Learning at Home: Families' Educational Media Use at Home

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On January 24, 2014 the Joan Ganz Cooney Center released the results of a national survey of more than 1500 parents of children ages 2-10 to find out how much of children’s media time is devoted to …

On January 24, 2014 the Joan Ganz Cooney Center released the results of a national survey of more than 1500 parents of children ages 2-10 to find out how much of children’s media time is devoted to educational content, platform by platform, age by age. These slides were presented by Michael Levine and Vicky Rideout to introduce the Families and Media Project and provide key highlights from the report.

Learning at Home: Families’ Educational Media Use in America is the first comprehensive analysis of parents’ experiences with the educational media their children use: Which subjects do parents feel their children are learning the most about from media? Which platforms do they perceive as being most effective? And what are some of the obstacles to greater use of educational media? All of these issues are explored by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The report measures the degree to which children and parents use media together, overall and by platform, and looks at how this joint media engagement changes as children get older. The study also examines children’s reading behaviors, especially online or on electronic reading devices.

The report was authored by Victoria Rideout, and conducted with the generous support of the Bezos Family Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, AARP, and the LIFE Center as part of the Families and Media Project.

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  • 1. Learning  at  Home:  Families’   Educa6onal  Media  Use  in  America   A  Joan  Ganz  Cooney  Center  Forum   January  24,  2014  
  • 2. Learning  at  Home:  Families’   Educa6onal  Media  Use  in  America   Michael  H.  Levine   Execu<ve  Director,  Joan  Ganz  Cooney  Center   January  24,  2014  
  • 3. The  Families  and  Media  Project  
  • 4. The  Families  and  Media  Project   The  LIFE  Center:  Stevens  &  Penuel,  2010   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 5. Ecological  Perspec<ve  on  Learning   Attitudes & Ideologies Parents’ Work Local School System Mass Media Church, Library, After-school Spaces Cultural Values School, Teachers, Peers Home, Parents, Siblings Digital Media Market Digital Media Spaces The Neighborhood Government Agencies Dominant Beliefs National & State Policy Bronfenbrenner  (1979);  Takeuchi  (2011)   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014   5  
  • 6. The  Families  and  Media  Project   Project  Priori<es:   •  Research  in  real  life  seTngs     •  Quan6ta6ve  and  qualita6ve  methods   •  Underserved  popula6ons    (especially  Hispanic-­‐La6no  families)   Research  Partners:   •  The  Joan  Ganz  Cooney  Center   •  LIFE,  AARP,  Northwestern,  Rutgers,  Stanford,  Arizona  State,  Sesame  Workshop   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 7. The  Families  and  Media  Project   Why:    Yield  knowledge  that  will  enable  parents  and  educators  to  harness  the  poten6al   that  media—when  used  in  though`ul  combina6on  with  human  resources—have  for   learning   What:    A  series  of  studies  on  modern-­‐day  media  use  across  diverse  families  with   children  ages  2-­‐12   •  Na6onal  survey   •  Regional  family  field  studies   •  Longitudinal  outcomes  study   Outcomes:     •  S6mulate  na6onal  ac6on   •  Inform  policy  on  digital  equity,  family  engagement,  and  educa6on  reform   •  Inform  design  of  media  and  media-­‐based  interven6ons  and  curricula   •  Resources  for  parents  and  educators  to  increase  the  amount/quality  of   interac6ons  around  media   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 8. Learning  at  Home:  Families’   Educa6onal  Media  Use  in  America   A  Joan  Ganz  Cooney  Center  Forum   January  24,  2014  
  • 9. PURPOSE  OF  THE  STUDY   n  Measure  how  much  of  children’s  screen  media  use  is  educa6onal     v By  pla`orm  and  by  age   n  Explore  which  pla`orms  parents  think  are  effec6ve   n  Discover  which  subjects  parents  think  children  are  learning  about  through   media   n  Measure  how  much  screen  media  use  occurs  with  parents   n  Document  pagerns  of  reading  and  e-­‐reading   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 10. METHODOLOGY   n  Sample  size:  1,577   n  Parents  of  children  ages  2-­‐10  years  old   n  Large  oversamples  of  Black  (290)  and  Hispanic/La6no  parents  (682)   n  Online  probability-­‐based  survey   v Panel  recruited  through  address-­‐based  sampling  and  RDD   v Those  without  Internet  connec6on  are  given  one   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 11. METHODOLOGY   n  Based  on  parents’  reports  of:     v  Which  media  are  educa6onal,  and   v  How  much  their  children  have  learned  from  it   n  Defini6on:  Media  that  is  “good  for  your  child’s  learning  or  growth,  or  that   teaches  some  type  of  lesson,  such  as  an  academic  or  social  skill.”   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 12. PARENTS'  OPINIONS  OF  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  parents  of  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  say  each  is  "very"  educa6onal:   Sesame  Street   58%   35%   Dora  the  Explorer   Mickey  Mouse  Clubhouse   SpongeBob  SquarePants   24%   2%   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 13. MANY  CHILDREN  ARE  USING     EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  use  educa6onal  media:   Less  than  weekly/   not  at  all   20%   Weekly   46%   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   Daily   34%   80%     Use  at   least  weekly  
  • 14. PARENTS  BELIEVE  THEIR  CHILDREN  ARE  LEARNING   FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   SUBJECTS  CHILDREN  HAVE  LEARNED  "A  LOT"  ABOUT  FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  whose  parents  say  they  have   learned  "a  lot"  from  any  pla`orm  about:   Cognitive  skills   37%   Reading/vocabulary   37%   28%   Math   Social  skills   25%   21%   Health  habits   19%   Science   Arts  and  culture   One  or  more  subject   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   15%   57%  
  • 15. PARENTS  BELIEVE  THEIR  CHILDREN  ARE  LEARNING   FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   SUBJECTS  CHILDREN  HAVE  LEARNED  "A  LOT"  ABOUT  FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  whose  parents  say  they  have   learned  "a  lot"  from  any  pla`orm  about:   Cognitive  skills   37%   Reading/vocabulary   37%   28%   Math   Social  skills   25%   21%   Health  habits   19%   Science   Arts  and  culture   One  or  more  subject   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   15%   57%  
  • 16. PARENTS  BELIEVE  THEIR  CHILDREN  ARE  LEARNING   FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   SUBJECTS  CHILDREN  HAVE  LEARNED  "A  LOT"  ABOUT  FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  whose  parents  say  they  have   learned  "a  lot"  from  any  pla`orm  about:   Cognitive  skills   37%   Reading/vocabulary   37%   28%   Math   Social  skills   25%   21%   Health  habits   19%   Science   Arts  and  culture   One  or  more  subject   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   15%   57%  
  • 17. MANY  CHILDREN  EXTEND  LEARNING  OFF  SCREEN   ACTIONS  TAKEN  DUE  TO  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA  USE   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  who  "olen":   Talk  about  something  they  saw  in  educational  media   38%   34%   Engage  in  imaginative  play  based  on  educational  media   Ask  questions  about  content  in  educational  media   Ask  to  do  an  activity  inspired  by  educational  meda   Teach  their  parents  something  they  didn't  before   Any  of  the  above   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   26%   18%   17%   54%  
  • 18. MANY  CHILDREN  EXTEND  LEARNING  OFF  SCREEN   ACTIONS  TAKEN  DUE  TO  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA  USE   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  who  "olen":   Talk  about  something  they  saw  in  educational  media   38%   34%   Engage  in  imaginative  play  based  on  educational  media   Ask  questions  about  content  in  educational  media   Ask  to  do  an  activity  inspired  by  educational  meda   Teach  their  parents  something  they  didn't  before   Any  of  the  above   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   26%   18%   17%   54%  
  • 19. THERE  IS  A  LARGE  DROP-­‐OFF  IN  EDUCATIONAL     MEDIA  USE  AFTER  AGE  4   SCREEN  MEDIA  TIME  GOES  UP,  BUT  THE  PROPORTION  THAT  IS  EDUCATIONAL  GOES  DOWN   Propor6on  of  daily  screen  6me  that  is  educa6onal,  by  age:   (Hours:Minutes)   2:36   2:08   1:37   78%  of   screen  time   2-­‐4  year  olds   1:16   39%  of   screen  time   5-­‐7  year  olds   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   0:50   27%  of   screen  time   8-­‐10  year  olds   0:42  
  • 20. TELEVISION  LEADS  MOBILE  IN  DELIVERING     EDUCATIONAL  CONTENT   A  SMALLER  PROPORTION  OF  MOBILE  THAN  TV  CONTENT  USED  BY  CHILDREN  IS  EDUCATIONAL   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  propor6on  of  total  media  use  that  is  educa6onal,  by  pla`orm:   TV   52%   Mobile   36%   Computers   36%   Video  games   18%   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 21. TELEVISION  LEADS  MOBILE  IN  DELIVERING     EDUCATIONAL  CONTENT   CHILDREN  USE  MUCH  LESS  MOBILE  EDUCATIONAL  CONTENT  THAN  EDUCATIONAL  TV   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  average  6me  spent  per  day  with  educa6onal  content  on:     (Hours:Minutes)   0:42   0:05   TV   0:05   0:03   Mobile   Computers   Video  games   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 22. CHILDREN  LEARN  LESS  FROM  MOBILE   PLATFORMS  CHILDREN  HAVE  LEARNED  "A  LOT"  FROM   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  content  on  each  pla`orm,  percent  whose  parents   say  they  have  learned  "a  lot"  about  one  or  more  subjects  from:   TV   52%   47%   Computers   Video  games   Mobile   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   41%   39%  
  • 23. PARENTS  BELIEVE  THEIR  CHILDREN  ARE  LEARNING     FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   SUBJECTS  CHILDREN  HAVE  LEARNED  "A  LOT"  ABOUT  FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  are  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  media,  percent  whose  parents  say  they  have   learned  "a  lot"  from  any  pla`orm  about:   Cognitive  skills   37%   Reading/vocabulary   37%   28%   Math   Social  skills   25%   21%   Health  habits   19%   Science   Arts  and  culture   One  or  more  subject   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   15%   57%  
  • 24. HOW  PARENTS  FIND  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   MOST  PARENTS  AREN'T  ACTIVELY  SEARCHING  FOR  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Among  parents  of  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  say  they  find  educa6onal  media  for  their  children  by:   Coming  across  it  while  browsing   50%   40%   Suggestions  from  teachers   Suggestions  from  friends  and  family   35%   Child  comes  across  them  while  browsing   20%   Child  hears  about  from  friends   20%   Reviews  or  recommendations  online  or  in  press   20%   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 25. DIFFERENCES  BY  SOCIO-­‐ECONOMIC  STATUS   LOWER  INCOME  CHILDREN  LACK  ACCESS  TO  SOME  PLATFORMS   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  with  each  item  in  the  home:   Parents'  income  >  $100K   Parents'  income  <  $25K   99%   97%   Broadcast  TV   85%   Cable  TV   57%   98%   Hi-­‐speed  internet   58%   84%   Smartphone   57%   77%   Tablet   e-­‐Reader   27%   45%   16%   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 26. DIFFERENCES  BY  SOCIO-­‐ECONOMIC  STATUS   BUT  LOWER  INCOME  CHILDREN  USE  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA  MORE  FREQUENTLY   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  use  educa6onal  media  daily,  by  income:   Parents'  income  >  $100K   Parents'  income  $50K-­‐$99K   Parents'  income  $25K-­‐$49K   Parents'  income  <  $25K   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   25%   31%   41%   43%  
  • 27. DIFFERENCES  BY  SOCIO-­‐ECONOMIC  STATUS   LOWER  INCOME  CHILDREN  USE  MORE  SCREEN  MEDIA   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  average  6me  spent  with  ANY  screen  media  per  day,  by  income:   (Hours:Minutes)   2:33   2:21   1:57   Parents'  income     <  $25K   Parents'  income     $25K-­‐$49K   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   Parents'  income     $50K-­‐$99K   1:49   Parents'  income     >  $100K  
  • 28. DIFFERENCES  BY  RACE  AND  ETHNICITY   FOR  ALMOST  EVERY  SUBJECT  AND  PLATFORM,  BLACK  PARENTS  ARE  MORE  LIKELY  AND  HISPANIC/  LATINO   PARENTS  ARE  LESS  LIKELY  TO  SAY  THEIR  CHILD  HAS  LEARNED  FROM  EDUCATIONAL  MEDIA   Example:  Among  parents  of  2-­‐10  year-­‐old  weekly  users  of  educa6onal  computer  content,  percent  who  say   their  child  has  learned  "a  lot/some"  about  math:   79%   White   97%   Black   Hispanic/Latino   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   63%  
  • 29. DIFFERENCES  BY  RACE  AND  ETHNICITY   HISPANIC/LATINO  PARENTS  ARE  MOST  LIKELY  TO  WANT  MORE  INFORMATION  ABOUT  EDUCATIONAL   MEDIA   Among  parents  of  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  want  more  informa6on  about  the  best  educa6onal  media  for   their  children:   White   Black   Hispanic/Latino   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   46%   57%   74%  
  • 30. JOINT  MEDIA  ENGAGEMENT   MUCH  OF  CHILDREN'S  SCREEN  TIME  IS  SPENT  WITH  PARENT   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  use  each  pla`orm,  average  percent  of  6me  parent  is  using  with  them:   TV   Mobile   Video  games   Computer   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   55%   29%   26%   25%  
  • 31. ELECTRONIC  AND  PRINT  READING   TOTAL  TIME  SPENT  READING   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  average  6me  spent  reading  per  day:     (Hours:Minutes)   0:29   0:05   Print   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   E-­‐readers  
  • 32. ELECTRONIC  AND  PRINT  READING   WHY  SOME  PARENTS  DON'T  LET  THEIR  CHILD   USE  E-­‐BOOKS   ACCESS  TO  E-­‐READING  PLATFORMS   Among  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds,  percent  who  have  a   tablet  or  e-­‐reader  at  home:   Don't   have   38%   Have   and  use   31%   Among  parents  of  2-­‐10  year-­‐olds  who  have   access  to  e-­‐books  but  don't  use  them,  percent   who  say  the  reason  is  because:   Parent  prefers  experience   of  print  books   Have   but     don't   use   32%   Child  is  too  young  for  e-­‐ reader   30%   Don't  want  child  spending   more  time  with  screens   29%   Print  books  are  better  for   child's  reading  skills   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)   45%   27%  
  • 33. CONCLUDING  THOUGHTS   n  Boost  educa6onal  media  use  among  older  children   n  Reach  low-­‐income  children  most  in  need   n  Create  compelling  mobile  content   n  Encourage  high  quality  content   n  Meet  needs  of  diverse  Hispanic  community   n  Reach  more  parents  with  informa6on   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America  (2014)  
  • 34. Moving  Forward:     An  Ac6on  Agenda   January  24,  2014  
  • 35. Forum  Synthesis   Ac<on  Items  (from  report)   •  Compare  parents’  opinions  to  independent  assessments  of   the  educa6onal  value  of  children’s  media   •  Get  parents  more  informa6on  about  educa6onal  media   •  Meet  the  needs  of  older  children   •  Improve  access  and  content  for  low-­‐income  youth   •  Con6nue  to  develop  beger  mobile  content   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 36. Forum  Synthesis   Ac<on  Items  (from  report)   •  Explore  the  need  for  more  science-­‐oriented  media,  especially   for  girls   •  Beger  understand  the  needs  of  Hispanic-­‐La6no  families   •  Con6nue  to  produce  high  quality  children's  books  that  appeal   to  both  boys  and  girls,  in  print  and  electronic  formats   •  Encourage  high  quality  joint  media  engagement   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 37. Forum  Synthesis   Ac<on  Items  (from  audience)   •  Connect  school  and  home   •  More  teacher  PD,  as  parents  olen  go  to  teachers  for  advice     •  Collabora6on  opportuni6es     •  Poten6al  of  transmedia  to  connect  home,  school,  community     •  Development  technology  challenges  (cross-­‐pla`orm)   •  Include  youth  voice  as  part  of  process   •  Focus  on  what  content  kids  need  most,  i.e.,  career  pathways   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 38. Forum  Synthesis   Ac<on  Items  (from  audience)   •  Infrastructure  for  early  learning   •  Funding  streams  for  quality  content  and  delivery  pla`orms   •  Mo6va6ons  parents  have  for  mobile  device  use   •  Triangula6on:  examining  media  from  different  perspec6ves   •  Content  monopoly:  most  of  the  content  in  the  hands  of  a  few   •  Need  for  media  literacy  skills  for  children  and  families   •  Bring  low  cost-­‐devices  into  schools  and  informal  seTngs   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 39. Forum  Synthesis   Ini<a<ves  in  Progress   •  Raising  a  Reader   •  Campaign  for  Grade-­‐level  Reading   •  Infinite  Fermata   •  Mind  in  the  Making   •  BrainPOP  Game  Up   •  American  Graduate  Day  (PBS  broadcast)   •  Science  Detec6ve   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 40. Forum  Synthesis   Must-­‐dos     •  Focus  on  older  kids:  Why  did  we  stop  at  10?   •  Summer  school  outreach  opportunity   •  Need  to  get  more  informa6on  to  parents  about  media  op6ons  (CSM,  CTR):   fund  them  and  make  parents  more  aware  of  their  services  (e.g.,  Graphite)   •  Find  out  what  kids  feel  is  educa6onal  and  compare  with  what  their   parents  think  is  going  on   •  What  cons6tutes  diversity?  (e.g.,  developmental,  regional,  etc.)  What  are   benefits  of  media  use?  Develop  measures  to  track  these  outcomes   •  Engage  preK-­‐12  community  in  importance  of  online  and  off-­‐line  worlds   •  Change  parents’  aTtudes  about  the  importance  of  educa6onal  media   (modern-­‐day  Re-­‐contact  Study)   Learning  at  home:  Families’  educa6onal  media  use  in  America     January  2014  
  • 41. Download  the  report:   joanganzcooneycenter.org/publica6on/learning-­‐at-­‐home/       twiger.com/cooneycenter   facebook.com/cooneycenter   January  24,  2014