Lord Alfred Tennyson The Eagle
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Lord Alfred Tennyson The Eagle

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This presentation is a short Bio of his life and a short lesson on the poem "The Eagle."

This presentation is a short Bio of his life and a short lesson on the poem "The Eagle."

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  • The Sun is symbolic of a god, The eagle of a noble person the sea the ordinary people.
  • Aeroplanes were not invented at the time the poem was written, the image of the sea crawling was not known to many.
  • Single rhyme in each stanza—affirms the singleness and aloneness of the eagle.The first stanza shows motionless whereas the second shows movement – crawls, watches and he falls. Motionless to action

Transcript

  • 1. The Eagle
    Lord Alfred Tennyson
    (1809-1892)
  • 2. Life
    Tennyson was born on 6thAugust 1809 in Somersby, Lincolnshire.
    The fourth of twelve children.
    He was the son of a clergyman. Rev. George Clayton Tennyson.
  • 3. Alfred with his wifeEmily (1813-1896)his son Hallam (1852-1928) andLionel (1854-1886).
  • 4.  Farringford- Lord Tennyson's residence on the Isle of Wight
  • 5. He is the second most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare.
    "'Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all”
    "Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die”
    "My strength is as the strength of ten, / Because my heart is pure”
    "Knowledge comes, but Wisdom lingers”
    "The old order changeth, yielding place to new".
  • 6. The Eagle
  • 7. The Eagle
    He clasps the crag with crooked hands;  Close to the sun in lonely lands,  Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
     
    The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;  He watches from his mountain walls,  And like a thunderbolt he falls.
  • 8.
  • 9. Alliteration
    He clasps the crag with crooked hands;  
    The hard consonant /k/ in the three words.
    Could it suggest hardness of the rock and firmness of the bird?
  • 10. Symbols
     Close to the sun in lonely lands,  
    Close to the sun - This could illustrate the status of a person.
    In lonely lands – This could point out how lonely someone can be in this position.
  • 11. Personification
     He clasps the crag with crooked hands Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
    The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;  He watches from his mountain walls,  And like a thunderbolt he falls.
      azure – a deep blue sky blue colour
  • 12. Simile
     
    The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;  He watches from his mountain walls,  And like a thunderbolt he falls.
    What is the effect of the simile?
  • 13. The Eagle
    He clasps the crag with crooked hands;  Close to the sun in lonely lands,  Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
    The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;  He watches from his mountain walls,  And like a thunderbolt he falls.
  • 14. Adjectives
    Tennyson used the pairing of two-syllable adjectives with one-syllable nouns to help keep the meter of the poem intact.
    “crooked hands,”
    “lonely lands,”
    “azure world,”
    “wrinkled sea,”
    “mountain walls.” 
  • 15. Syllables
      He used no word longer than two syllables until the last line.
    Thunderbolt
    3 syllables
    It conveys power which any eagle certainly has.
  • 16.
  • 17. Compare this poem to Ted Hughes’s “Hawk Roosting.” Why do you think both birds are portrayed with such nobility? Which poem do you think contradicts that noble appearance most? How?
  • 18. This poem has references to the ancient Greek myth of Icarus.
    Study that story, and explain how you think knowing it helps a reader interpret what Tennyson is saying here.
  • 19. Carol Wolff