Empowering the Cooperative Movement
through Advocacy Education
Dr. Maria José Novoa
Senior Associate, NCBA CLUSA
ICA Globa...
MOZAMBIQUE MAP
MOZAMBIQUE

Key Facts
MOZAMBIQUE

POPULATION
0-14 YEARS: 44.3%
• male 4,829,272/female 4,773,209

15-64 YEARS: 52.8%
• male 5,605,227/female 5,8...
MOZAMBIQUE
• Poverty headcount ratio at national
poverty line (% of population)

• Life expectancy at birth, total (years)...
MOZAMBIQUE

Mozambican cooperatives were a classic
case of cooperative development under
socialism.

We started a long pro...
MOZAMBIQUE

• The National Cooperative
Business Association
(NCBA), through its CLUSA international
program, has been work...
MOZAMBIQUE

• Associations soon became a way for a group
to incorporate and work toward a common
goal together
• But the l...
Understanding the differences
between
cooperatives, associations , and
business enterprises, their
different assumptions, ...
FROM SMALL TO LARGE, ADDING VALUE

We started with a small but highly
interested group of people concerned
about the need ...
FOLK DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION & DEMOCRACY

• Study circles are very suitable for civil society.
• Democracy is very much emph...
KEY CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDY CIRCLES
1. Participation is voluntary.
2. There is typically open access to study circles – o...
ADVOCACY STRATEGY
• BRAZILIANS INVITED TO
COME TO TELL THEIR
STORY

• DIRECTLY ENGAGE WITH
POLICYMAKERS AT ALL
LEVELS

INS...
RECRUITING LAWYERS
•

GROUP DISCUSSIONS

• We recruited one Mozambican
lawyer and two foreign lawyers to
review the first ...
DIALOGUE
•

Political parties, banks, companies

•

Students, intellectuals

•

• Through absolute dedication to
dialogue ...
ADVOCACY STRATEGY CHANGES
•

•

•

In the field

In trade shows

In the media

• Mobilizing key groups around the
benefits...
MEDIA STRATEGY / MAKING A NATIONAL CAMPAIGN
•

Community radios

•

TV News

•

Linking the former President with Co-ops

...
•

Exhibitions

•

PROMOTING COOPERATIVE PRODUCTS

Partnerships, alliances, and
coalitions are key to making the
connectio...
ABSOLUTE DEDICATION
•

CONFERENCES

Promote awareness of the cooperative
model and new regulations among
target audiences....
CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT
•

Final delivery to parliament

•

Approved by unanimity and acclamation

CONSENSUS VERSION OF
DRAFT...
“On behalf of this parliament, I would like to thank NCBA
and the civil society group for their civic initiative and for
t...
FROM A STUDY CIRCLE TO A CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION
•

THE CONSTITUTION OF A FORMAL ENTITY

• We started our process with ...
Maria José Novoa
mnovoa1952@gmail.com
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Ms Maria Jose Novoa : Empowering the co-operative movement through advocacy education

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Ms Maria Jose Novoa , Senior Associate for CLUSA International- Cooperative Rural Develpoment, Mozambique at the International Co-operative Alliance Global Conference in Cape Town, November 2013.

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Ms Maria Jose Novoa : Empowering the co-operative movement through advocacy education

  1. 1. Empowering the Cooperative Movement through Advocacy Education Dr. Maria José Novoa Senior Associate, NCBA CLUSA ICA Global Conference & General Assembly Cape Town, South Africa
  2. 2. MOZAMBIQUE MAP
  3. 3. MOZAMBIQUE Key Facts
  4. 4. MOZAMBIQUE POPULATION 0-14 YEARS: 44.3% • male 4,829,272/female 4,773,209 15-64 YEARS: 52.8% • male 5,605,227/female 5,842,679 65 YEARS AND OVER: 2.9% • male 257,119/ female 361,772 (2009 est.)
  5. 5. MOZAMBIQUE • Poverty headcount ratio at national poverty line (% of population) • Life expectancy at birth, total (years) • Literacy rate, adult total (% of people ages 15 and above) • Economy MOZAMBI QUE agriculture: 29.5% industry: 23.9% services: 46.5% (2012 est.) GNI Per capita: US$510 GDP: US$14.59 billion (2012)
  6. 6. MOZAMBIQUE Mozambican cooperatives were a classic case of cooperative development under socialism. We started a long process of change
  7. 7. MOZAMBIQUE • The National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA), through its CLUSA international program, has been working in Mozambique since 1995, when the socialist era ended. • At that point in time, “cooperative” was a pejorative term associated with government control, so NCBA had to strategically devise another way to promote working together, collective marketing, and group business entities.
  8. 8. MOZAMBIQUE • Associations soon became a way for a group to incorporate and work toward a common goal together • But the legal framework did not provide space for associations and other groups to market and sell their crops legally as a business enterprise.
  9. 9. Understanding the differences between cooperatives, associations , and business enterprises, their different assumptions, concepts and roles, has been a long and participative discovery from bottom to top.
  10. 10. FROM SMALL TO LARGE, ADDING VALUE We started with a small but highly interested group of people concerned about the need for change and involved in the co-op movement. We started studying in a informal way, seated where ever possible, first with CLARITY concepts and then internet research on good practices. We found fantastic stories about new approaches to cooperatives from around the world.
  11. 11. FOLK DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION & DEMOCRACY • Study circles are very suitable for civil society. • Democracy is very much emphasized these days in the world of international development cooperation. Adult education is not. When democratic development is supported by donor countries, the emphasis is on democratic infrastructure, while little is done to increase the possibilities of ordinary citizens to become well-informed and active in the process of building democracy at the local level. No real democracy can be established without democratic citizens. • In a participative methodology participants take an active part in the study process.
  12. 12. KEY CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDY CIRCLES 1. Participation is voluntary. 2. There is typically open access to study circles – one does not have to have any qualifications to participate. 3. There are limited number of persons in a circle, normally somewhere between 5 - 10 persons. 4. Persons of different ages are mixed in the circles. 5. Study circles often meet 3 hours once a week 6. Study circles are organized by the participants, i.e. they choose the topic, leader, etc. 7. A circle can be led by a leader, who does not have to be an expert – in fact it may be one of the participants. On the other hand, experts often act as leaders. 8. Participants should have an equal share of the conversation. The atmosphere should be informal. 9. Study circles can be linked to various political, religious and social interests and perspectives. 10. There are typically no examinations. 11. The ability to listen and recognize to the contributions of others is fundamental in the study circle philosophy.
  13. 13. ADVOCACY STRATEGY • BRAZILIANS INVITED TO COME TO TELL THEIR STORY • DIRECTLY ENGAGE WITH POLICYMAKERS AT ALL LEVELS INSTEAD OF TALKING ABOUT THE NEGATIVE PAST AND THE MISTAKES MADE … We started to disseminate successful cooperative stories from around the world to demonstrate that other countries – even ones with a similar history of colonialism or socialism – can and are creating an enabling environment for the successful and democratic functioning of cooperatives.
  14. 14. RECRUITING LAWYERS • GROUP DISCUSSIONS • We recruited one Mozambican lawyer and two foreign lawyers to review the first draft cooperative law we had in mind. Once the draft was finished, we started one year of public debates and discussions. • In this process, the lawyers were our supporters and facilitators. They were part of the whole process. • Through discussions at all levels we improved the proposed new cooperative law. Everybody could contribute and feel we respected their contributions.
  15. 15. DIALOGUE • Political parties, banks, companies • Students, intellectuals • • Through absolute dedication to dialogue and inclusion of all parts of society, from civil society to those in economic and political power and intellectual opinionleaders, from North to South, from the supporters to opponents, from all economic sectors including banks, private sector business, political parties and so on... • Listening to and understanding our oponents was a means to clarify doubts and educate, and a way to bring greater consensus on the draft law. Farmers • I • The development process must be organic and follow the course desired by the Mozambicans themselves.
  16. 16. ADVOCACY STRATEGY CHANGES • • • In the field In trade shows In the media • Mobilizing key groups around the benefits of cooperatives • Focus on target audiences and promote the process as a domestic one as much as possible, with only the necessary and consensual overseas involvement. • Partnerships, alliances and coalitions are key to making connections and having an organic advocacy program.
  17. 17. MEDIA STRATEGY / MAKING A NATIONAL CAMPAIGN • Community radios • TV News • Linking the former President with Co-ops • Using all media, including community radio, television newscasts, and advertising in newspapers front page bottom section
  18. 18. • Exhibitions • PROMOTING COOPERATIVE PRODUCTS Partnerships, alliances, and coalitions are key to making the connections and having an organic advocacy program. • Showing the power of cooperatives • Work with people and not for the people  This is absolutely crucial • Engaging decision makers
  19. 19. ABSOLUTE DEDICATION • CONFERENCES Promote awareness of the cooperative model and new regulations among target audiences. Demonstrate dynamism within the cooperative sector in order to strengthen the notion of cooperatives as a wide-reaching, sustainable economic model of development. Increase credibility and legitimacy of the cooperative model. Link cooperatives and associations and their goods/services with external markets, supporting government agencies and potential funders.
  20. 20. CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT • Final delivery to parliament • Approved by unanimity and acclamation CONSENSUS VERSION OF DRAFT NATIONAL COOPERATIVE LAW DELIVERED TO PARLIAMENT
  21. 21. “On behalf of this parliament, I would like to thank NCBA and the civil society group for their civic initiative and for the way they have conducted this process. For the first time, together we have created a law which came from civil society. This proves that together we can build and develop our country.” Drª Verónica Nataniel Macamo Dlhovo The President of the Assembly of the Republic of Mozambique April 30, 2009
  22. 22. FROM A STUDY CIRCLE TO A CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION • THE CONSTITUTION OF A FORMAL ENTITY • We started our process with few coalition partners, mainly from the agro-business sector. • We worked together as an informal task force team. • Following a strategy of inclusion and wide vision, step by step, as a result of our initiatives we brought together more and more organisations from different economic sectors and regions. Mozambican Association for Modern Cooperative Promotion ( AMPCM ) • Now we are a legal entity promoting the new cooperative law and model through the Mozambican Association for Modern Cooperative Promotion (AMPCM) and in the long term to turn it into a National Cooperative League.
  23. 23. Maria José Novoa mnovoa1952@gmail.com

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