ICTs for social and economic development

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Daniel Annerose, CEO

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ICTs for social and economic development

  1. 1. ICTs forsocial and economicdevelopment<br />Daniel Annerose, CEO<br />
  2. 2. Manobi-Holding<br />2008, MauritiusFinance2 people<br />Mobile 2 Web Value Added Business Services Operator<br /><ul><li>Sectors
  3. 3. Agribusiness
  4. 4. E-governance
  5. 5. Location base services
  6. 6. Machine metering
  7. 7. E-Marketing
  8. 8. Expertise
  9. 9. Mobile multi-channel data (Wap, iMode, VoiceXML, SMS, Internet)
  10. 10. Creation, development, integration, operation & provision of VAS on GSM network
  11. 11. 100% Open Source
  12. 12. References
  13. 13. World-Best e-Inclusion Project (WSIS, 2003)
  14. 14. Top African ICT Company (AAA, 2004)</li></ul>Manobi-Senegal<br />2003, DakarOperation & Sales15 people<br />Manobi-South Africa<br />2004, JohannesburgOperation & Sales<br />2 people<br />Manobi Development FoundationNot for profit<br />2006, Pasadena2 people<br />
  15. 15. Africa, the fastest growing mobile market<br /><ul><li>+ 50% of Africa’s 950 million people will use cell phones (BroadGroup)
  16. 16. 70% of them will live in rural areas (World Bank)</li></ul>2011<br />
  17. 17. Production<br />Processing<br />Logistics<br />Retail<br />Customer<br />Weaknesses & risks in a value chain<br /><ul><li>Farm management
  18. 18. Climate changes
  19. 19. Input quality & supply
  20. 20. Pests
  21. 21. Credit access
  22. 22. Market demand
  23. 23. Payment delays
  24. 24. Process Unit supply
  25. 25. Product quality
  26. 26. Power supply failures
  27. 27. Process management
  28. 28. Transportation delays
  29. 29. Handling incidents
  30. 30. Cold chain failures
  31. 31. Quality insurance
  32. 32. Safety insurance
  33. 33. Fairness
  34. 34. Supply – Logistic
  35. 35. Risk management
  36. 36. Traceability</li></li></ul><li>Weaknesses in agribusiness in Africa<br />SUPPLIERS<br /><ul><li>Numerous and splitted relationships
  37. 37. No shared and powerful interactive communication systems.
  38. 38. Poor visibility of the reality of activity of small farmers
  39. 39. High cost management
  40. 40. Limited performances
  41. 41. Poor profitability</li></ul>FARMERS<br />BUYERS<br />Today<br />
  42. 42. Linking Small business 2 Large business<br />SMALL<br /> BUSINESSES<br />LARGE BUSINESSES<br />With Manobi Services<br />
  43. 43. Manobi improves the value agri-chain<br />
  44. 44. Three case studies<br /><ul><li>Linkages to local market
  45. 45. Linkages to national markets
  46. 46. Linkages to export markets</li></li></ul><li>Market knowledge increases everyone’s income<br /><ul><li>Modou Seck waits for the middleman at the gate of his farm.
  47. 47. He doesn’t know his product’s value is on the end market
  48. 48. He can only negotiate with the information the middleman gives him!</li></ul>But with T2M…<br /><ul><li>He checks the market price on his cell phone.
  49. 49. He shows the screen to the middleman
  50. 50. They negotiate a fair price as business peers
  51. 51. He increases his annual revenue by $750 per acre, doubling his income.
  52. 52. The middleman wins, too, because he now uses T2M to choose the best end market to get for himself the highest price.</li></li></ul><li>Wap<br />SMS<br />MMS<br />Mobile Internet<br />Web<br />T2M, the Market Information System<br />
  53. 53. Better Linkages Improve Revenue<br /><ul><li>Karaya gum producers have a contract to supply local exporters.
  54. 54. Exporters argued that since they don’t know what inventory is available, they can’t carry enough cash to pay farmers at the point of sale.
  55. 55. So the producers were obliged to sell to local middlemen instead, but at a lower price.</li></ul>But with ²GIS + T2M…<br /><ul><li>Gum growers have adedicated system with PDA/GPRS/GSM to record their inventory
  56. 56. Inventory stocks are displayed on the exporter’s screen on a mobile GIS map.
  57. 57. Exporters optimize their collection logistics and save money.
  58. 58. Gum growers sell at higher prices directly to exporters paid cash on delivery — and increase their business income by 40% to 50%.</li></li></ul><li>Produce traceability yields global markets<br /><ul><li>Mango growers and exporters in Mali and Senegal faced trade barriers preventing access to Northern markets.
  59. 59. They were totally dependent on the importer who only acted as an “agent”, leaving the Malians to carry all the transport and ripening risks that they had no control over.
  60. 60. Their market system was not robust enough to promote their products profitably on foreign markets </li></ul>But… with “Fresh Food Trace”…<br /><ul><li>Malian & Senegalese mango growers have a mobile to internet system to post complete product information for their partners and customers
  61. 61. Every single action touching the mango—from the field to the fork—is logged onto a mobile device.
  62. 62. Complete product traceability is guaranteed to importers, retailers, customers.
  63. 63. The end market, not the farmer, readily pays 9 cents per pound of fruit to have individual farm sourcing… and the guarantee of food safety standards.</li></li></ul><li>Income<br />Mobility<br />Web<br />SMS/MMS<br />Voice<br />WAP<br />I-Mob.<br />Our vision<br />Manobi turns the mobile phone into a business tool<br /><ul><li>We develop local contents and services for all business players in their own value chains.
  64. 64. We create a unique convergence between the Mobile Network & Internet to provide to our clients access and data exchange on business pricing and logistics anytime and anywhere.
  65. 65. We use technology to deliver user-centered services and content for every business, no matter what its size.
  66. 66. We push the envelope of network flexibility to deliver efficient e-tools to all our clients
  67. 67. We generate social development through the increase of income of our clients</li></li></ul><li>Example : Our MIS initiative<br /><ul><li>Improving market linkages and income of small and vulnerable farmers
  68. 68. i.e : 650 000 vulnerable W&C African farmers to transform in profitable agri-businesses</li></li></ul><li>A dedicated package for the SVFs<br /><ul><li>A mobile phone 20$
  69. 69. Acces to network
  70. 70. Sim Card
  71. 71. Air time
  72. 72. Business services
  73. 73. A community based support
  74. 74. Communities Business Promoters
  75. 75. Ladies Phones</li></ul>3rd partiesServices<br />On demand Services<br />Basic Services<br />
  76. 76. Free MIS for Africanfarmers<br />Private sector<br />Public support<br /><ul><li>Mobile Operators
  77. 77. Agricultural Banks
  78. 78. Large Agribusinesses companies
  79. 79. Retailers,…
  80. 80. IDRC
  81. 81. SDC
  82. 82. InfoDev/Worldbank
  83. 83. Hewlett Foundation
  84. 84. USAID,
  85. 85. NGOs…</li></ul>Millenium Development Goal (?)<br />Scaling up<br />Assessmentprojects<br />Pilots<br />R&D<br />2000<br />2005<br />2010<br />2015<br />
  86. 86. For their economic & social development<br />Agriculture<br />Water & Sanitation Access<br />Child Protection & Education<br />Artisan fishery<br />Local Governments<br />Health & Environment<br />
  87. 87. A win-win ecosytem<br /><ul><li>A user-centric strategy
  88. 88. Local content for local needs
  89. 89. Specific & profitable new business models for sustainability
  90. 90. Improvement of value chain performance
  91. 91. Job and enterprise creation
  92. 92. Increase of rural population well being</li></ul>Large players<br />Mobile Operators<br />Development agencies<br />
  93. 93. Cooperation 2.0 to 3.0?<br />Thankyou<br />Daniel Annerose<br />CEO<br />daniel.annerose@manobi.net<br />Office : + 221 33 869 2050<br />www.manobi.net<br />

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