19. SOCIAL IDENTITY MAP Agent Oppression Target Man sexism Woman Wealthy / Upper Class classism Poor / Working ClassTemporarily Able-Bodied ablism Alter-Abled White racism Person of Color Heterosexual heterosexism Queer Cisgender trans oppression Transgender/sexual “Of Appropriate Age” ageism “Too Old” “Of Appropriate Age” adultism “Too Young” Gentile anti-Jewish oppression Jewish Christian religious imperialism Not Christian “Of Appropriate Size” sizism “Fat” English Speaking ethnocentrism ESL Born in US nativism Not Born in US Media Beauty lookism No Media Beauty
    20. 20. INTERNALIZED RACISM In Actionthe power to make and enforce decisionsaccess to resources, broadly definedthe ability to set and determine standards for whatis considered appropriate behaviorthe ability to define reality
    21. 21. GATEKEEPERS CONTROL ACCESS.
    22. 22. THE POWER OF STORYpowerful, enduring meansof communicationcrosses culture andcommunityearliest learningexpereinces from storiesmake sense of the world
    23. 23. THE POWER OF STORY relationship building disrupt negative racialized messaging share personal experiences
    24. 24. ALLYSHIPwhen a member of the dominant group works to endoppression in their personal and professional lifethrough support of and advocacy with the oppressed
    25. 25. BECOMING AN ALLY Adversary AllyActive Passive Active 1 2 3 4 5 6 Actively Initiate an No Educate Interrupt Interruptjoins in the organized response oneself the behavior and educate negative response
    26. 26. EDUCATORS AS ALLIESCreate a safe space in your classrooms and office.Allow students to name their own identities. Don’t assume their raceor ethnic background.Confront offensive remarks, including slights and slur that youoverhear.Seek opportunities to incorporate the contributions of people ofcolor in your curriculum.If your school has affinity groups or clubs, volunteer to serve as itsfaculty advisor or contribute in other ways.Organize or encourage district administrators to coordinateopportunities for anti-racist capacity building.
    27. 27. TAKEAWAYS TO NOTE:Everyone has a story.Our stories are informed by our own perspectivesand experiences.The messenger is just as critical to the power of thestory as the narrative itself.Interrupt critically. Relate accordingly.
    28. 28. WWW.CORAJUS.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CORAJUS WWW.TWITTER.COM/BECORAJUS
    29. 29. REFERENCESBison, Julie. “Children and Youth’s Development in Understanding Race, Gender, Disability, and Class.” Adapated byCultures Connecting (2012).Bivens, Donna. “Internalized Racism: a definition.” Women’s Theological Center (1995).Derman-Sparks, Louise and the ABC Task Force, Stacy York, Elizabeth Jones, and The People’s Institute for Survival andBeyond. “Racism and Its Effects/Impacts on us All.”“Dismantling Racism: A Resource Book for Social Change Groups.” Western States Center (2003).Eck, Sally. “Social Identity Mapping” Women’s Studies, Portland State University.Harro, Bobbie. “Cycle of Socialization.” Referenced in Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, 2nd ed. by Adams, et al.(2010).“Katherine Switzer, 1967 Boston Marathon.” AP Images/Worldwide Photo. www.marathonwoman.com.Keheler, Terry. “Racial Equity Impact Assessments: An Overview.” Applied Research Center (2009).Lee, Rosetta Eun Ryong. “Privilege and Allyship: Owning Our Stuff and Taking Action.” WPC Symposium (2011).“Mattering & Marginality Team Activity.” ProGroup Managers Toolkit (2004).Niccol, Andrew, dir. “Gattaca.” Film (1997).Rodriguez, Dalia. “Storytelling in the Field: Race, Method, and the Empowerment of Latina College Students.” CulturalStudies,Vol. 10, No. 6 (2010).Schlossberg, Nancy. “Marginality and Mattering: Key Issues in Building Community.”

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