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Frank Gilliam: Framing a New Conversation: Digital Media and Learning

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  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • Then let’s ask them to connect Digital Media to Learning….so we wade into the swamp of Learning and what do we find….this is the reel from the on the streets.\n\n\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • These patterns of culture and the toxic brew are all enforced by patterns in the media presentation of dml\n
  • whether you refer to cognitive linguists like Deborah Tannen who talks about people as veterans of perception or Roger Schank who talks about experience as stored in mind by stories or the Health brothers who talk about people’s guessing machines, what FW often calls the swamp of expectations….we are interested in how the pictures in people’s heads interact with incoming information….how people’s fast and frugal thought process maps onto the incoming information and achieves meaning.\n \nSo this presentation is an exploration of what’s in people’s guessing machines when you attempt to hold a conversation about Digital Media, Learning and Children. We need to understand what’s stored in mind for each of these terms.\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
  • And those patterns of media shape patterns of cultural assumptions that Americans bring to understanding digital \n\n
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  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • So…in order to break their guessing machines and redirect thinking, FW experiments with the effects of different ways to redirect their attention. We’re only partly through that process now, but there are some very concrete things that could be done to abet that redirection….\n\nIf we could get more stories like this….we can begin to grow some new space in the public discourse where we could actually begin to talk about the advantages of digital media for learning and for children – but right now there is just too much in the swamp rearing up to eat those messages and too little good stuff to overcome them.\n \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. ! Framing a New Conversation:FrameWorks’ Research on Digital Media and Learning Franklin D. Gilliam Jr. Senior Fellow, FrameWorks Institute Dean, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs
    • 2. Expert Understanding of Digital Media Learning
    • 3. Expert Understanding of Digital Media LearningAssumption 1 D.M. improves educational outcomes
    • 4. Expert Understanding of Digital Media LearningAssumption 1 D.M. improves educational outcomesAssumption 2 D.M. is personal and collaborative
    • 5. Expert Understanding of Digital Media LearningAssumption 1 D.M. improves educational outcomesAssumption 2 D.M. is personal and collaborativeAssumption 3 D.M. increases student engagement
    • 6. Expert Understanding of Digital Media LearningAssumption 1 D.M. improves educational outcomesAssumption 2 D.M. is personal and collaborativeAssumption 3 D.M. increases student engagementAssumption 4 D.M. is connects school and real-world
    • 7. DM
    • 8. DMEntailmentEntailmentEntailmentEntailment
    • 9. DM LearningEntailmentEntailmentEntailmentEntailment
    • 10. DM LearningEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment Entailment
    • 11. DM LearningEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment Entailment
    • 12. DM LearningEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment Entailment
    • 13. Don’t bring DM Learning that in hereEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment EntailmentEntailment Entailment
    • 14. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital Media
    • 15. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital MediaAssumption 1 D.M. is entertainment and luxury
    • 16. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital MediaAssumption 1 D.M. is entertainment and luxuryAssumption 2 Artificial, inauthentic and opposite of manual
    • 17. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital MediaAssumption 1 D.M. is entertainment and luxuryAssumption 2 Artificial, inauthentic and opposite of manualAssumption 3 D.M is passive
    • 18. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital MediaAssumption 1 D.M. is entertainment and luxuryAssumption 2 Artificial, inauthentic and opposite of manualAssumption 3 D.M is passiveAssumption 4 D.M. is dangerous
    • 19. Cultural Models Used to Think Digital MediaAssumption 1 D.M. is entertainment and luxuryAssumption 2 Artificial, inauthentic and opposite of manualAssumption 3 D.M is passiveAssumption 4 D.M. is dangerousImplication Cultural assumptions about DM dissonant from
    • 20. Cultural Models Used to Think Learning
    • 21. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hard
    • 22. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardImplication Exclusionary--puts many things outside the definition of “real” education.
    • 23. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is better
    • 24. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is betterImplication Dump in as much as possible--Quantity model
    • 25. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is betterAssumption 3 Teacher-Centric
    • 26. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is betterAssumption 3 Teacher-CentricImplication If there isn’t a teacher front and center, it’s not
    • 27. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is betterAssumption 3 Teacher-CentricAssumption 4 Individual students (and teachers) are responsible
    • 28. Cultural Models Used to Think LearningAssumption 1 It must be hardAssumption 2 More is betterAssumption 3 Teacher-CentricAssumption 4 Individual students (and teachers) are responsibleImplication Makes it difficult to think a role for policy
    • 29. A Toxic Combo of Association
    • 30. A Toxic Combo of AssociationDigital Media Learning
    • 31. A Toxic Combo of Association Digital media does Real learning needsnot belong in school to avoid distractions Real learning must be formal and traditional
    • 32. The Stories The News is Telling•DML is about adults and business•DML is about danger, risks and distractions•It’s not about children (12 and under=4% of coverage)•It’s not about learning or educational benefits (=4% ofcoverage)
    • 33. Adding Another Ingredient to the Toxic Cocktail LearningDigital Media
    • 34. Adding Another Ingredient to the Toxic Cocktail ECD LearningDigital Media
    • 35. Cultural Models Used to Think ECD
    • 36. Cultural Models Used to Think ECDAssumption 1 Development is about keeping kids “safe”
    • 37. Cultural Models Used to Think ECDAssumption 1 Development is about keeping kids “safe”Assumption 2 Community as predator
    • 38. Cultural Models Used to Think ECDAssumption 1 Development is about keeping kids “safe”Assumption 2 Community as predatorAssumption 3 Discipline and structure are paramount
    • 39. Cultural Models Used to Think ECDAssumption 1 Development is about keeping kids “safe”Assumption 2 Community as predatorAssumption 3 Discipline and structure are paramount Development is “natural” and automatic--justAssumption 4 leave it alone
    • 40. Cultural Models Used to Think ECDAssumption 1 Development is about keeping kids “safe”Assumption 2 Community as predatorAssumption 3 Discipline and structure are paramount Development is “natural” and automatic--justAssumption 4 leave it aloneImplication DM threatens development
    • 41. DM Learning
    • 42. DM + Learning + ECD
    • 43. DM + Learning + ECD DM for learning DM as hands on learning DM as facilitating participationDM as developmentally appropriate
    • 44. DM + Learning + ECD •DM as a tool for early learning •Bridge formal and informal learning •Peer-based DM for learning networked learning •DM for problem DM as hands on learning solving •Interactive student- DM as facilitating participation centered learningDM as developmentally appropriate
    • 45. The Stories We Need To Tell
    • 46. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history)
    • 47. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history) Stories of children coming together via social media to solve problems and contribute to communities
    • 48. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history) Stories of children coming together via social media to solve problems and contribute to communities Stories of digital media as hands-on learning opportunities
    • 49. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history) Stories of children coming together via social media to solve problems and contribute to communities Stories of digital media as hands-on learning opportunities Stories of children interacting with environments through digital media
    • 50. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history) Stories of children coming together via social media to solve problems and contribute to communities Stories of digital media as hands-on learning opportunities Stories of children interacting with environments through digital media Stories of teachers as mentors for rather than purveyors of student learning
    • 51. The Stories We Need To TellStories of digital media applied to develop foundational skills--especially those traditionally seen as basic (writing, science, math, history) Stories of children coming together via social media to solve problems and contribute to communities Stories of digital media as hands-on learning opportunities Stories of children interacting with environments through digital media Stories of teachers as mentors for rather than purveyors of student learning Stories of digital media as tool to overcome boundaries of time and space that confront education reform