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Introduction to poetry

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Introduction to Poetry with flash cards and Higher Order thinking skills applied to poem.

Introduction to Poetry with flash cards and Higher Order thinking skills applied to poem.

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  • 1. Introduction to Poetry Billy Collins
  • 2.
    • I ask them to take a poem
    • and hold it up to the light
    • like a color slide
    • or press an ear against its hive.
    • I say drop a mouse into a poem
    • and watch him probe his way out,
    • or walk inside the poem’s room
    • and feel the walls for a light switch.
    • I want them to waterski
    • across the surface of a poem
    • waving at the author’s name on the shore.
    • But all they want to do
    • is tie the poem to a chair with rope
    • and torture a confession out of it.
    • They begin beating it with a hose
    • to find out what it really means.
  • 3. Poetry means nothing if unread
  • 4. color slide
  • 5. to press
  • 6. hive
  • 7. to drop
  • 8. to probe
  • 9. light switch
  • 10. waterski
  • 11. surface
  • 12. to wave
  • 13. author
  • 14. shore
  • 15. to tie
  • 16. rope
  • 17. torture
  • 18. confession
  • 19. beating
  • 20. hose
  • 21. Poetry means nothing if unread
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
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  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. Poetry means nothing if unread
  • 40. color slide
  • 41. to press
  • 42. hive
  • 43. to drop
  • 44. to probe
  • 45. light switch
  • 46. waterski
  • 47. surface
  • 48. to wave
  • 49. author
  • 50. shore
  • 51. to tie
  • 52. rope
  • 53. torture
  • 54. confession
  • 55. beating
  • 56. hose
  • 57.
    • I ask them to take a poem
    • and hold it up to the light
    • like a color slide
    • or press an ear against its hive.
    • I say drop a mouse into a poem
    • and watch him probe his way out,
    • or walk inside the poem’s room
    • and feel the walls for a light switch .
  • 58.
    • I want them to waterski
    • across the surface of a poem
    • waving at the author ’s name on the shore.
    • But all they want to do
    • is tie the poem to a chair with rope
    • and torture a confession out of it.
    • They begin beating it with a hose
    • to find out what it really means.
  • 59. senses
    • I ask them to take a poem
    • and hold it up to the light sight
    • like a color slide
    • or press an ear against its hive. sound
    • I say drop a mouse into a poem feel
    • and watch him probe his way out,
    • or walk inside the poem’s room
    • and feel the walls for a light switch. feel
  • 60. HOTS Higher Order Thinking Skills
    • Explaining patterns :
    • Identify and explain different patterns in the text and explain their significance.
    • • Explain why certain lines/ phrases/words are repeated.
    • • What behavior does the character/speaker repeat?
  • 61.
    • I ask them to take a poem request
    • and hold it up to the light
    • like a color slide
    • or press an ear against its hive.
    • I say drop a mouse into a poem
    • and watch him probe his way out,
    • or walk inside the poem’s room
    • and feel the walls for a light switch.
    • I want them to waterski command
    • across the surface of a poem
    • waving at the author’s name on the shore.
  • 62.
    • But all they want to do
    • is tie the poem to a chair with rope
    • and torture a confession out of it.
    • They begin beating it with a hose
    • to find out what it really means.
  • 63. Theme
    • an investigation
    • an intent
    • playfulness of poetry
  • 64.